Sorry Angel (Plaire, aimer et courir vite) Reviews

  • 4d ago

    The story was told beautifully, and the acting was just great.

    The story was told beautifully, and the acting was just great.

  • Jun 18, 2019

    Such a sad but touching movie! Worth seeing!

    Such a sad but touching movie! Worth seeing!

  • May 02, 2019

    Similar to last year's 120 BPM which I have reservations contrary to the general positive reviews it has garnered, I find Christophe Honore's graceful film (another French gay romance tinged with an AIDS-related melancholy) more engaging. While I find the former film scattered and over-stretched, I am more receptive of the more focused approach here that revolves mainly around Pierre Deladonchamps' 30something Parisien, Jacques, a slightly grumpy, gay HIV+ and somewhat hedonistic writer and the people who orbit around him: a teenage son he fathers with his friend (whose representation is so positive it's practically ahead of its time), an older gay friend who lives downstairs in his building, a young hustler, a dying ex with AIDS and Vincent Lacoste's Arthur, a 22-years-old bisexual Breton he met while in Rennes. Set in the very specific time of 1993, the film dances around this hesitating romance between Jacques and Arthur and how it affects (or not) Jacques and his family and friends and the film is moving and realistic, though admittedly also meandering at times and somewhat episodic. With solidly good to subtly great performances by the ensemble, the script, after a slightly confusing start which isn't helped by its rapid subtitles, constructs and develops an intricate and intriguing web of love, loss and relationships via the many characters we are introduced to which in turn reflects on a generation of people who lived in that era. It is over 2 hours long and feels it, and the ending won't to be everyone's taste (I certainly have my own ambivalent feelings about it) but I find myself ultimately rather drawn to Honore's personal and intimate film about a life (and the lives it touched) that's honestly and unapologetically lived on his own terms.

    Similar to last year's 120 BPM which I have reservations contrary to the general positive reviews it has garnered, I find Christophe Honore's graceful film (another French gay romance tinged with an AIDS-related melancholy) more engaging. While I find the former film scattered and over-stretched, I am more receptive of the more focused approach here that revolves mainly around Pierre Deladonchamps' 30something Parisien, Jacques, a slightly grumpy, gay HIV+ and somewhat hedonistic writer and the people who orbit around him: a teenage son he fathers with his friend (whose representation is so positive it's practically ahead of its time), an older gay friend who lives downstairs in his building, a young hustler, a dying ex with AIDS and Vincent Lacoste's Arthur, a 22-years-old bisexual Breton he met while in Rennes. Set in the very specific time of 1993, the film dances around this hesitating romance between Jacques and Arthur and how it affects (or not) Jacques and his family and friends and the film is moving and realistic, though admittedly also meandering at times and somewhat episodic. With solidly good to subtly great performances by the ensemble, the script, after a slightly confusing start which isn't helped by its rapid subtitles, constructs and develops an intricate and intriguing web of love, loss and relationships via the many characters we are introduced to which in turn reflects on a generation of people who lived in that era. It is over 2 hours long and feels it, and the ending won't to be everyone's taste (I certainly have my own ambivalent feelings about it) but I find myself ultimately rather drawn to Honore's personal and intimate film about a life (and the lives it touched) that's honestly and unapologetically lived on his own terms.

  • Apr 25, 2019

    Best film I've seen in years.

    Best film I've seen in years.

  • Feb 14, 2019

    Two men who need psychological help. Zero rating

    Two men who need psychological help. Zero rating

  • Feb 01, 2019

    Zero stars. Disgusting.

    Zero stars. Disgusting.

  • Jan 18, 2019

    0 stars. Disgusting. No matter how you slice it you can’t make this abhorrent lifestyle normal. This is not love. It’s degraded selfish propaganda.

    0 stars. Disgusting. No matter how you slice it you can’t make this abhorrent lifestyle normal. This is not love. It’s degraded selfish propaganda.

  • Dec 25, 2018

    "I said to myself, you're my last van der park," A dying middle-aged writer with AIDS who fell in love with a passionate young man who graduated from college. The director tries to find a balance between the loneliness of waiting for the end of his life and the passion for passion. However, the story line and film elements are really jumbled, erotic drama is also suspected of abuse?it confused me a little bit.

    "I said to myself, you're my last van der park," A dying middle-aged writer with AIDS who fell in love with a passionate young man who graduated from college. The director tries to find a balance between the loneliness of waiting for the end of his life and the passion for passion. However, the story line and film elements are really jumbled, erotic drama is also suspected of abuse?it confused me a little bit.

  • Nov 25, 2018

    great acting. and few perfect scenes... really good casting

    great acting. and few perfect scenes... really good casting

  • Oct 21, 2018

    Think of this as a poorly crafted step-brother of "A Single Man," and you get a rough idea of what the film is all about. While this offering redeems itself somewhat in the second hour, its first half is rife with overwritten pretentious dialogue, a meandering narrative and painfully slow pacing. What's more, much of the story line is uninteresting, unengaging and not especially credible, aspects made worse by the disjointed nature of the production's execution. There are so many other (and better) releases dealing with this subject matter that you can easily skip this one and not miss anything.

    Think of this as a poorly crafted step-brother of "A Single Man," and you get a rough idea of what the film is all about. While this offering redeems itself somewhat in the second hour, its first half is rife with overwritten pretentious dialogue, a meandering narrative and painfully slow pacing. What's more, much of the story line is uninteresting, unengaging and not especially credible, aspects made worse by the disjointed nature of the production's execution. There are so many other (and better) releases dealing with this subject matter that you can easily skip this one and not miss anything.