Spoken Word Reviews

  • Jul 11, 2014

    another touching intimate drama from nunez

    another touching intimate drama from nunez

  • Oct 26, 2012

    This movie was kind of slow for the first half of the movie,but halfway it got very interesting it was heart wrenching to see the struggles of a family trying to connect,at the end because their father is dying.It is both tragic and inspiring to see the different interactions,changes and growth of the various characters.So for this being a decent movie with decent acting and a good inspiring story overall I gave it a C.

    This movie was kind of slow for the first half of the movie,but halfway it got very interesting it was heart wrenching to see the struggles of a family trying to connect,at the end because their father is dying.It is both tragic and inspiring to see the different interactions,changes and growth of the various characters.So for this being a decent movie with decent acting and a good inspiring story overall I gave it a C.

  • Mar 16, 2011

    Really beautifully shot, acted and written.

    Really beautifully shot, acted and written.

  • Nov 07, 2010

    Nicely done family drama set in Northern New Mexico. The focus is on the lack of communication between family members, due to prid e, shame or just plain Machismo. Sure, the film trots out some familiar cliches

    Nicely done family drama set in Northern New Mexico. The focus is on the lack of communication between family members, due to prid e, shame or just plain Machismo. Sure, the film trots out some familiar cliches

  • Thomas J Super Reviewer
    Nov 06, 2010

    I really wanted to like this movie... but it was a miss. There is some decent acting, but the rest is over-the-top. It seemed scattered as to what the story was supposed to be about: his drug problem, his family issues with his brother and father, his relationship with girlfriend or the conflict with "the villain". No focus.

    I really wanted to like this movie... but it was a miss. There is some decent acting, but the rest is over-the-top. It seemed scattered as to what the story was supposed to be about: his drug problem, his family issues with his brother and father, his relationship with girlfriend or the conflict with "the villain". No focus.

  • Aug 24, 2010

    A terribly over long movie that occasionally resonates emotionally but never takes flight or flourishes into anything worthwhile. Watching the relationship between Cruz and Senior develop was always good, but the heavy detailing of Cruz's tail spin back into drugs and sordid living was quite frankly boring and divergent. The movie switches thoughts maddeningly, and by the end most audiences will probably have given up trying to follow all if this films paths.

    A terribly over long movie that occasionally resonates emotionally but never takes flight or flourishes into anything worthwhile. Watching the relationship between Cruz and Senior develop was always good, but the heavy detailing of Cruz's tail spin back into drugs and sordid living was quite frankly boring and divergent. The movie switches thoughts maddeningly, and by the end most audiences will probably have given up trying to follow all if this films paths.

  • Jul 23, 2010

    "THIS IS A POIGNANT FILM WHERE RUBEN BLADES SHINES" Directed by: Victor Nunez Running time: 116 min. Release date: July 23, 2010 (limited) Genre: Drama, Crime , and Gangster Distributor: Variance Films & New Mexica Media Partners MPAA Rating: Not rated In the literary world, the term "spoken word" refers to modern-day poetry or slams. Sparked by the words of poet Joe Ray Sandoval, a New Mexican whose poetry of dysfunctional love, family roots, and the hardnesses of life, along with co-screenplay writer William T. Conway craft a poignant story of self-expression, healing and family relationships in a Latino setting. The movie takes place outside of Sante Fe, New Mexico where Cruz portrayed by Kuno Becker (b.Eduardo Kuno Becker Paz), the well known Mexican lead actor of the "Goal" trilogy, is a successful touring poet and poetry teacher from San Francisco/Oakland Bay area where he shares his life with a beautiful artist named Shae (Persia White). His return to New Mexico where he has a shadey past of drug usage and dealing, is because of his dying reclusive former schoolteacher father Cruz Sr., brilliantly played by Ruben Blades, is dying. This stimulating plot places various characters in both Cruz Jr. and Sr.s' way of reuniting,, such as Emilio (Miguel Sandoval) a local crime boss and Cruz's younger brother Ramone who is relunctant to showing his brotherly love. The life process of all concerned in the film is a journey of redemption and recovery laced with crisp fast pacing and action. It is enlightening to see in various scenes the elements of poetry, such as, rhythm, meter, rhyme, alliteration, simile, metaphor, tone, theme, and symbolism being exposed to the audience pleasurably. Clearly, this emerging narrative offers the cast a platform to give terrific performances. I was extremely impressed with Ruben Blades portrayal of an elder sharing wisdom with his sons and challenging inevidable death. As thought provoking the storyline may be, Blades performance is twice as riverting and stimulating. This film gives an authentic look at the Latino culture in the South West, illustrating how cultural roles and machismo can give way when families can move beyond words, both broken and unspoken. Review by Gerald Wright

    "THIS IS A POIGNANT FILM WHERE RUBEN BLADES SHINES" Directed by: Victor Nunez Running time: 116 min. Release date: July 23, 2010 (limited) Genre: Drama, Crime , and Gangster Distributor: Variance Films & New Mexica Media Partners MPAA Rating: Not rated In the literary world, the term "spoken word" refers to modern-day poetry or slams. Sparked by the words of poet Joe Ray Sandoval, a New Mexican whose poetry of dysfunctional love, family roots, and the hardnesses of life, along with co-screenplay writer William T. Conway craft a poignant story of self-expression, healing and family relationships in a Latino setting. The movie takes place outside of Sante Fe, New Mexico where Cruz portrayed by Kuno Becker (b.Eduardo Kuno Becker Paz), the well known Mexican lead actor of the "Goal" trilogy, is a successful touring poet and poetry teacher from San Francisco/Oakland Bay area where he shares his life with a beautiful artist named Shae (Persia White). His return to New Mexico where he has a shadey past of drug usage and dealing, is because of his dying reclusive former schoolteacher father Cruz Sr., brilliantly played by Ruben Blades, is dying. This stimulating plot places various characters in both Cruz Jr. and Sr.s' way of reuniting,, such as Emilio (Miguel Sandoval) a local crime boss and Cruz's younger brother Ramone who is relunctant to showing his brotherly love. The life process of all concerned in the film is a journey of redemption and recovery laced with crisp fast pacing and action. It is enlightening to see in various scenes the elements of poetry, such as, rhythm, meter, rhyme, alliteration, simile, metaphor, tone, theme, and symbolism being exposed to the audience pleasurably. Clearly, this emerging narrative offers the cast a platform to give terrific performances. I was extremely impressed with Ruben Blades portrayal of an elder sharing wisdom with his sons and challenging inevidable death. As thought provoking the storyline may be, Blades performance is twice as riverting and stimulating. This film gives an authentic look at the Latino culture in the South West, illustrating how cultural roles and machismo can give way when families can move beyond words, both broken and unspoken. Review by Gerald Wright