The Fearless Vampire Killers Reviews

  • Jun 26, 2019

    12 reasons why you must see it: Because this is a comic trip Because the whole atmosphere is hallucinating Because it's full of wonderful slapstick Because it's a Jewish vampire from the Shteitel Because of the music of Krzysztof Comda Because of the spectacular and colorful photographic work, taken in the Italian Alps Because of the genius dance scene Because of the opening scene that must be seen on the big screen Because of the gay vampire Because Roger Ebert cursed the film, gave him a star and wrote that "No one laughed, and one person sneezed after 43 minutes." Because Polanski is a wonderful actor Because Sharon Tate is in the bathroom

    12 reasons why you must see it: Because this is a comic trip Because the whole atmosphere is hallucinating Because it's full of wonderful slapstick Because it's a Jewish vampire from the Shteitel Because of the music of Krzysztof Comda Because of the spectacular and colorful photographic work, taken in the Italian Alps Because of the genius dance scene Because of the opening scene that must be seen on the big screen Because of the gay vampire Because Roger Ebert cursed the film, gave him a star and wrote that "No one laughed, and one person sneezed after 43 minutes." Because Polanski is a wonderful actor Because Sharon Tate is in the bathroom

  • Oct 21, 2018

    Dreadfully boring. Roman Polanski fails to generate any humor in what was supposed to be a spoof. (First and only viewing - 11/1/2018)

    Dreadfully boring. Roman Polanski fails to generate any humor in what was supposed to be a spoof. (First and only viewing - 11/1/2018)

  • Nov 03, 2017

    It's like Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein without Abbott and Costello and Frankenstein. Some charm, some laughs, but overall nothing special. Sharon Tate has no real reason to be in this movie other than sex appeal and the script is a mess, even if MacGowran and Polanski have nice chemistry.

    It's like Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein without Abbott and Costello and Frankenstein. Some charm, some laughs, but overall nothing special. Sharon Tate has no real reason to be in this movie other than sex appeal and the script is a mess, even if MacGowran and Polanski have nice chemistry.

  • Oct 03, 2017

    Considered a parodist alternative to the heavy-handed Hammer horror, Roman Polanski is able to take some great epic moments of its classic predecessors and turn them all upside down. This is a great collector's item for vampire fanatics. It has great scenery, great performances, and sexual overtones of many kind. Polanski's voyeuristic perspective (he's in the movie) and faux-optimistic nature plays ball with the dark comedy the movie works its magic on.

    Considered a parodist alternative to the heavy-handed Hammer horror, Roman Polanski is able to take some great epic moments of its classic predecessors and turn them all upside down. This is a great collector's item for vampire fanatics. It has great scenery, great performances, and sexual overtones of many kind. Polanski's voyeuristic perspective (he's in the movie) and faux-optimistic nature plays ball with the dark comedy the movie works its magic on.

  • Mar 23, 2017

    Fearless Vampire Killers, or Pardon Me, But Your Teeth Are in My Neck, The (1967) C-107m. ??? 1/2 D: Roman Polanski. Roman Polanski, Jack MacGowran, Sharon Tate, Ferdy Mayne, Alfie Bass. Magnificent, near-legendary horror-comedy uses usual "serious" vampire story (hungry fiends go after damsel in distress) as ploy for chief novelty: a professor and his idiotic apprentice. MacGowran and Polanski make a great bumbling team, and Tate, looking simply ravishing, has my vote for the single most lustful female presence on celluloid. One of Polanski's best; a must. Aka DANCE OF THE VAMPIRES.

    Fearless Vampire Killers, or Pardon Me, But Your Teeth Are in My Neck, The (1967) C-107m. ??? 1/2 D: Roman Polanski. Roman Polanski, Jack MacGowran, Sharon Tate, Ferdy Mayne, Alfie Bass. Magnificent, near-legendary horror-comedy uses usual "serious" vampire story (hungry fiends go after damsel in distress) as ploy for chief novelty: a professor and his idiotic apprentice. MacGowran and Polanski make a great bumbling team, and Tate, looking simply ravishing, has my vote for the single most lustful female presence on celluloid. One of Polanski's best; a must. Aka DANCE OF THE VAMPIRES.

  • Jan 31, 2017

    I really want to like this film. It looks wonderful ... "Hammeresque" one might say, but on a slightly bigger budget. I think Polanski had a flawless record up until this point. The problem I have is that this movie is terminally unfunny. It suffers from a very common problem with horror comedies ... the comedy is way too broad and obliterates any serious horror elements that might have existed. The result is a beautiful looking completely dull slog that makes me wish I was watching an actual Hammer film. (One exception ... Alfie Bass gets the only funny line in the film, and it's very funny.)

    I really want to like this film. It looks wonderful ... "Hammeresque" one might say, but on a slightly bigger budget. I think Polanski had a flawless record up until this point. The problem I have is that this movie is terminally unfunny. It suffers from a very common problem with horror comedies ... the comedy is way too broad and obliterates any serious horror elements that might have existed. The result is a beautiful looking completely dull slog that makes me wish I was watching an actual Hammer film. (One exception ... Alfie Bass gets the only funny line in the film, and it's very funny.)

  • Nov 18, 2016

    A Roman Polanski (I swear he's related to Paul "Pee-Wee Herman" Rubens) attempt at a comedic take on the Dracula lore. It's like a far less funny attempt at a Young Frankenstein kind of movie. Problem is, wasn't very funny.

    A Roman Polanski (I swear he's related to Paul "Pee-Wee Herman" Rubens) attempt at a comedic take on the Dracula lore. It's like a far less funny attempt at a Young Frankenstein kind of movie. Problem is, wasn't very funny.

  • Oct 15, 2016

    Writer/director/star Roman Polanski is one of those people like Mel Gibson who is an awful person in real life, who I always feel that I need to qualify my reviews of their work, but who's films never fail to blow me away and are among my favorites. In this film, Polanski does an amazing job of mixing fairly tale horror and slapstick comedy. Professor Abronsius and his faithful assistant Alfred (Polanski) on investigating vampirism in the mountainous regions of Transylvania. This was Polanski's first color film and was also his first major English language film, although must of the film is told visually and dialogue is kept to a minimum. Polanski is an absolute master of camera movement, as the camera sleepily drifts around the snow swept landscapes and castle parapets. The production design and overall atmosphere are spot on and feel completely unique to any other vampire film, feeling as if it is a bloody, bodice ripping, fairy tale, but with a surreal hallucinatory quality that also seems very befitting of the psychedelic 1960s. The photography by Douglas Slocombe is amazing and the music by Krzysztof Komeda, who'd later score Polanski's "Rosemary's Baby," is amazing (I need to go buy it now!). The film is filled with memorable images that have been burned into by brain, like the snowflakes falling on Tate in the bathtub, Polanski's feet hopping across the castle rooftops, or even throwaway shots like the closeup of the hunchback sliding down the hill in the coffin. The film is not as gratuitous or hard edged as the Hammer horror films and is not as goofy as AIP horror comedies aimed at children. Polanski crafted something completely original that absolutely holds up today as something smart, clever and still wonderfully unique.

    Writer/director/star Roman Polanski is one of those people like Mel Gibson who is an awful person in real life, who I always feel that I need to qualify my reviews of their work, but who's films never fail to blow me away and are among my favorites. In this film, Polanski does an amazing job of mixing fairly tale horror and slapstick comedy. Professor Abronsius and his faithful assistant Alfred (Polanski) on investigating vampirism in the mountainous regions of Transylvania. This was Polanski's first color film and was also his first major English language film, although must of the film is told visually and dialogue is kept to a minimum. Polanski is an absolute master of camera movement, as the camera sleepily drifts around the snow swept landscapes and castle parapets. The production design and overall atmosphere are spot on and feel completely unique to any other vampire film, feeling as if it is a bloody, bodice ripping, fairy tale, but with a surreal hallucinatory quality that also seems very befitting of the psychedelic 1960s. The photography by Douglas Slocombe is amazing and the music by Krzysztof Komeda, who'd later score Polanski's "Rosemary's Baby," is amazing (I need to go buy it now!). The film is filled with memorable images that have been burned into by brain, like the snowflakes falling on Tate in the bathtub, Polanski's feet hopping across the castle rooftops, or even throwaway shots like the closeup of the hunchback sliding down the hill in the coffin. The film is not as gratuitous or hard edged as the Hammer horror films and is not as goofy as AIP horror comedies aimed at children. Polanski crafted something completely original that absolutely holds up today as something smart, clever and still wonderfully unique.

  • Oct 13, 2016

    dont forget this by artsy master roman polasnkie truly pheomental

    dont forget this by artsy master roman polasnkie truly pheomental

  • Sep 28, 2016

    Someone else said that this is like if Hammer Horror made a scooby doo movie, which is a perfect description.

    Someone else said that this is like if Hammer Horror made a scooby doo movie, which is a perfect description.