Poster for Take My Eyes

Take My Eyes

2003, Drama, 1h 46m

34 Reviews 5,000+ Ratings

What to know

critics consensus

Graced with effective performances, Take My Eyes compellingly explores the subject of domestic abuse while avoiding simplistic characterizations. Read critic reviews

You might also like

See More
Elling poster image
Elling
Monsieur Ibrahim et les Fleurs du Coran poster image
Monsieur Ibrahim et les Fleurs du Coran
Lights in the Dusk poster image
Lights in the Dusk
DarkBlueAlmostBlack poster image
DarkBlueAlmostBlack
Italian for Beginners poster image
Italian for Beginners

Rate And Review

User image

Verified

  • User image

    Super Reviewer

    Rate this movie

    Oof, that was Rotten.

    Meh, it passed the time.

    It’s good – I’d recommend it.

    Awesome!

    So Fresh: Absolute Must See!

    What did you think of the movie? (optional)



  • You're almost there! Just confirm how you got your ticket.

  • User image

    Super Reviewer

    Step 2 of 2

    How did you buy your ticket?

    Let's get your review verified.

    • Fandango

    • AMCTheatres.com or AMC AppNew

    • Cinemark Coming Soon

      We won’t be able to verify your ticket today, but it’s great to know for the future.

    • Regal Coming Soon

      We won’t be able to verify your ticket today, but it’s great to know for the future.

    • Theater box office or somewhere else

    You're almost there! Just confirm how you got your ticket.

  • User image

    Super Reviewer

    Rate this movie

    Oof, that was Rotten.

    Meh, it passed the time.

    It’s good – I’d recommend it.

    Awesome!

    So Fresh: Absolute Must See!

    What did you think of the movie? (optional)

  • How did you buy your ticket?

    • Fandango

    • AMCTheatres.com or AMC AppNew

    • Cinemark Coming Soon

      We won’t be able to verify your ticket today, but it’s great to know for the future.

    • Regal Coming Soon

      We won’t be able to verify your ticket today, but it’s great to know for the future.

    • Theater box office or somewhere else

Take My Eyes Photos

Movie Info

One winter night, a woman named Pilar (Laia Marull) can no longer tolerate her abusive husband, Antonio (Luis Tosar), and she leaves home, taking only a few possessions and her son, Juan (Nicolás Fernández Luna). Seeking solace, Pilar moves into her sister's apartment. However, Juan longs to return to life with his father. But, despite Antonio's promises to seek therapy, Pilar is unsure if her husband is reformed and how to best keep her family together.

Cast & Crew

Critic Reviews for Take My Eyes

Audience Reviews for Take My Eyes

  • Apr 30, 2011
    A fantastic drama that shows the difficulties and pure cruelty of domestic violence, without ever becoming outlandish. Marull plays a woman that flees, with her son, from her marriage. The film is very clever in showing this act first. It leaves us as fascinated voyeurs and doesn't force us into feeling to much animosity towards the husband. This is key in allowing the film to explore its themes. Later we hear about visits to the hospital, but we don't see this happen. In fact, we see the husband trying to seek help before we see him do anything cruel. I loved this clever touch, as our view of him wasn't tainted. This is probably how many family members saw him. Hearing about his exploits, but is there a chance the wife is exaggerating? As the film progresses, we see the husband as a tragic character. Tosar adds an infinite amount of layers, but we finally see his anger as an uncontrollable destructive force. He sees himself as the victim and his wife as the enemy. In his mind, he is being assaulted. As the film draws towards its climax, there is a sense that they could work it all out, and from that comes hope. The films greatest achievement is not being about the victims. It isn't sappy, preachy, or unbearable. It would have been easy to show Tosar beating Marull, but the film's climax is even more disturbing, due to all the misplaced anger. A great movie.
    Luke B Super Reviewer
  • May 02, 2009
    Sure there were films dealing with domestic violence, but this one was so intense. This is something that had been happening quite often everywhere, in every country. And this movie was shot to make people aware for this issue and to talk about it. It is the story of a jealous husband, full of complex of inferiority, terrorizing his wife and son. I loved the love scene between both, where he made her say that she gave all her body to him. It showed perfectly the mental state of the husband who sees his wife as his property. It is so difficult to break the relationship, specially when there are kids involved. Also the challenges that women had to face when they try to leave. I think this movie is very realistic and the actors did a great job. I highly recommend it.
    Super Reviewer
  • Aug 03, 2008
    Devoted performances and a very well built script help demolish myths and misunderstandings surrounding domestic violence.
    Rhady N Super Reviewer
  • Jun 06, 2007
    This film took the top prize at a local film festival here (the same one where I saw "Las Horas del Día") so I was very surprised, having finally seen it, to find it uneven and, considering the competition, unworthy of its award. It is by no means a bad film. It is, in fact, quite brave: a portrait of an abusive relationship that spends quite a deal of time focusing on the abuser, his insecurities, his fears. It manages to humanize him completely without once making excuses for his brutal behavior. This is no charicature, but a man who knows he has a problem and seeks help. The problem is that much of the film feels like a PSA announcement. I later found out, in fact, that the film had begun as PSA-ish short and was later expanded to feature length, which makes perfect sense. Its after-school-special feel is a shame, because a lot of it is incredibly powerful. The character of Antonio is richly developped, and devastatingly played by Luis Tosar, one of the very best actors working in Europe today. The character of Pilar is not nearly as developed, but also well played by Laira Marull. Their relationship is believable, as are their reconcilliations and the scenes of abuse. It is telling that by the end of the film we, paradoxically, want for Pilar to leave, get a better life and be happy and for Antonio to pull through, work out his demons, keep his anger in check and be happy as well. Of course, Antonio is only happy with Pilar, though the opposite is not entirely true. The direction is somewhat flat, and the writing uneven and preachy, but the performances more than make up for it. This is indeed a good film worth watching, but far from the great work it has been praised as being.
    Eduardo C Super Reviewer

Movie & TV guides

View All