The Other Son Reviews

  • May 23, 2020

    what an amazing movie! such a simple story but comes with the strongest message a film can deliver: no matter what origin or religion, we are all humans who want to be accepted and be loved, and thats all what counts in the end. great new perspective on the gaza conflict. how beautiful would that be if all would act like those two boys in that story.

    what an amazing movie! such a simple story but comes with the strongest message a film can deliver: no matter what origin or religion, we are all humans who want to be accepted and be loved, and thats all what counts in the end. great new perspective on the gaza conflict. how beautiful would that be if all would act like those two boys in that story.

  • Apr 01, 2020

    Stories centered on the plot element of children switched at birth are not that new to the worlds of television and movies. Any number of stories has been crafted both for the big screen and small for decades with this plot element at their center. So the question is raised now in the 21st Century, how does one go about crafting a story based in this tried and true element without being trite? The answer: Cohen Media Group's new movie, The Other Son. The Other Son is at its most basic of roots, less a story of babies switched at birth than a political statement of sorts. It presents the story of Joseph and Yacine (played respectively by Jules Sitruk and Mehdi Dehbi). One is Palestinian. The other is Israeli. The pair was switched at birth by pure accident during the Gulf War. The result was that one grew up Israeli when he should have been Palestinian and vice versa. The resultant effect is that both bys' parents find out when the boys have both grown up, as do the boys themselves, leading to some very mixed emotions among them. The boys' parents take the news especially hard. That's not to say that the boys don't take the news hard. But in meeting one another, they get along quite better than their parents. The dichotomy of the two situations is its own statement. The contradiction of how the parents and sons handle one another goes into the deeper, more social message that it shouldn't matter whether one is Palestinian or Israeli. People are people, and can still get along. It seems cheesy, yes. But in a region that has been ravaged by war for decades, this is a message that is relevant even today. Even being a foreign language film, it's one that audiences of any nationality will appreciate for this message. This includes Middle Eastern audiences along the entire West Bank. The story does a relatively good job of portraying the two different lifestyles of the Palestinian and Israeli families and their lifestyles. Though, one could argue that there might actually be a slight bias here as those on the Israeli side are portrayed as having a better lifestyle and living conditions than the Palestinians. Of course that is merely a matter of one critic's interpretation. It doesn't necessarily mean that that is the case. Though it is sure to generate discussion, which in itself is not necessarily a bad thing. Any time that discussion over the ongoing tensions in the West Bank is raised, it's a good thing. And speaking of discussion, the story's end will generate just as much discussion among viewers, if not more. The story is left open-ended through its conclusion. And while some may complain about that since it isn't wrapped up with a pretty bow on top, the story's final statement—made through voice over—brings full circle the statement about it not mattering who one is or one's roots. It re-states that we it is possible to overcome the past and live together peacefully. Yes, it's something of a hippy-esque message. But it's one that will always be relevant as evidenced in this story that although it's a foreign language film, is worth at least one watch.

    Stories centered on the plot element of children switched at birth are not that new to the worlds of television and movies. Any number of stories has been crafted both for the big screen and small for decades with this plot element at their center. So the question is raised now in the 21st Century, how does one go about crafting a story based in this tried and true element without being trite? The answer: Cohen Media Group's new movie, The Other Son. The Other Son is at its most basic of roots, less a story of babies switched at birth than a political statement of sorts. It presents the story of Joseph and Yacine (played respectively by Jules Sitruk and Mehdi Dehbi). One is Palestinian. The other is Israeli. The pair was switched at birth by pure accident during the Gulf War. The result was that one grew up Israeli when he should have been Palestinian and vice versa. The resultant effect is that both bys' parents find out when the boys have both grown up, as do the boys themselves, leading to some very mixed emotions among them. The boys' parents take the news especially hard. That's not to say that the boys don't take the news hard. But in meeting one another, they get along quite better than their parents. The dichotomy of the two situations is its own statement. The contradiction of how the parents and sons handle one another goes into the deeper, more social message that it shouldn't matter whether one is Palestinian or Israeli. People are people, and can still get along. It seems cheesy, yes. But in a region that has been ravaged by war for decades, this is a message that is relevant even today. Even being a foreign language film, it's one that audiences of any nationality will appreciate for this message. This includes Middle Eastern audiences along the entire West Bank. The story does a relatively good job of portraying the two different lifestyles of the Palestinian and Israeli families and their lifestyles. Though, one could argue that there might actually be a slight bias here as those on the Israeli side are portrayed as having a better lifestyle and living conditions than the Palestinians. Of course that is merely a matter of one critic's interpretation. It doesn't necessarily mean that that is the case. Though it is sure to generate discussion, which in itself is not necessarily a bad thing. Any time that discussion over the ongoing tensions in the West Bank is raised, it's a good thing. And speaking of discussion, the story's end will generate just as much discussion among viewers, if not more. The story is left open-ended through its conclusion. And while some may complain about that since it isn't wrapped up with a pretty bow on top, the story's final statement—made through voice over—brings full circle the statement about it not mattering who one is or one's roots. It re-states that we it is possible to overcome the past and live together peacefully. Yes, it's something of a hippy-esque message. But it's one that will always be relevant as evidenced in this story that although it's a foreign language film, is worth at least one watch.

  • Dec 18, 2016

    Well developed, interesting chatacters and plot elevate this movie. Very endearing and personal while acknowledging the political realities underlying the main plot. Well worth watching.

    Well developed, interesting chatacters and plot elevate this movie. Very endearing and personal while acknowledging the political realities underlying the main plot. Well worth watching.

  • Apr 27, 2015

    I just happened to see this film while channel surfing HBO last night. This story,about about two college aged boys, one Palestinian the other Israeli switched accidentally in the hospital at birth, seems so incredibly improbable as to have no chance of being a believable film. But , against all expectations it is more than believable; it is a good, sensitive and very human movie. Thought provoking, it avoids sentimentality but remains a warm touching exploration of two families working through a situation difficult under any circumstances, let alone in the setting of the Palestinian / Israeli conflict. Beautifully done; succeeding on many levels, I heartily recommend this to anyone who feels even the smallest interest and empathy for the human element on both sides caught in the difficult nature of the current hostilities. It is not a perfect movie, but the excellence of the script, performances and direction overcome the movie's flaws and make it well worth seeing.

    I just happened to see this film while channel surfing HBO last night. This story,about about two college aged boys, one Palestinian the other Israeli switched accidentally in the hospital at birth, seems so incredibly improbable as to have no chance of being a believable film. But , against all expectations it is more than believable; it is a good, sensitive and very human movie. Thought provoking, it avoids sentimentality but remains a warm touching exploration of two families working through a situation difficult under any circumstances, let alone in the setting of the Palestinian / Israeli conflict. Beautifully done; succeeding on many levels, I heartily recommend this to anyone who feels even the smallest interest and empathy for the human element on both sides caught in the difficult nature of the current hostilities. It is not a perfect movie, but the excellence of the script, performances and direction overcome the movie's flaws and make it well worth seeing.

  • Mar 04, 2015

    What a well done story that hits at so many levels! Imagine finding out that you are suddenly not who you are and this even effects how your loved ones perceive you. Nature, nurture, and more.

    What a well done story that hits at so many levels! Imagine finding out that you are suddenly not who you are and this even effects how your loved ones perceive you. Nature, nurture, and more.

  • Jul 24, 2014

    Babies switched at birth is an ancient story device (done to death by Bollywood film) but what happens if they go to a Palestinian and an Israeli family? Beautiful humanist film that explores the 'nature vs. nurture' debate and examines how identity is defined and shaped.

    Babies switched at birth is an ancient story device (done to death by Bollywood film) but what happens if they go to a Palestinian and an Israeli family? Beautiful humanist film that explores the 'nature vs. nurture' debate and examines how identity is defined and shaped.

  • Jun 27, 2014

    One of my all time favorite films. ISRAELI is really Palestinian and PALESTINIAN is really Israeli... they find this out as teenagers.

    One of my all time favorite films. ISRAELI is really Palestinian and PALESTINIAN is really Israeli... they find this out as teenagers.

  • Jun 10, 2014

    A moving story which shows that hate and religion are two sides of the same coin. Lovely premise and wonderfully unfolds a tale of two cities.

    A moving story which shows that hate and religion are two sides of the same coin. Lovely premise and wonderfully unfolds a tale of two cities.

  • Mar 27, 2014

    An interesting story about two boys accindentally switched at birth. The story's getting more interesting when they're parents finally found out the truth, especially when one's Israeli and the other Palestinien. Interesting and we'll acted, but I'm hoping for a better ending. If you're looking for a nice-lightweight-drama, you should see this. I'm not saying you must, but you should. My Rating : 3.5/5

    An interesting story about two boys accindentally switched at birth. The story's getting more interesting when they're parents finally found out the truth, especially when one's Israeli and the other Palestinien. Interesting and we'll acted, but I'm hoping for a better ending. If you're looking for a nice-lightweight-drama, you should see this. I'm not saying you must, but you should. My Rating : 3.5/5

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    Dan S Super Reviewer
    Jan 20, 2014

    An intriguing, well acted story about two boys accidentally switched at birth, and how they and their families discover the truth after one of them applies to be in the military. This is a fascinating coming of age movie concerning identity, religion, politics, and allegiance to one's country, and how to deal with an impossible situation with no simple solution. As said, the acting is really solid, and the handle director Lorraine Levy has on his material is evident. The story hits a few lulls once in a while, but for most of its running time it is arresting, original, and ultimately pretty heart-breaking, even though it ends as positively as it possibly can given the circumstances of the boys and their families.

    An intriguing, well acted story about two boys accidentally switched at birth, and how they and their families discover the truth after one of them applies to be in the military. This is a fascinating coming of age movie concerning identity, religion, politics, and allegiance to one's country, and how to deal with an impossible situation with no simple solution. As said, the acting is really solid, and the handle director Lorraine Levy has on his material is evident. The story hits a few lulls once in a while, but for most of its running time it is arresting, original, and ultimately pretty heart-breaking, even though it ends as positively as it possibly can given the circumstances of the boys and their families.