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Led by stellar performances and artfully helmed by writer-director Florian Zeller, The Father presents a devastatingly empathetic portrayal of dementia. Read critic reviews

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Movie Info

Anthony (Academy Award Winner, Anthony Hopkins) is 80, mischievous, living defiantly alone and rejecting the carers that his daughter, Anne (Academy Award and Golden Globe Winner, Olivia Colman), encouragingly introduces. Yet help is also becoming a necessity for Anne; she can't make daily visits anymore and Anthony's grip on reality is unraveling. As we experience the ebb and flow of his memory, how much of his own identity and past can Anthony cling to? How does Anne cope as she grieves the loss of her father, while he still lives and breathes before her? THE FATHER warmly embraces real life, through loving reflection upon the vibrant human condition; heart-breaking and uncompromisingly poignant -- a movie that nestles in the truth of our own lives.

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Critic Reviews for The Father

All Critics (212) | Top Critics (52) | Fresh (207) | Rotten (5)

Audience Reviews for The Father

  • 4d ago
    "I feel as if I'm losing all my leaves." (Anthony Hopkins as The Father). What a devastating masterpiece. We often talk about the "unreliable narrator," but never in the context of someone that has dementia. An absolutely incredible performance by Anthony Hopkins. He's the front-runner in my mind now. Olivia Colman as always is also fantastic. This was not what I expected. So sad and so worth watching.
    Mark B Super Reviewer
  • Feb 27, 2021
    The Father is the kind of movie I've been clamoring for years from Hollywood, an Alzheimer's empathy experiment using the rigors of a visual medium to place a viewer inside the mind of someone haunted by this debilitating mental illness. Film is inherently an immersive experience with a defined point of view, and I always thought it could be helpful in illuminating what it would be like to lose a sense of time, memory, and place as memories blend together and fragment. The Father is based on a play by director Florian Zeller. It's a deeply empathetic and heartbreaking experience that works as a puzzle to decode but also as a character piece on the end of one ordinary man's life. Not much is known about Anthony (Anthony Hopkins) before his gradual mental decline. He had an apartment he lived in for thirty years, there's definitely hints that a younger daughter had an accident and is no longer alive, and he listens to opera quite frequently. I think there's a benefit to the audience knowing so little of Anthony before his illness; we do not know what variation of this man is the honest, lucid version from before. We're only getting impressions and glimmers and some of them are non-linear, where we'll get the context of a scene after the start of a scene, so it challenges a viewer to be constantly trying to contextualize what we're seeing with what we know, and it's an ongoing puzzle to determine a slippery orientation. It makes for an engaging and constantly changing environment and one tailored to engrossing empathy. It sounds like the movie might be an overwhelming downer, and most assuredly it will leave an emotional devastation, but it's also a very fascinating experience. From the beginning, you're dropped into a scenario that announces to you not to fully trust your eyes and ears. You're trying to assess character relationships. Who is this woman? Is she Anthony's adult daughter Anne (Olivia Colman)? Is she a figment of his imagination? Is she the possibly dead daughter? Sometimes characters will be referred to by the same name but be played by different actors, and you must question which version was real, or whether either of them was? Is he projecting his dead daughter onto the face of another woman? Is he projecting an antagonistic man (Mark Gattis) onto the face of a former son-in-law (Rufus Sewell)? Which home is he in at this time? There is much to unpack here and I'm positive that additional viewings would unveil even more clues hiding in plain sight. I'm certain that the paintings on walls in backgrounds are regularly changing with the timeline, and this small detail of set design is never even emphasized. It's just one aspect of the presentation that has been thoughtfully developed to support its artistic vision. As one would expect from the premise and its beginnings as a play, this is an actor's showcase. Hopkins (The Two Popes) delivers one of the best performances of his storied career. We're so used to seeing Hopkins play men in control, dominating others. I even just re-watched him killing people in the shadows from 2001's Hannibal sequel. This is the most vulnerable the actor has ever been on screen, and I'll freely admit that by the end tears were streaming down my face as Anthony has descended into a childish state of need. Hopkins goes through a gamut of emotions and shifts rapidly. In one moment, he can be gregarious and charming, another cold and paranoid, cruel and cutting, but often he's confused and afraid. He's trying to maintain his dignity throughout. By being our focal point, we feel the same feelings that this elderly man is experiencing in this moment out of time. Colman (The Favourite) is also terrific as Anthony's put-upon daughter trying her best but reaching her limits. The accumulation of this man's experiences, and the weight of the burden on his family, is a devastating conclusion that reminds you what millions of families are going through every day. The trappings of plays adapted to film is the struggle to make them feel bigger than potent conversations happening in confined spaces. Zeller's debut as a director does a fine job of using the techniques of filmmaking to his advantage. With editing and camera placement, he can better orient or disorient an audience, and the impact of character changes has more intensity with our proximity to the actors themselves. The attention toward the visual parallels like hallway shots and people being confined to shadows present an extra layer of symbolism to be decoded. Zeller has clearly thought out how to transcend the stage and to use the immersion of film and freedom of being non-linear with editing to shape the presentation and make it even more effective. I'll be honest with you, dear reader, and that is that Alzheimer's terrifies me. We're all the accumulation of our memories and experiences, and to think those could be stripped away, muddled and tainted, and change your conception of self, well that is absolutely haunting. It's the kind of stuff that keeps me up at night, and while my maternal grandfather went through a spell of dementia before passing away at 92 years old, fortunately this illness does not run in my family. I have friends that are dealing with it currently with grandparents and it's like approaching death before the actual death, watching that version of the person you love shrink to the point where they have been replaced by a stranger, all the while you are helpless to thwart this process. For those people, The Father will hit close to home and might even be too much to handle. It's such an open-hearted and empathetic portrayal that puts you in the position of having to live with the ravages of Alzheimer's. It's so frustrating and confounding and sad, and yet film can open us all to the experiences of others like few other mediums, and The Father might be the closest any of us ever get to understanding what this terrible illness is like for those caught in its snare. It's a fantastic movie with fantastic performances but even more than that it's a wonderful experiment in empathy and understanding. Nate's Grade: A-
    Nate Z Super Reviewer

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