Six Degrees of Separation Reviews

  • 3d ago

    A strong cast makes it a really interesting watch.

    A strong cast makes it a really interesting watch.

  • Jan 18, 2020

    one of my favorites

    one of my favorites

  • Jun 11, 2019

    I can see the appeal to this film but all I got from it was pretentious dialogue and a story that never fully develops

    I can see the appeal to this film but all I got from it was pretentious dialogue and a story that never fully develops

  • May 09, 2019

    It’s fairly obvious that Six Degrees of Separation is a film based on a play. The speeches and the exposition all feel like watching live theater, and I thought the actors were even playing it broad and melodramatic as they might on the stage. This expressive performance creates some comedy, which I wasn’t totally sure was intentional. Later in the film, it became more obvious that they actually meant for this to be somewhat funny, but it took me some time to realize the actors were hamming it up on purpose. It rides the line for me, because I found it worthy of an occasional chuckle, but nothing was funny enough to give me a good hearty laugh. I spent most of the movie puzzling out the motives of Will Smith’s character. His past is slowly revealed as the film goes on, but it never gives us a clear idea of his end goal. It is the kind of movie that would normally have a big reveal at the end where we see why everything happened, but we get none of that here. The acting is what kept me engaged in Six Degrees of Separation. Everyone plays these pompous rich people with an excess of pride and privilege. Donald Sutherland might have the strongest grasp on how to spin it for comedic effect, because he has certain expressions that made me smile, and an excess of earnestness that works so well. Will Smith is delightful as the fast-talking con man. He has the advantage that his character has a past outside of high society, so any time I hear his proper speech slip, it’s hard to tell if it was accidental or a character choice. The biggest struggle I have with Six Degrees of Separation is that there appears to be very little story to tell. It’s a bunch of interactions and interesting conversations, but I couldn’t find a goal or purpose for any of the characters. The ending is disappointing because I didn’t know why they got there, and I didn’t care what would happen next. It’s an easy film to watch, but I can’t help feeling like I’m missing something.

    It’s fairly obvious that Six Degrees of Separation is a film based on a play. The speeches and the exposition all feel like watching live theater, and I thought the actors were even playing it broad and melodramatic as they might on the stage. This expressive performance creates some comedy, which I wasn’t totally sure was intentional. Later in the film, it became more obvious that they actually meant for this to be somewhat funny, but it took me some time to realize the actors were hamming it up on purpose. It rides the line for me, because I found it worthy of an occasional chuckle, but nothing was funny enough to give me a good hearty laugh. I spent most of the movie puzzling out the motives of Will Smith’s character. His past is slowly revealed as the film goes on, but it never gives us a clear idea of his end goal. It is the kind of movie that would normally have a big reveal at the end where we see why everything happened, but we get none of that here. The acting is what kept me engaged in Six Degrees of Separation. Everyone plays these pompous rich people with an excess of pride and privilege. Donald Sutherland might have the strongest grasp on how to spin it for comedic effect, because he has certain expressions that made me smile, and an excess of earnestness that works so well. Will Smith is delightful as the fast-talking con man. He has the advantage that his character has a past outside of high society, so any time I hear his proper speech slip, it’s hard to tell if it was accidental or a character choice. The biggest struggle I have with Six Degrees of Separation is that there appears to be very little story to tell. It’s a bunch of interactions and interesting conversations, but I couldn’t find a goal or purpose for any of the characters. The ending is disappointing because I didn’t know why they got there, and I didn’t care what would happen next. It’s an easy film to watch, but I can’t help feeling like I’m missing something.

  • Apr 12, 2019

    Good acting all around think Blobbo.

    Good acting all around think Blobbo.

  • May 11, 2018

    Anyone who gave this movie a bad rating is simple not intelligent enough to follow from premis to conclusion.

    Anyone who gave this movie a bad rating is simple not intelligent enough to follow from premis to conclusion.

  • Kevin M. W Super Reviewer
    Sep 26, 2017

    In an interesting dream scenario, rich, upper Eastside New Yorkers have their guilt about racial inequality expunged by a run-in with streetwise Will Smith (who incredibly learns to fake a Harvard-worthy education in 3, count'em, 3 weeks!). Sutherland and Channing do well for this off-to-see-the-wizard roadtrip, merely bouncing off one another as they relate to the wine and cheese set what it was like to bump against one of the (shiver!) great unwashed. You don't hear about this fantasy much because of the rarified clientele it kowtows to. Still, everyone does their job, even if the story never leaves the environs of 34 floors above Central Park. The dripping, well intentioned liberalism nearly drowns, however clever, however manipulative. Worth seeing though, if only for the brief treatise on Catcher In The Rye, engagingly delivered by Smith.

    In an interesting dream scenario, rich, upper Eastside New Yorkers have their guilt about racial inequality expunged by a run-in with streetwise Will Smith (who incredibly learns to fake a Harvard-worthy education in 3, count'em, 3 weeks!). Sutherland and Channing do well for this off-to-see-the-wizard roadtrip, merely bouncing off one another as they relate to the wine and cheese set what it was like to bump against one of the (shiver!) great unwashed. You don't hear about this fantasy much because of the rarified clientele it kowtows to. Still, everyone does their job, even if the story never leaves the environs of 34 floors above Central Park. The dripping, well intentioned liberalism nearly drowns, however clever, however manipulative. Worth seeing though, if only for the brief treatise on Catcher In The Rye, engagingly delivered by Smith.

  • Sep 21, 2017

    Interesting Story. Amazing performance by a young Will Smith. He probably should have been nominated for an Oscar. Stockard Channing was surprisingly nominated for her role. The story itself is okay, but still very interesting about a young man that just wants to be accepted and have a family.

    Interesting Story. Amazing performance by a young Will Smith. He probably should have been nominated for an Oscar. Stockard Channing was surprisingly nominated for her role. The story itself is okay, but still very interesting about a young man that just wants to be accepted and have a family.

  • Jun 26, 2017

    Inspired by a 1983 newspaper account, John Guare's film adaptation of his own play is about a pampered socialite's gradual realization of her spiritual emptiness beneath her complacent sophistication when one night came a-knocking an African-American confidence man fuelled with an aching yearning to be part of her world.

    Inspired by a 1983 newspaper account, John Guare's film adaptation of his own play is about a pampered socialite's gradual realization of her spiritual emptiness beneath her complacent sophistication when one night came a-knocking an African-American confidence man fuelled with an aching yearning to be part of her world.

  • May 13, 2017

    Wonderful, thoughtful and hilarious.

    Wonderful, thoughtful and hilarious.