The Flintstones Reviews

  • Jul 05, 2020

    Forget the excuse-plot and focus on the perfectly-crafted characters and setting.

    Forget the excuse-plot and focus on the perfectly-crafted characters and setting.

  • Jul 03, 2020

    The scenery is wonderful. Too bad the actors kept standing in front of it. Does one good casting decision (Rick Moranis) negate an awful one (Rosie O'Donnell)? The attempted humor results in more groans than chuckles.

    The scenery is wonderful. Too bad the actors kept standing in front of it. Does one good casting decision (Rick Moranis) negate an awful one (Rosie O'Donnell)? The attempted humor results in more groans than chuckles.

  • Jun 23, 2020

    this is a wonderful film. Ignore what the so called "critics" say about it. Its a faithful, fun film akin to the animated series. All performances are on par here. This film deserves more praise.

    this is a wonderful film. Ignore what the so called "critics" say about it. Its a faithful, fun film akin to the animated series. All performances are on par here. This film deserves more praise.

  • Jun 07, 2020

    One of the best movies from my childhood. Hard to find to watch though.

    One of the best movies from my childhood. Hard to find to watch though.

  • May 15, 2020

    I love the cartoon series but this movie takes the cake on classic 90s cheese. It's not the worst and it has a lot of well known people in it. It's only worth watching for the old nostalgia feel.

    I love the cartoon series but this movie takes the cake on classic 90s cheese. It's not the worst and it has a lot of well known people in it. It's only worth watching for the old nostalgia feel.

  • May 08, 2020

    I have a lot of nostalgia for this movie. I remember getting the toys and happy meals as a kid that had even more promotion for this movie. I think if you go in with a mindset that this is a pretty campy and cheesy film based on the Flintstones you may find that it is actually somewhat decent. Fred Flinstone (John Goodman) and his best friend Barney Rubble (Rick Moranis) work at the Bedrock Quarry where they are being tested by one of the companies board members Cliff Vandercave (Kyle MacLachlan) to get promoted to a better job as VP of a division of the company. Barney notices that Freds test is terrible and switched their tests to give Fred a chance. Barney feels somewhat obligated because Fred helped Barney and his wife Betty (Rosie O'Donnell) by giving them money to help adopt their son Bamm-Bamm (Hlynur Sigurasson). Fred is promoted and soon he and his wife Wilma (Elizabeth Perkins) enjoy the limelight and all the fanciness that comes with a big promotion. Meanwhile Barney and Betty start struggling after Barney is fired because the its found out he had the lowest test score. This all seems to work out, but it soon is shown that Cliff along with his secretary Miss Stone (Halle Berry) are using Fred to launder money without his knowledge. The plot is kinda out there for a kids movie, but I don't think most kids would understand exactly what money laundering really is. I found that there are some somewhat risque and adult jokes peppered into this movie that I never noticed as a kid. It actually works. The whole idea of making a live action Flintstones movie is pretty ridiculous, so if you can buy it it's not a bad film. The CG is extremely dated here (Dino looks absolutely terrible). And for the most part it's still a predictable film, but I enjoyed Goodman and Moranis as Fred and Barney. They really work well and are great versions of the cartoon. Perkins and O'Donnell truthfully don't get enough time as Wilma and Betty to really care about what happens to them. For the most part it's not a good movie, but I found it entertaining. If you've never seen it, or haven't seen it in a while give it a look. It is currently streaming on HBO.

    I have a lot of nostalgia for this movie. I remember getting the toys and happy meals as a kid that had even more promotion for this movie. I think if you go in with a mindset that this is a pretty campy and cheesy film based on the Flintstones you may find that it is actually somewhat decent. Fred Flinstone (John Goodman) and his best friend Barney Rubble (Rick Moranis) work at the Bedrock Quarry where they are being tested by one of the companies board members Cliff Vandercave (Kyle MacLachlan) to get promoted to a better job as VP of a division of the company. Barney notices that Freds test is terrible and switched their tests to give Fred a chance. Barney feels somewhat obligated because Fred helped Barney and his wife Betty (Rosie O'Donnell) by giving them money to help adopt their son Bamm-Bamm (Hlynur Sigurasson). Fred is promoted and soon he and his wife Wilma (Elizabeth Perkins) enjoy the limelight and all the fanciness that comes with a big promotion. Meanwhile Barney and Betty start struggling after Barney is fired because the its found out he had the lowest test score. This all seems to work out, but it soon is shown that Cliff along with his secretary Miss Stone (Halle Berry) are using Fred to launder money without his knowledge. The plot is kinda out there for a kids movie, but I don't think most kids would understand exactly what money laundering really is. I found that there are some somewhat risque and adult jokes peppered into this movie that I never noticed as a kid. It actually works. The whole idea of making a live action Flintstones movie is pretty ridiculous, so if you can buy it it's not a bad film. The CG is extremely dated here (Dino looks absolutely terrible). And for the most part it's still a predictable film, but I enjoyed Goodman and Moranis as Fred and Barney. They really work well and are great versions of the cartoon. Perkins and O'Donnell truthfully don't get enough time as Wilma and Betty to really care about what happens to them. For the most part it's not a good movie, but I found it entertaining. If you've never seen it, or haven't seen it in a while give it a look. It is currently streaming on HBO.

  • Mar 25, 2020

    In prehistoric suburban Bedrock, Slate & Co.'s new vice-president Cliff Vandercave (Kyle MacLachlan) and secretary Miss Sharon Stone (Halle Berry) discuss their plan to swindle the company of its vast fortune and flee, and that they need one of their employees to be responsible for it. Fred Flintstone (John Goodman) loans his best friend and neighbor Barney Rubble (Rick Moranis) money so that he and his wife Betty (Rosie O'Donnell) can adopt a little boy named Bamm-Bamm, who can only pronounce his own name. Although he's initially difficult to control because he was reared by mastodons and has super strength, he eventually warms up to his new family. Barney vows to repay his friend. Despite his mother-in-law Pearl Slaghoople's (Elizabeth Taylor) objections, Fred's wife Wilma remains supportive of his decision. Cliff holds an aptitude test; the worker with the highest mark will become the company's new vice-president. Barney gets the highest score but switches his paper with Fred, whom he knows will fail. Fred receives the promotion, but his first order is to dismiss Barney, who now effectively has the lowest score. Fred doesn't want to fire him, but Cliff tells Fred if he doesn't, he will fire Barney for him and Fred will be fired too. Fred reluctantly but willingly accepts, but does his best to help Barney support his family, even inviting the Rubbles to live with them so that they can rent out their house. However, Fred's job and newfound wealth put a strain on his relationships with Wilma (Elizabeth Perkins) and the Rubbles. Cliff eventually tricks Fred into dismissing the workers, over the objections of his office Dictabird. Later, Barney confronts Fred after seeing worker riots on the news. He reveals that he switched tests with Fred, and the Rubbles move out, despite having nowhere to live. Wilma and Pebbles also leave for her mother's house, leaving Fred behind... Rotten Tomatoes consensus states, "The Flintstones wastes beloved source material and imaginative production design on a tepid script that plunks Bedrock's favorite family into a cynical story awash with lame puns." On the syndicated television program Siskel & Ebert & the Movies, Roger Ebert of the Chicago Sun-Times and his colleague Gene Siskel of the Chicago Tribune gave the film two marginal thumbs down, with Ebert giving it 2.5 stars out of 4 and Siskel giving it 1.5 stars out of 4. They both mentioned that its main story lines (embezzlement, mother-in-law problems, office politics and extra-marital affairs) were storylines for adult films, and ones that children would not be able to understand. However, many critics praised the film's look, faithfulness to the cartoon, Rosanna Norton's costume designs and Goodman's performance. A few reviews were positive, including Time magazine which said "The Flintstones is fun", and Joel Siegel from ABC's Good Morning America and WABC-TV who called the film "pre-historical, hysterical... great fun". In a 1997 interview, Joseph Barbera, co-founder of Hanna-Barbera Productions and co-creator of The Flintstones, stated that, although he was impressed by the film's visuals, he felt the story "wasn't as good as I could have made it." You gotta love this real live action version of the classic animated tv-show "The Flintstones" that really captures the tone of the original series. Excellent production design/sets and amazing props. Great cast with Goodman, Moranis, Perkins and O'Donnell as the main characters and they truly brings life into Fred, Barney, Wilma and Betty. Re-seeing "The Flintstones" was a treat for me and so was re-seeing Halle Berry as Miss Sharon Stone... Trivia: The film, shot in California, was theatrically released on May 27, 1994, and earned almost $342 million worldwide against a $46 million budget, making it a huge box office success, despite earning negative reviews from critics. Observers criticized the storyline and tone, which they deemed too adult and mature for family audiences, as well as the casting of O'Donnell as Betty and Taylor as Pearl, but praised its visual effects, costume design, art direction, and Goodman's performance as Fred.

    In prehistoric suburban Bedrock, Slate & Co.'s new vice-president Cliff Vandercave (Kyle MacLachlan) and secretary Miss Sharon Stone (Halle Berry) discuss their plan to swindle the company of its vast fortune and flee, and that they need one of their employees to be responsible for it. Fred Flintstone (John Goodman) loans his best friend and neighbor Barney Rubble (Rick Moranis) money so that he and his wife Betty (Rosie O'Donnell) can adopt a little boy named Bamm-Bamm, who can only pronounce his own name. Although he's initially difficult to control because he was reared by mastodons and has super strength, he eventually warms up to his new family. Barney vows to repay his friend. Despite his mother-in-law Pearl Slaghoople's (Elizabeth Taylor) objections, Fred's wife Wilma remains supportive of his decision. Cliff holds an aptitude test; the worker with the highest mark will become the company's new vice-president. Barney gets the highest score but switches his paper with Fred, whom he knows will fail. Fred receives the promotion, but his first order is to dismiss Barney, who now effectively has the lowest score. Fred doesn't want to fire him, but Cliff tells Fred if he doesn't, he will fire Barney for him and Fred will be fired too. Fred reluctantly but willingly accepts, but does his best to help Barney support his family, even inviting the Rubbles to live with them so that they can rent out their house. However, Fred's job and newfound wealth put a strain on his relationships with Wilma (Elizabeth Perkins) and the Rubbles. Cliff eventually tricks Fred into dismissing the workers, over the objections of his office Dictabird. Later, Barney confronts Fred after seeing worker riots on the news. He reveals that he switched tests with Fred, and the Rubbles move out, despite having nowhere to live. Wilma and Pebbles also leave for her mother's house, leaving Fred behind... Rotten Tomatoes consensus states, "The Flintstones wastes beloved source material and imaginative production design on a tepid script that plunks Bedrock's favorite family into a cynical story awash with lame puns." On the syndicated television program Siskel & Ebert & the Movies, Roger Ebert of the Chicago Sun-Times and his colleague Gene Siskel of the Chicago Tribune gave the film two marginal thumbs down, with Ebert giving it 2.5 stars out of 4 and Siskel giving it 1.5 stars out of 4. They both mentioned that its main story lines (embezzlement, mother-in-law problems, office politics and extra-marital affairs) were storylines for adult films, and ones that children would not be able to understand. However, many critics praised the film's look, faithfulness to the cartoon, Rosanna Norton's costume designs and Goodman's performance. A few reviews were positive, including Time magazine which said "The Flintstones is fun", and Joel Siegel from ABC's Good Morning America and WABC-TV who called the film "pre-historical, hysterical... great fun". In a 1997 interview, Joseph Barbera, co-founder of Hanna-Barbera Productions and co-creator of The Flintstones, stated that, although he was impressed by the film's visuals, he felt the story "wasn't as good as I could have made it." You gotta love this real live action version of the classic animated tv-show "The Flintstones" that really captures the tone of the original series. Excellent production design/sets and amazing props. Great cast with Goodman, Moranis, Perkins and O'Donnell as the main characters and they truly brings life into Fred, Barney, Wilma and Betty. Re-seeing "The Flintstones" was a treat for me and so was re-seeing Halle Berry as Miss Sharon Stone... Trivia: The film, shot in California, was theatrically released on May 27, 1994, and earned almost $342 million worldwide against a $46 million budget, making it a huge box office success, despite earning negative reviews from critics. Observers criticized the storyline and tone, which they deemed too adult and mature for family audiences, as well as the casting of O'Donnell as Betty and Taylor as Pearl, but praised its visual effects, costume design, art direction, and Goodman's performance as Fred.

  • Dec 07, 2019

    Its one of those movies where the acting and scenery and special effects are great but it just does work.You just can't convert a cartoon into a live action show.

    Its one of those movies where the acting and scenery and special effects are great but it just does work.You just can't convert a cartoon into a live action show.

  • Nov 01, 2019

    It's not a film you watch for the storyline, it's a film you watch just to see how they would manage to transfer the goofy cartoon into a live-action film. Turns out they mainly relied on papier mâchée and heavy overacting. Meh.

    It's not a film you watch for the storyline, it's a film you watch just to see how they would manage to transfer the goofy cartoon into a live-action film. Turns out they mainly relied on papier mâchée and heavy overacting. Meh.

  • Oct 20, 2019

    Is not that good but not that bad either.

    Is not that good but not that bad either.