She Done Him Wrong Reviews

  • Feb 07, 2021

    This film is entirely borne on the shoulders of Mae West. Her distinctive drawl, wry humor, and comedic timing are far and away the most memorable and enjoyable elements, but once the film switches from a lighthearted comedy based around West's Lady Lou to an undistinguished gangster drama-romance with a rather nonsensical ending, it loses steam fast. Grant is initially unrecognizable this early in his career with his schoolboy looks and gangly frame, and doesn't really carry the charisma that he would build his career off of. Still, this is the first film starring West that I've seen, and it makes me want to see more for her alone, hopefully other films featuring her incorporate a story that takes advantage of her unique strengths. (2.5/5)

    This film is entirely borne on the shoulders of Mae West. Her distinctive drawl, wry humor, and comedic timing are far and away the most memorable and enjoyable elements, but once the film switches from a lighthearted comedy based around West's Lady Lou to an undistinguished gangster drama-romance with a rather nonsensical ending, it loses steam fast. Grant is initially unrecognizable this early in his career with his schoolboy looks and gangly frame, and doesn't really carry the charisma that he would build his career off of. Still, this is the first film starring West that I've seen, and it makes me want to see more for her alone, hopefully other films featuring her incorporate a story that takes advantage of her unique strengths. (2.5/5)

  • Jul 23, 2020

    Nowhere near enough Grant to be fun.

    Nowhere near enough Grant to be fun.

  • Dec 07, 2019

    By today's standards Mae West is not a particularly attractive woman but in 1933 a woman willing to show some cleavage and speak like an antecedent of Barbra Streisand in Hello, Dolly! (1969) was something worth paying to see. I was relieved that this film was only one hour and six minutes long as it's plot was fairly thin and West was clearly intended to carry the film but I was never very charmed by her personality and she didn't dazzle me with her looks as Rita Hayworth in Gilda (1946) did. Perhaps your great-great grandfather was titillated by it but it is unlikely to entertain young men today and I am glad that West did not continue her rein as the queen of the box office. In the 1890s in New York City, Prostitute and singer Lady Lou, Mae West, is financially supported by her many male admirers who offer her jewels so that they can continue sleeping with her. Her primary supporter is employer Gus Jordan, Noah Beery, but her attention has drifted to Mission director Captain Cummings, Cary Grant, who is more resistant to her charms than most men are. She finds herself in a bind when Jordan forces her to visit her ex-lover, the dangerous gangster Chick Clark, Owen Moore, in prison. She has tired of him but fears what he will do when or if he gets out and bides her time convincing other men who are attracted to her to protect her in this case. She is shocked, as is everybody else working with her, when it is discovered that Cummings is in fact an undercover police officer and arrests Jordan and all of his accomplices. He lets Lou go free but slips and engagement ring onto her finger and tells her she will marry him. I assume that the argument made in favor of the film was that it was presenting the transformation of a woman from a dirty, impure prostitute into a good, devoted woman who commits herself to one man. This was to cover up the fact that the entire film is really about how large West's breasts are and what it would be like to be around a woman who would agree to sleep with men for so little. Because of this the film feels slight and struggles to fill it's 66 minute running time with all of the loving close-up shots of the hideous West and the amount of times we hear it reiterated that the men around her desire her. The film would have worked better as a comedic short film of about 20 minutes in length instead of being a full feature in which much more is expected. This did not stop the film from being a huge hit as it was one of the top grossers of 1933 and is credited with singlehandedly saving Paramount Pictures from financial ruin. West was the big problem with the film for me as she was clearly set up as it's star attraction and there is rarely a moment when the camera is not focused solely on her. As previously stated I do not find her physically attractive but it is her personality that makes it particularly hard to believe that she was such a success with the men as she was bawdy and vulgar but never funny. Just because she delivered several lines in the style of Rosalind Russell as though they were witty one liners it did not mean that what she was saying was funny. I never liked her but never found her to be a compelling anti-hero or a deliciously villainous manipulative woman who controls those around her. The film very clearly wants you to love here or at least see the events that unfold from her perspective and I had trouble supporting a woman who uses people for money and gets away with crimes because she is attractive in the eyes of one man. Very few modern audiences watch this film as it is terribly outdated and I can not see it experiencing a rediscovery as it has little to offer and shows off West's limitations as an actress which meant that she produced few other hits.

    By today's standards Mae West is not a particularly attractive woman but in 1933 a woman willing to show some cleavage and speak like an antecedent of Barbra Streisand in Hello, Dolly! (1969) was something worth paying to see. I was relieved that this film was only one hour and six minutes long as it's plot was fairly thin and West was clearly intended to carry the film but I was never very charmed by her personality and she didn't dazzle me with her looks as Rita Hayworth in Gilda (1946) did. Perhaps your great-great grandfather was titillated by it but it is unlikely to entertain young men today and I am glad that West did not continue her rein as the queen of the box office. In the 1890s in New York City, Prostitute and singer Lady Lou, Mae West, is financially supported by her many male admirers who offer her jewels so that they can continue sleeping with her. Her primary supporter is employer Gus Jordan, Noah Beery, but her attention has drifted to Mission director Captain Cummings, Cary Grant, who is more resistant to her charms than most men are. She finds herself in a bind when Jordan forces her to visit her ex-lover, the dangerous gangster Chick Clark, Owen Moore, in prison. She has tired of him but fears what he will do when or if he gets out and bides her time convincing other men who are attracted to her to protect her in this case. She is shocked, as is everybody else working with her, when it is discovered that Cummings is in fact an undercover police officer and arrests Jordan and all of his accomplices. He lets Lou go free but slips and engagement ring onto her finger and tells her she will marry him. I assume that the argument made in favor of the film was that it was presenting the transformation of a woman from a dirty, impure prostitute into a good, devoted woman who commits herself to one man. This was to cover up the fact that the entire film is really about how large West's breasts are and what it would be like to be around a woman who would agree to sleep with men for so little. Because of this the film feels slight and struggles to fill it's 66 minute running time with all of the loving close-up shots of the hideous West and the amount of times we hear it reiterated that the men around her desire her. The film would have worked better as a comedic short film of about 20 minutes in length instead of being a full feature in which much more is expected. This did not stop the film from being a huge hit as it was one of the top grossers of 1933 and is credited with singlehandedly saving Paramount Pictures from financial ruin. West was the big problem with the film for me as she was clearly set up as it's star attraction and there is rarely a moment when the camera is not focused solely on her. As previously stated I do not find her physically attractive but it is her personality that makes it particularly hard to believe that she was such a success with the men as she was bawdy and vulgar but never funny. Just because she delivered several lines in the style of Rosalind Russell as though they were witty one liners it did not mean that what she was saying was funny. I never liked her but never found her to be a compelling anti-hero or a deliciously villainous manipulative woman who controls those around her. The film very clearly wants you to love here or at least see the events that unfold from her perspective and I had trouble supporting a woman who uses people for money and gets away with crimes because she is attractive in the eyes of one man. Very few modern audiences watch this film as it is terribly outdated and I can not see it experiencing a rediscovery as it has little to offer and shows off West's limitations as an actress which meant that she produced few other hits.

  • Oct 11, 2019

    She Done Him Wrong, produced in 1933, is a perfect reflection of the amazing films produced throughout the Golden Age of Hollywood. The film's overall quality stands out as a result of its top tier acting, and solid plotline. Aside from the artistic elements of this film, there is a strong representation of the time period through realistic portrayal of women and minority groups in society, and the effects of the Great Depression on the film industry. Mae West's acting in the film is what stands out the most in the movie, artistically. Her use of original puns and innuendos, provide the film with an edge that intrigues viewers. Her keen ability to express the ideas of femininity and sexuality in a way that grabs the attention of the film's audience is the main strong suit of the film. Not only is she is witty and clever with her jokes, but she can also sing remarkably well which adds to the overall quality of the film. The story is well told and easy to follow as a result of Mae West's ability to keep viewers interested through frequent but not drawn out humor. The plot is also creative, original and takes many twists and turns that make it fun and fascinating. These artistic elements of the film enhances the strength of the historical significance of this film. Not only was She Done Him Wrong a groundbreaking film for the way female actresses express themselves through film, it also includes innovative aspects of social realism which were important for the progression of the film industry following the great depression. The movie portrays women as overtly sensual and materialistic, specifically when it comes to jewelry and fancy clothes. Though the stereotype that women are materialistic was not new, the idea that women could also be openly sexual was new to the film industry However, what is innovative about both these aspects is that Mae West's portrayal of these two ideas come across as empowering, rather than demeaning and objectifying. It was unfamiliar to audiences to see women embracing sexuality so openly on screen, and Mae West changed the stereotype that women must not express these thoughts aloud. Throughout the film, there is little to no representation of minority groups which tells viewers a lot about the time period. In the film, there is one African American and she is a housekeeper/servant, and quite frankly, gets treated very rudely. This is a reflection of the time period's overall ignorance toward minority groups. As a result of the Great Depression, producers turned to new tactics of reeling audiences back in. One way that they did this was through big on screen personalities and more risqué content. This is reflected in She Done Him wrong throughout it's controversial subject matter, jokes and highly empowered/progressive female lead. Overall, She Done Him Wrong is a strong representation of the originality and high quality films produced in the Golden Age of Hollywood. This is seen through Mae West's wit, strong female lead, and over the top singing/acting, the film's exciting story, and the film's on point representation of the time period following the great depression and its effect on film.

    She Done Him Wrong, produced in 1933, is a perfect reflection of the amazing films produced throughout the Golden Age of Hollywood. The film's overall quality stands out as a result of its top tier acting, and solid plotline. Aside from the artistic elements of this film, there is a strong representation of the time period through realistic portrayal of women and minority groups in society, and the effects of the Great Depression on the film industry. Mae West's acting in the film is what stands out the most in the movie, artistically. Her use of original puns and innuendos, provide the film with an edge that intrigues viewers. Her keen ability to express the ideas of femininity and sexuality in a way that grabs the attention of the film's audience is the main strong suit of the film. Not only is she is witty and clever with her jokes, but she can also sing remarkably well which adds to the overall quality of the film. The story is well told and easy to follow as a result of Mae West's ability to keep viewers interested through frequent but not drawn out humor. The plot is also creative, original and takes many twists and turns that make it fun and fascinating. These artistic elements of the film enhances the strength of the historical significance of this film. Not only was She Done Him Wrong a groundbreaking film for the way female actresses express themselves through film, it also includes innovative aspects of social realism which were important for the progression of the film industry following the great depression. The movie portrays women as overtly sensual and materialistic, specifically when it comes to jewelry and fancy clothes. Though the stereotype that women are materialistic was not new, the idea that women could also be openly sexual was new to the film industry However, what is innovative about both these aspects is that Mae West's portrayal of these two ideas come across as empowering, rather than demeaning and objectifying. It was unfamiliar to audiences to see women embracing sexuality so openly on screen, and Mae West changed the stereotype that women must not express these thoughts aloud. Throughout the film, there is little to no representation of minority groups which tells viewers a lot about the time period. In the film, there is one African American and she is a housekeeper/servant, and quite frankly, gets treated very rudely. This is a reflection of the time period's overall ignorance toward minority groups. As a result of the Great Depression, producers turned to new tactics of reeling audiences back in. One way that they did this was through big on screen personalities and more risqué content. This is reflected in She Done Him wrong throughout it's controversial subject matter, jokes and highly empowered/progressive female lead. Overall, She Done Him Wrong is a strong representation of the originality and high quality films produced in the Golden Age of Hollywood. This is seen through Mae West's wit, strong female lead, and over the top singing/acting, the film's exciting story, and the film's on point representation of the time period following the great depression and its effect on film.

  • Jan 26, 2019

    The best, GREATEST comedy movie ever made! With the best movie song ever sung: Frankie and Johnny! And the best movie quote ever spoken: "Why don't you come up sometime and see me?"

    The best, GREATEST comedy movie ever made! With the best movie song ever sung: Frankie and Johnny! And the best movie quote ever spoken: "Why don't you come up sometime and see me?"

  • Nov 25, 2016

    Films from the early 1930s seem like they were made centuries rather than decades ago. Mae West looks to be the ultimate cliched scarlet woman until you realise she is the original that created the cliche. Tastes have changed but she does still have a curious charm. The film is fun if watched in the right spirit.

    Films from the early 1930s seem like they were made centuries rather than decades ago. Mae West looks to be the ultimate cliched scarlet woman until you realise she is the original that created the cliche. Tastes have changed but she does still have a curious charm. The film is fun if watched in the right spirit.

  • Nov 24, 2016

    Just fun watching the original diva!

    Just fun watching the original diva!

  • Antonius B Super Reviewer
    Mar 31, 2016

    It's interesting that this is one of the films cited as pushing to get the Hays Code in place the following year, since there is certainly less skin shown than many other movies in the time period. What frightened people saw was Mae West, and not her curves that pretty clearly signaled the end of the era of the flappers, but how brazenly she flaunted her sexuality. She purrs and sizes men up and down as she sees them. She makes it clear she wants nothing but a tumble in the hay. This is the first movie she drawls "Why don't you come up sometime 'n see me?" to Cary Grant. Talk about a movie with larger-than-life personalities and accents in Grant and West! The line that summarizes West's persona best from the film is this one: "Men are all alike - married or single. It's their game. I happen to be smart enough to play it their way". To the censors, hypocritically, the idea that women could take control of their sexuality was as bad or worse than seeing a bare thigh here or there. As for the film itself, if you're a Mae West fan, this is probably must-see. It may be of interest to see a younger Cary Grant as well, though I found later he was already 29 at the time (West was ten years older). While I smiled as she slinked around in tight, sparkly dresses, moaning one double entendre after another, she just doesn't do it for me, and the plot which takes place in the 'gay 90's' isn't enough to recommend the film. I did love the very last lines, with Grant saying "You baaad girl", and West smiling and saying "You'll find out" before they kiss. Oh Mae, you're so naughty.

    It's interesting that this is one of the films cited as pushing to get the Hays Code in place the following year, since there is certainly less skin shown than many other movies in the time period. What frightened people saw was Mae West, and not her curves that pretty clearly signaled the end of the era of the flappers, but how brazenly she flaunted her sexuality. She purrs and sizes men up and down as she sees them. She makes it clear she wants nothing but a tumble in the hay. This is the first movie she drawls "Why don't you come up sometime 'n see me?" to Cary Grant. Talk about a movie with larger-than-life personalities and accents in Grant and West! The line that summarizes West's persona best from the film is this one: "Men are all alike - married or single. It's their game. I happen to be smart enough to play it their way". To the censors, hypocritically, the idea that women could take control of their sexuality was as bad or worse than seeing a bare thigh here or there. As for the film itself, if you're a Mae West fan, this is probably must-see. It may be of interest to see a younger Cary Grant as well, though I found later he was already 29 at the time (West was ten years older). While I smiled as she slinked around in tight, sparkly dresses, moaning one double entendre after another, she just doesn't do it for me, and the plot which takes place in the 'gay 90's' isn't enough to recommend the film. I did love the very last lines, with Grant saying "You baaad girl", and West smiling and saying "You'll find out" before they kiss. Oh Mae, you're so naughty.

  • Mar 26, 2015

    Notable for being one of the first films for both Mae West (who wrote it), and Cary Grant, but it's mainly a vanity project for the admittedly confident and ahead-of-her-time West, who is too old for the part and overplays it with droll inflections on each of her words. The plot, about a crime ring who West is involved with that Grant is investigating, is inconsequential, and really an excuse to see West seduce and get seduced by a string of men and sing horrendously. Ahead of its time in a few good ways, but also in a few bad ways, this is one of the first true vanity movies.

    Notable for being one of the first films for both Mae West (who wrote it), and Cary Grant, but it's mainly a vanity project for the admittedly confident and ahead-of-her-time West, who is too old for the part and overplays it with droll inflections on each of her words. The plot, about a crime ring who West is involved with that Grant is investigating, is inconsequential, and really an excuse to see West seduce and get seduced by a string of men and sing horrendously. Ahead of its time in a few good ways, but also in a few bad ways, this is one of the first true vanity movies.

  • Jan 25, 2015

    West is pretty unique for her time. 1001 movies to see before you die.

    West is pretty unique for her time. 1001 movies to see before you die.