Texasville Reviews

  • Feb 06, 2021

    Such a collection of great stars in such a crappy movie. Slow, going nowhere, no plot, forget this one

    Such a collection of great stars in such a crappy movie. Slow, going nowhere, no plot, forget this one

  • Jul 11, 2020

    A worthy sequel to the classic original with some great performances.

    A worthy sequel to the classic original with some great performances.

  • Feb 28, 2016

    One of Peter Bogdanovich's earliest successes was adapting the novel "The Last Picture Show" into a very good coming of age film in the New Hollywood era. Years later he and many of the original cast returned to adapt the sequel to that book, "Texasville." It is not as cohesive a story, it meanders too much with no real focus or theme (other than mid-life crises and everyone being an adulterer I guess)...and it just isn't that good really, despite some great performances. Bridges is great, Shepherd is good...Annie Potts is really good in this (she is really an underrated actress)...I just never connected with this one. It felt very average, even without the comparison to the first film, this just felt like a movie with no purpose.

    One of Peter Bogdanovich's earliest successes was adapting the novel "The Last Picture Show" into a very good coming of age film in the New Hollywood era. Years later he and many of the original cast returned to adapt the sequel to that book, "Texasville." It is not as cohesive a story, it meanders too much with no real focus or theme (other than mid-life crises and everyone being an adulterer I guess)...and it just isn't that good really, despite some great performances. Bridges is great, Shepherd is good...Annie Potts is really good in this (she is really an underrated actress)...I just never connected with this one. It felt very average, even without the comparison to the first film, this just felt like a movie with no purpose.

  • Jul 05, 2013

    Good sequel to the superb The Last Picture Show, also directed by Peter Bogdanovich, 19 years earlier. Whereas The Last Picture Show dealt with the decline of small-town America, Texasville shows it still exists, but barely. Focuses on the lives of several middle-aged people, mostly the main characters from The Last Picture Show, and how their hopes and dreams have faded and reality is less pleasant. The feeling of nostalgia, of tedium, of lives going nowhere, yet hope within that emptiness, is tangible. Among this drama, there is great humour, however. Superb performances all round. This role was probably the one that turned Jeff Bridges into the downtrodden, bedraggled anti-hero, and launched countless roles for home. Cybill Shepherd is solid as Jacy. Next to Bridges, the star turn belongs to Annie Potts who is simultaneously beautiful, funny, sassy and intelligent as Karla. Ultimately does really make as big an impression as The Last Picture Show, and sort of fizzles out towards the end. The destination is quite tame, but the journey is worth taking.

    Good sequel to the superb The Last Picture Show, also directed by Peter Bogdanovich, 19 years earlier. Whereas The Last Picture Show dealt with the decline of small-town America, Texasville shows it still exists, but barely. Focuses on the lives of several middle-aged people, mostly the main characters from The Last Picture Show, and how their hopes and dreams have faded and reality is less pleasant. The feeling of nostalgia, of tedium, of lives going nowhere, yet hope within that emptiness, is tangible. Among this drama, there is great humour, however. Superb performances all round. This role was probably the one that turned Jeff Bridges into the downtrodden, bedraggled anti-hero, and launched countless roles for home. Cybill Shepherd is solid as Jacy. Next to Bridges, the star turn belongs to Annie Potts who is simultaneously beautiful, funny, sassy and intelligent as Karla. Ultimately does really make as big an impression as The Last Picture Show, and sort of fizzles out towards the end. The destination is quite tame, but the journey is worth taking.

  • Jan 14, 2013

    This long-awaited sequel to the famous film, The Last Picture Show can be summed up in numerous ways. Whether it be funny, depressing, insightful, overlong or ultimately enjoyable (among many other virtues), there is much one may take from it. As most original cast members from the first film (sans Ellen Burstyn and a few others) unite to continue the beloved story, most will find this one a viewing treat...though some lengthy, somewhat unnecessary segments get in the way at times. Skipping from the 1950s to 1984, we are reunited with the main characters that were such a big deal in high school. It is now the centennial and everyone comes back to the town they remember so fondly. Things have become much grim, however as Duane (Jeff Bridges) is struggling with debt and has a large family to raise...but with the youngsters getting into constant trouble and his wife a serious alcoholic, things definitely were better in the good old days. His high school sweetheart, Jacy (a deglamorized Cybil Shepherd) comes back, however and has not had it terribly great, either. The whole town assumes they will rekindle their romance, but the spark which set things off way back when seems more nonexistent than ever now. A film seemingly made to please fans of the legendary first installment, most should agree there is much to enjoy here and it is good to see the fine characters, though they surely are not as appealing as when they were young. Good period detail and filming locations are also done well and compensate somewhat for the film's serious overlength. Perhaps negativity is done more than necessary as the characters' everyday dilemmas are tough to watch, but it still should please most viewers. The cinematic story ends here, though some characters and the town were the subjects in three additional novels by Larry McMurtry who wrote the original novel.

    This long-awaited sequel to the famous film, The Last Picture Show can be summed up in numerous ways. Whether it be funny, depressing, insightful, overlong or ultimately enjoyable (among many other virtues), there is much one may take from it. As most original cast members from the first film (sans Ellen Burstyn and a few others) unite to continue the beloved story, most will find this one a viewing treat...though some lengthy, somewhat unnecessary segments get in the way at times. Skipping from the 1950s to 1984, we are reunited with the main characters that were such a big deal in high school. It is now the centennial and everyone comes back to the town they remember so fondly. Things have become much grim, however as Duane (Jeff Bridges) is struggling with debt and has a large family to raise...but with the youngsters getting into constant trouble and his wife a serious alcoholic, things definitely were better in the good old days. His high school sweetheart, Jacy (a deglamorized Cybil Shepherd) comes back, however and has not had it terribly great, either. The whole town assumes they will rekindle their romance, but the spark which set things off way back when seems more nonexistent than ever now. A film seemingly made to please fans of the legendary first installment, most should agree there is much to enjoy here and it is good to see the fine characters, though they surely are not as appealing as when they were young. Good period detail and filming locations are also done well and compensate somewhat for the film's serious overlength. Perhaps negativity is done more than necessary as the characters' everyday dilemmas are tough to watch, but it still should please most viewers. The cinematic story ends here, though some characters and the town were the subjects in three additional novels by Larry McMurtry who wrote the original novel.

  • Dec 14, 2012

    I was one of the few who really liked this sequel to THE LAST PICTURE SHOW.

    I was one of the few who really liked this sequel to THE LAST PICTURE SHOW.

  • Dec 07, 2012

    Superior actors in a play without a plot. I enjoyed it because I enjoy the many top performers who were in it.

    Superior actors in a play without a plot. I enjoyed it because I enjoy the many top performers who were in it.

  • Apr 10, 2012

    decent followup to the last picture show but not nearly as fun as the first

    decent followup to the last picture show but not nearly as fun as the first

  • Apr 07, 2012

    While "Texasville" is a sequel to Bogdanovich's classic "The Last Picture Show", they are very different movies. While "The Last Picture Show" is a dark portrait of the sexual morals in the 50s, "Texasville" a colorful portrait of sexual ambivalence in the Reagan 80s. All the actors are clearly having a blast reprising their iconic roles and Bogdanovich's deft balance of drama and comedy is masterful. "Texasville" works as a sequel and also as a standalone film of love lost, middle age concerns and dealing with the sheer lunacy that life always throws your way. "Texasville" is a long forgotten gem.

    While "Texasville" is a sequel to Bogdanovich's classic "The Last Picture Show", they are very different movies. While "The Last Picture Show" is a dark portrait of the sexual morals in the 50s, "Texasville" a colorful portrait of sexual ambivalence in the Reagan 80s. All the actors are clearly having a blast reprising their iconic roles and Bogdanovich's deft balance of drama and comedy is masterful. "Texasville" works as a sequel and also as a standalone film of love lost, middle age concerns and dealing with the sheer lunacy that life always throws your way. "Texasville" is a long forgotten gem.

  • Jun 04, 2011

    More love letter than sequel to its predecessor that never quite grips you, but still leaves a lasting impression. Under-rated, but probably only for fans of The Last Picture Show.

    More love letter than sequel to its predecessor that never quite grips you, but still leaves a lasting impression. Under-rated, but probably only for fans of The Last Picture Show.