The Wind Rises Reviews

  • Mar 29, 2021

    The wind is rising, we all must live. Since Hayao Miyazaki loved flying, which was made abundantly clear in Porco Rosso and others, this movie felt like his passion project, as well as a tribute. The story was a factionalized version of the real life Jiro Horikoshi, who designed the Japanese Zero airplane during World War II. I loved how Miyazaki portrayed Horikoshi as a kind person who had a dream of building airplane as a kid, and tried to maintain that passion as an actual engineer. The director also showed the main character did not care about the politic or war, but just wanted to make beautiful airplanes for the sake of flying. This led to one of the themes, which was the struggle to maintain a dream, and keeping the dream pure. Another theme was the purpose of airplanes. In a time of war, it was inevitable that airplanes became tools of destruction. Here, Hayao wanted to emphasize that this was not the main purpose. As a person who is obsessed with flying and disdains war, he made his intention quite clear. Another aspect of Horikoshi was the romance with his partner, Naoko. The romance was beautifully and realistically portrayed. They were just young birds that loved and wanted to be with each other. As sweet as the romance was, their story was tragic and heartbreaking. These two aspects of Horikoshi's fictionalized life led to the movie's biggest theme, which was to keep living life to the fullest. My small problems with the movie were some pacing issues, and at the beginning the time jumps were a bit sudden. It took a bit for me to realize that some years had already passed between scenes. Overall, another Hayao Miyazaki's passion project and beautiful movie. 8.5/10

    The wind is rising, we all must live. Since Hayao Miyazaki loved flying, which was made abundantly clear in Porco Rosso and others, this movie felt like his passion project, as well as a tribute. The story was a factionalized version of the real life Jiro Horikoshi, who designed the Japanese Zero airplane during World War II. I loved how Miyazaki portrayed Horikoshi as a kind person who had a dream of building airplane as a kid, and tried to maintain that passion as an actual engineer. The director also showed the main character did not care about the politic or war, but just wanted to make beautiful airplanes for the sake of flying. This led to one of the themes, which was the struggle to maintain a dream, and keeping the dream pure. Another theme was the purpose of airplanes. In a time of war, it was inevitable that airplanes became tools of destruction. Here, Hayao wanted to emphasize that this was not the main purpose. As a person who is obsessed with flying and disdains war, he made his intention quite clear. Another aspect of Horikoshi was the romance with his partner, Naoko. The romance was beautifully and realistically portrayed. They were just young birds that loved and wanted to be with each other. As sweet as the romance was, their story was tragic and heartbreaking. These two aspects of Horikoshi's fictionalized life led to the movie's biggest theme, which was to keep living life to the fullest. My small problems with the movie were some pacing issues, and at the beginning the time jumps were a bit sudden. It took a bit for me to realize that some years had already passed between scenes. Overall, another Hayao Miyazaki's passion project and beautiful movie. 8.5/10

  • Mar 07, 2021

    A hard to grasp movie that will leave you floating and thoughtful.

    A hard to grasp movie that will leave you floating and thoughtful.

  • Feb 24, 2021

    The Wind Rises (2013) is Hayao Miyazaki's last film before he announced his retirement. The film is based on the life story of Jirō Horikoshi, who designed the Zero fighter jet during World War II. In the film, Miyazaki was influenced by Horikoshi, as well as by his father, who had a wartime factory that produced aircraft parts. Even though a fighter jet is at the center of the film, Miyazaki aims to show the design and production process of the aircraft as technological development, rather than a militarist one. After the movie was released, Miyazaki was criticized by different circles. South Korean audiences opposed the glorification of the designer of the warplane, one of the symbols of Japanese militarism, and the disregard for forced Korean workers to build these planes. On the other hand, the nationalists in Japan also accused Miyazaki of treason for emphasizing the futility of war in the film.[1] Full review: https://guncesinema.com/en/as-the-wind-rises/

    The Wind Rises (2013) is Hayao Miyazaki's last film before he announced his retirement. The film is based on the life story of Jirō Horikoshi, who designed the Zero fighter jet during World War II. In the film, Miyazaki was influenced by Horikoshi, as well as by his father, who had a wartime factory that produced aircraft parts. Even though a fighter jet is at the center of the film, Miyazaki aims to show the design and production process of the aircraft as technological development, rather than a militarist one. After the movie was released, Miyazaki was criticized by different circles. South Korean audiences opposed the glorification of the designer of the warplane, one of the symbols of Japanese militarism, and the disregard for forced Korean workers to build these planes. On the other hand, the nationalists in Japan also accused Miyazaki of treason for emphasizing the futility of war in the film.[1] Full review: https://guncesinema.com/en/as-the-wind-rises/

  • Jan 05, 2021

    Adoration for flight in anime form. Hayao Miyazaki's historical romance drama anime The Wind Rises (2013) is a beautiful farewell to the greatest animation director of our time. Miyazaki's legendary run of directing anime films is untouchable with Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind, Castle in the Sky, My Neighbor Totoro, Kiki's Delivery Service, Porco Rosso, Princess Mononoke, Spirited Away, Howl's Moving Castle, Ponyo, and now The Wind Rises. It's a fitting endcap to his pictures that all feature Miyazaki's fascination with flying, love of planes and airships, and the wind itself. I appreciate that Miyazaki wanted to direct a serious period drama as his last directorial feature. Hayao Miyazaki's writing is loving in nature with his clear love of flying and appreciation for the company of a good woman as the focus of the film. The hero's need for inventing Japan's next great plane is riveting as you slowly realize that he should just appreciate the time he gets with his lady love and the art of aeronautical engineering. I think Miyazaki's anti-war themes bleed in here as you witness great airplanes being used to gun people down for warfare. I think Miyazaki's writing is very sensitive to the fact that his beloved planes were used to kill en mass. The Wind Rises is a gorgeous art film about Japan's modernization into metal fighter planes, launching into warfare, and romance with heartfelt affection. The Wind Rises is easily Miyazaki's most emotional, tragic, and heartfelt picture. He gets you to care about a boy turning into a man, who finds love, only to have limited time with her. It's a fantastic story and the harrowing ending as you realize these planes are only really made for combat is a perceptive moment of Miyazaki's understanding of the true nature of the cost of technological advances. Hayao Miyazaki's The Wind Rises is a perfect film with patient maturity, kind behavior, and thoughtful pleasure found in the simplest of things. Joe Hisaishi's score is lovely with an airy breeze to his gentle music this time around. His scores for Hayao Miyazaki's films have long captivated me and The Wind Rises is full of equally majestic and romantic themes. I really like the sound designers use of mouth noises for all the sound effects like taking off or turning the plane engines on with a rumble. It's a very cute choice, adding to The Wind Rises' charm. Takeshi Seyama's editing is excellent as he keeps The Wind Rises steadily moving with a sincere authenticity to each scene's dramatic pacing for 126 breezy minutes. Atsushi Okui's cinematography is striking with close-ups as winds blow intensely on a character or far wide shots for an earthquake wrecking an entire city. Yoji Takeshige's art direction is gorgeous with a dedication to older eras of Japan, the history of airplanes, and sweeping winds blowing things around. Studio Ghibli's hand drawn animation is more detailed and technically advanced than any other Miyazaki movie. Furthermore, I definitely liked the English Dub's cast for The Wind Rises. Joseph Gordon-Levitt is a vulnerable and endearing lead choice. Emily Blunt sounds so sweet and loving as his wife. Stanley Tucci makes for a likable and compelling Italian plane engineer. Martin Short is hilarious as the feisty plane engineer boss with a nice Jennifer Grey cameo as his kind wife. Lastly, Werner Herzog's cameo as a German defector is astonishing and full of captivating dialogue and vocal performances. In conclusion, I loved Hayao Miyazaki's The Wind Rises. I think audiences will look back fondly on it one day like a friendly gust of wind blowing your hair.

    Adoration for flight in anime form. Hayao Miyazaki's historical romance drama anime The Wind Rises (2013) is a beautiful farewell to the greatest animation director of our time. Miyazaki's legendary run of directing anime films is untouchable with Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind, Castle in the Sky, My Neighbor Totoro, Kiki's Delivery Service, Porco Rosso, Princess Mononoke, Spirited Away, Howl's Moving Castle, Ponyo, and now The Wind Rises. It's a fitting endcap to his pictures that all feature Miyazaki's fascination with flying, love of planes and airships, and the wind itself. I appreciate that Miyazaki wanted to direct a serious period drama as his last directorial feature. Hayao Miyazaki's writing is loving in nature with his clear love of flying and appreciation for the company of a good woman as the focus of the film. The hero's need for inventing Japan's next great plane is riveting as you slowly realize that he should just appreciate the time he gets with his lady love and the art of aeronautical engineering. I think Miyazaki's anti-war themes bleed in here as you witness great airplanes being used to gun people down for warfare. I think Miyazaki's writing is very sensitive to the fact that his beloved planes were used to kill en mass. The Wind Rises is a gorgeous art film about Japan's modernization into metal fighter planes, launching into warfare, and romance with heartfelt affection. The Wind Rises is easily Miyazaki's most emotional, tragic, and heartfelt picture. He gets you to care about a boy turning into a man, who finds love, only to have limited time with her. It's a fantastic story and the harrowing ending as you realize these planes are only really made for combat is a perceptive moment of Miyazaki's understanding of the true nature of the cost of technological advances. Hayao Miyazaki's The Wind Rises is a perfect film with patient maturity, kind behavior, and thoughtful pleasure found in the simplest of things. Joe Hisaishi's score is lovely with an airy breeze to his gentle music this time around. His scores for Hayao Miyazaki's films have long captivated me and The Wind Rises is full of equally majestic and romantic themes. I really like the sound designers use of mouth noises for all the sound effects like taking off or turning the plane engines on with a rumble. It's a very cute choice, adding to The Wind Rises' charm. Takeshi Seyama's editing is excellent as he keeps The Wind Rises steadily moving with a sincere authenticity to each scene's dramatic pacing for 126 breezy minutes. Atsushi Okui's cinematography is striking with close-ups as winds blow intensely on a character or far wide shots for an earthquake wrecking an entire city. Yoji Takeshige's art direction is gorgeous with a dedication to older eras of Japan, the history of airplanes, and sweeping winds blowing things around. Studio Ghibli's hand drawn animation is more detailed and technically advanced than any other Miyazaki movie. Furthermore, I definitely liked the English Dub's cast for The Wind Rises. Joseph Gordon-Levitt is a vulnerable and endearing lead choice. Emily Blunt sounds so sweet and loving as his wife. Stanley Tucci makes for a likable and compelling Italian plane engineer. Martin Short is hilarious as the feisty plane engineer boss with a nice Jennifer Grey cameo as his kind wife. Lastly, Werner Herzog's cameo as a German defector is astonishing and full of captivating dialogue and vocal performances. In conclusion, I loved Hayao Miyazaki's The Wind Rises. I think audiences will look back fondly on it one day like a friendly gust of wind blowing your hair.

  • Dec 04, 2020

    A true heartbreaking masterpiece. Hayao Miyazaki put his soul into this movie as he does all his movies and it shows. A love story that's rested on top of an anti-war message. Beautiful!

    A true heartbreaking masterpiece. Hayao Miyazaki put his soul into this movie as he does all his movies and it shows. A love story that's rested on top of an anti-war message. Beautiful!

  • Sep 20, 2020

    It might be the most beautifully animated of any Miyazaki film but I just couldn't get into the story of this the way that I did with some of his other work.

    It might be the most beautifully animated of any Miyazaki film but I just couldn't get into the story of this the way that I did with some of his other work.

  • Sep 08, 2020

    The wind rises is the weakest Miyazaki movie for me. Its main character is too dull and hollow so I can't relate to him at all. The story is basically aimless: anime characters are planning planes. Yes, that's it. It still worked pretty well for the first half of the movie, but after that I was just so bored. Also, the romance in this movie felt so naive and unnecessary. Hopefully Miyazaki leaves us with a better swan song...

    The wind rises is the weakest Miyazaki movie for me. Its main character is too dull and hollow so I can't relate to him at all. The story is basically aimless: anime characters are planning planes. Yes, that's it. It still worked pretty well for the first half of the movie, but after that I was just so bored. Also, the romance in this movie felt so naive and unnecessary. Hopefully Miyazaki leaves us with a better swan song...

  • Sep 01, 2020

    A different take on Japanese WW2 fighters and how they came about. It was a feel good movie to boot.

    A different take on Japanese WW2 fighters and how they came about. It was a feel good movie to boot.

  • Jul 27, 2020

    an amazing Japanese tale about ear crafting

    an amazing Japanese tale about ear crafting

  • Jul 25, 2020

    "REALMENTE HERMOSA" Aunque en mi opinión The Wind Rises no es la mejor pelicula de Miyazaki, es aun un gran trabajo de maestría de dirección e imaginativa del director que nos tiene acostumbrados y si esta hubiera sido en realidad su ultima pelicula, bueno, se hubiera ido por todo lo alto, volando en esos aviones que el tanto adora.

    "REALMENTE HERMOSA" Aunque en mi opinión The Wind Rises no es la mejor pelicula de Miyazaki, es aun un gran trabajo de maestría de dirección e imaginativa del director que nos tiene acostumbrados y si esta hubiera sido en realidad su ultima pelicula, bueno, se hubiera ido por todo lo alto, volando en esos aviones que el tanto adora.