The Impossible Reviews

  • Jan 13, 2020

    This movie was troubling and very real. Naomi Watts takes on some of the toughest and gritty roles and does them great. Disturbing movie - was very good

    This movie was troubling and very real. Naomi Watts takes on some of the toughest and gritty roles and does them great. Disturbing movie - was very good

  • Jan 03, 2020

    Such a beautiful story. It puts hope to another level, that has not been reached before. I was crying so friggin' hard at the end. Fresh to the core!

    Such a beautiful story. It puts hope to another level, that has not been reached before. I was crying so friggin' hard at the end. Fresh to the core!

  • Nov 26, 2019

    A movie that has you on the edge of your seat with seat from beginning to end, The Impossible is a new career high for Naomi Watts who steals the show in this heart-wrenching true story. Furthermore, hats off to Ewan McGregor and Tom Holland for exceptional performances.

    A movie that has you on the edge of your seat with seat from beginning to end, The Impossible is a new career high for Naomi Watts who steals the show in this heart-wrenching true story. Furthermore, hats off to Ewan McGregor and Tom Holland for exceptional performances.

  • Oct 26, 2019

    Impossibly boring. The good ratings inexplicable. I can't make myself care about Naomi Watts. This film is predictable, plodding, and not entertaining.

    Impossibly boring. The good ratings inexplicable. I can't make myself care about Naomi Watts. This film is predictable, plodding, and not entertaining.

  • Oct 17, 2019

    The Impossible is a gut punch of a movie, and that experience is only intensified when you realize it’s all based on a true story. I think it’s a human flaw that we often fail to recognize the level of tragedy that other people face unless we can see it first-hand. Sure, I know there are people suffering in different regions of the globe, but like it or not those things tend to be out-of-sight-out-of-mind. This film shows you the level of destruction that the Indian Ocean tsunami caused back in 2004, and how that ripped apart families in mere moments. Assuming all the disaster we see in this film is created using miniatures or digital effects, I have to applaud the film-makers for capturing such an authentic wave of water. I felt like I was there in the thick of this nightmare, and watched as everything in its path was destroyed. I also appreciated how the film highlights the humanity of people when they all have been devastated by something like this tsunami. We see that everyone pulls together and wants to help others. It’s not full of selfish people, or those taking advantage of the situation. Instead it shows that there can still be unconditional good in mankind when faced with these extreme circumstances. The Impossible is also tough to watch because they take this massive disaster that struck more than a dozen countries, and personalized it by telling the tale of one family in particular. We don’t get a ton of time to get to know this family of 5 before tragedy strikes, but I don’t know if we needed that much. The film works simply because we want to see a mother and child stay together. We feel for them as they have to face losing the rest of the family, and we can’t bear the thought of this child being left alone. It all resonates and the movie continues to hit you with more surprises that made me sob. I burned through more than a few tissues with this film, because it has so many emotional moments, and I felt them with an intensity that is rare for me when watching a movie. The acting was stellar across the board, and it was exciting to see how great Tom Holland was years before donning a superhero suit. Any complaints I have about the way certain events play out, or how the characters behave are instantly vetoed in my mind since the film is based on a true story. The Impossible is a movie that took me through some heavy emotions and that will be tough to endure again, but I must admit it has been on my mind for days because it was that affecting.

    The Impossible is a gut punch of a movie, and that experience is only intensified when you realize it’s all based on a true story. I think it’s a human flaw that we often fail to recognize the level of tragedy that other people face unless we can see it first-hand. Sure, I know there are people suffering in different regions of the globe, but like it or not those things tend to be out-of-sight-out-of-mind. This film shows you the level of destruction that the Indian Ocean tsunami caused back in 2004, and how that ripped apart families in mere moments. Assuming all the disaster we see in this film is created using miniatures or digital effects, I have to applaud the film-makers for capturing such an authentic wave of water. I felt like I was there in the thick of this nightmare, and watched as everything in its path was destroyed. I also appreciated how the film highlights the humanity of people when they all have been devastated by something like this tsunami. We see that everyone pulls together and wants to help others. It’s not full of selfish people, or those taking advantage of the situation. Instead it shows that there can still be unconditional good in mankind when faced with these extreme circumstances. The Impossible is also tough to watch because they take this massive disaster that struck more than a dozen countries, and personalized it by telling the tale of one family in particular. We don’t get a ton of time to get to know this family of 5 before tragedy strikes, but I don’t know if we needed that much. The film works simply because we want to see a mother and child stay together. We feel for them as they have to face losing the rest of the family, and we can’t bear the thought of this child being left alone. It all resonates and the movie continues to hit you with more surprises that made me sob. I burned through more than a few tissues with this film, because it has so many emotional moments, and I felt them with an intensity that is rare for me when watching a movie. The acting was stellar across the board, and it was exciting to see how great Tom Holland was years before donning a superhero suit. Any complaints I have about the way certain events play out, or how the characters behave are instantly vetoed in my mind since the film is based on a true story. The Impossible is a movie that took me through some heavy emotions and that will be tough to endure again, but I must admit it has been on my mind for days because it was that affecting.

  • Sep 08, 2019

    The disaster movie genre is usually associated with the cheap, star studded productions of the 1970s like The Towering Inferno (1974) and Airport (1970) but this is a more intelligent, subtle take on the genre. Director J.A. Bayona is mostly associated with horror films such as The Orphanage (2007) and A Monster Calls (2016) but he doesn't go for cheap thrills here as he builds up the familial relationships and the human cost of this tragedy. We really do want to see the members of this family survive as we are let into their family dynamics and can care for them as human beings not just sufferers. It's not a masterpiece but when considering it's relatively low ambitions it hits all the marks. Happily married couple Maria, Naomi Watts, and Henry Bennett, Ewan McGregor, struggle to raise their three sons particularly the unruly Lucas, Tom Holland. When they go to Khao Lak, Thailand on holiday tensions arise between Maria and Lucas but a giant tsunami on Boxing Day leaves Henry and sons Thomas, Samuel Joslin, and Simon, Oaklee Pendergast, separated from Maria and Lucas. Maria and Lucas eventually find one another and Maria struggles to keep herself and her son alive as she has major injuries and they cannot find any other people. They pick up a vulnerable toddler called Daniel, Johan Sundberg, increasing Maria's responsibilities while Henry frantically searches for his wife and child. Eventually the family is reunited. Watts, who received an Academy Award nomination for her performance, is the real stand out as she gives an intense physical performance that convinces us of this character's will to survive. One shot from the film, which will probably stay with me forever, displays her leg with a terrifyingly deep gash cut into it, blood oozing out of it and clumps of dirt mixed in amongst her blood and yet she continues walking. Part of what makes the shot so affecting is that Watts' face has a deeply pained and yet resolute expression as she leads her most difficult son through a destroyed landscape in the hope of finding some place to keep him safe. Also effecting is the fact that her son, who had previously disrespected her, witnesses her incredible sacrifice and ambition to keep him safe. This is an experience that most children will have had as they realize the capability of their mothers to keep striving simply to keep their child safe. Watts is incredibly natural as a mother who loves her children, careful not to overplay the early scenes but she really comes alive later in the film when she uses her physicality to tell us everything we need to know about this woman. There are times when the story feels rather scant and it probably could have been a tight ninety minutes instead of an hour and 53 minutes but you do take a certain fear of the elements away from this film that many disaster films do not inspire. The Towering Inferno did not make me afraid of having a giant fire ravage my house as all of the characters were far too colorful to be sympathetic or believable and the plot beats too improbable for any audience member to really invest. Here the family presented seems fairly normal and it is easy to have sympathy for them as they face horrific injuries and long to be reunited. The execution of the disaster itself is also fantastic as the terrifying first tidal wave and the way that it strikes the various characters seems realistic and strikes fear into the hearts of viewers. Great special effects are commonplace nowadays as they are present in almost every big Hollywood blockbuster but when considering how many films of this ilk don't quite get it right it is worth noting the fact that the tsunami appears very real and very scary. This isn't an incredible film by any stretch of the imagination and it may be a tad too generic for audiences looking for deeper exploration of damaged mother-son relationships but as a simple of story of survival it stands up to scrutiny. Enjoy this instead of The Cassandra Crossing (1976) and Earthquake (1974) because it does everything those films struggle to do very well.

    The disaster movie genre is usually associated with the cheap, star studded productions of the 1970s like The Towering Inferno (1974) and Airport (1970) but this is a more intelligent, subtle take on the genre. Director J.A. Bayona is mostly associated with horror films such as The Orphanage (2007) and A Monster Calls (2016) but he doesn't go for cheap thrills here as he builds up the familial relationships and the human cost of this tragedy. We really do want to see the members of this family survive as we are let into their family dynamics and can care for them as human beings not just sufferers. It's not a masterpiece but when considering it's relatively low ambitions it hits all the marks. Happily married couple Maria, Naomi Watts, and Henry Bennett, Ewan McGregor, struggle to raise their three sons particularly the unruly Lucas, Tom Holland. When they go to Khao Lak, Thailand on holiday tensions arise between Maria and Lucas but a giant tsunami on Boxing Day leaves Henry and sons Thomas, Samuel Joslin, and Simon, Oaklee Pendergast, separated from Maria and Lucas. Maria and Lucas eventually find one another and Maria struggles to keep herself and her son alive as she has major injuries and they cannot find any other people. They pick up a vulnerable toddler called Daniel, Johan Sundberg, increasing Maria's responsibilities while Henry frantically searches for his wife and child. Eventually the family is reunited. Watts, who received an Academy Award nomination for her performance, is the real stand out as she gives an intense physical performance that convinces us of this character's will to survive. One shot from the film, which will probably stay with me forever, displays her leg with a terrifyingly deep gash cut into it, blood oozing out of it and clumps of dirt mixed in amongst her blood and yet she continues walking. Part of what makes the shot so affecting is that Watts' face has a deeply pained and yet resolute expression as she leads her most difficult son through a destroyed landscape in the hope of finding some place to keep him safe. Also effecting is the fact that her son, who had previously disrespected her, witnesses her incredible sacrifice and ambition to keep him safe. This is an experience that most children will have had as they realize the capability of their mothers to keep striving simply to keep their child safe. Watts is incredibly natural as a mother who loves her children, careful not to overplay the early scenes but she really comes alive later in the film when she uses her physicality to tell us everything we need to know about this woman. There are times when the story feels rather scant and it probably could have been a tight ninety minutes instead of an hour and 53 minutes but you do take a certain fear of the elements away from this film that many disaster films do not inspire. The Towering Inferno did not make me afraid of having a giant fire ravage my house as all of the characters were far too colorful to be sympathetic or believable and the plot beats too improbable for any audience member to really invest. Here the family presented seems fairly normal and it is easy to have sympathy for them as they face horrific injuries and long to be reunited. The execution of the disaster itself is also fantastic as the terrifying first tidal wave and the way that it strikes the various characters seems realistic and strikes fear into the hearts of viewers. Great special effects are commonplace nowadays as they are present in almost every big Hollywood blockbuster but when considering how many films of this ilk don't quite get it right it is worth noting the fact that the tsunami appears very real and very scary. This isn't an incredible film by any stretch of the imagination and it may be a tad too generic for audiences looking for deeper exploration of damaged mother-son relationships but as a simple of story of survival it stands up to scrutiny. Enjoy this instead of The Cassandra Crossing (1976) and Earthquake (1974) because it does everything those films struggle to do very well.

  • Sep 03, 2019

    Powerful family/disaster story

    Powerful family/disaster story

  • Aug 17, 2019

    Wow. What an amazing filim. Had me and my partner in tears and excitement !

    Wow. What an amazing filim. Had me and my partner in tears and excitement !

  • Jul 06, 2019

    Beautifully made movie. Most real life stories are turned into over dramatic Hollywood movies, but this movie was not that. It was genuine and heartfelt. Not over dramatic and fake. The acting was so amazing you will bawl your eyes out. Beautiful story of a beautiful family and their strength.

    Beautifully made movie. Most real life stories are turned into over dramatic Hollywood movies, but this movie was not that. It was genuine and heartfelt. Not over dramatic and fake. The acting was so amazing you will bawl your eyes out. Beautiful story of a beautiful family and their strength.

  • Jul 04, 2019

    The acting is breathtaking!! One of the best movies I've seen in a long time, felt very real but also very hard to watch.

    The acting is breathtaking!! One of the best movies I've seen in a long time, felt very real but also very hard to watch.