Scott of the Antarctic (1949)

Scott of the Antarctic (1949)





Critic Consensus: No consensus yet.

Scott of the Antarctic Photos

Movie Info

John Mills stars as Commander Scott, the leader of the ill-fated and famed 1911 expedition to be the first to discover the South Pole. The British were up against the Norwegians in the Arctic quest for fame and honor which was won by Norway.
PG (for mild thematic elements and brief language)
Action & Adventure , Classics , Drama
Directed By:
Written By:
In Theaters:
Eagle-Lion Classics

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John Mills
as Capt. R.F. Scott
James Robertson Justice
as P.O. Taff Evans
Derek Bond
as Capt. L.E.G. Oates
Harold Warrender
as Dr. E.A. Wilson
Reginald Beckwith
as Lt. H.R. Bowers
Kenneth More
as Lt. Teddy Evans
James McKechnie
as Lt. Atkinson
John Gregson
as Petty Officer Green
Norman Williams
as Stoker Lashley
Barry Letts
as Apsley Cherry-Garrard
Clive Morton
as Herbert Ponting
Anne Firth
as Oriana Wilson
Diana Churchill
as Kathleen Scott
Dennis Vance
as Charles Wright
Larry Burns
as Kilhane
Edward Lisak
as Dmitri
Melville Crawford
as Cecil Mears
Christopher Lee
as Bernard Day
John Owers
as E.J. Hooper
Bruce Seton
as Canell
Sam Kydd
as McKenzie
Mary Merritt
as Helen Field
Percy Walsh
as Chairman of Meeting
Noel Howlett
as 1st Questioner
Philip Stainton
as 2nd Questioner
Desmond Roberts
as Admiralty Official
Des Roberts
as Admiralty Official
Dandy Nichols
as Caroline
David Lines
as Telegraph Boy
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Critic Reviews for Scott of the Antarctic

All Critics (1)

When all is said and done, this is an honest account of British Captain Scott's doomed second expedition to the inhospitable South Pole.

Full Review… | December 4, 2009
Ozus' World Movie Reviews

Audience Reviews for Scott of the Antarctic

In the year 1910, British explorer Robert F. Scott (John Mills) set off on an expedition - his bid to become first to reach the South Pole. Incidentally, Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen had the exact same thoughts. While Amundsen is mentioned often in the film, he is never shown, as this film focuses entirely on Scott's arduous trek. Watching this, you wonder why anyone would attempt such a dangerous, seemingly foolhardy undertaking. I suppose - it's a testament to the adventurous spirit of man - the desire to be the first to plant your footsteps on unexplored territory - as explained by Scott's wife, Kathleen (Diana Churchill) early in the film, as she ruminates on her husband's upcoming plans. The story is told in a relatively straight-forward manner. It's almost documentary in style in that regard - free of extraneous drama. The attention to detail is marvelous here...from the clothing on down to the equipment used by the expedition. The atmosphere becomes grittier and grittier as the toll of dwindling supplies and the hardships of the quest wear on the men. The downside to the script being that there does seem to be a few dull spots here and there as the film recreates a trek involving men trudging through hundreds & hundreds of miles lasting months and months. There's just no getting around that fact! On the plus side is the cinematography. Three names are credited here in that department: Jack Cardiff, Osmond Borradaile, and Geoffrey Unsworth. I'm not too familiar with Borradaile...but Cardiff is especially known for his work on the films directed by Michael Powell. Cardiff's use of Technicolor here - especially his color pallette of muted earth tones reminds me much of his work in BLACK NARCISSUS. Unsworth would go on to shoot Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY. Even the sets, shot at Ealing Studios have a painterly background - giving a lyrical quality to turn-of-the-century England. The outdoor scenes were shot mostly in Norway and Switzerland - standing in for Antarctica. Seeing men as tiny specks on the frozen expanse - very humbling indeed. 8

bernard anselmo
bernard anselmo

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