The Wind Rises Reviews

  • 2d ago

    A story well told. Of dreams, love & airplanes..

    A story well told. Of dreams, love & airplanes..

  • Mar 03, 2020

    (8.0)I love Hayao Miyazaki!I love this movie!

    (8.0)I love Hayao Miyazaki!I love this movie!

  • Mar 01, 2020

    This movie should have won an oscar.

    This movie should have won an oscar.

  • Jan 18, 2020

    The Wind Rises is an interesting anime movie. It talks about the life of Jiro Horikoshi and his dreams of creating airplanes for the Japanese military. I love everything from this movie: the voice performances, the animation, the score, the story, etc. In my opinion, this movie should have won the Oscar instead of Frozen. At least director, Hayao Miyazaki, had make another amazing anime film. Overall, The Wind Rises had successfully passed the test.

    The Wind Rises is an interesting anime movie. It talks about the life of Jiro Horikoshi and his dreams of creating airplanes for the Japanese military. I love everything from this movie: the voice performances, the animation, the score, the story, etc. In my opinion, this movie should have won the Oscar instead of Frozen. At least director, Hayao Miyazaki, had make another amazing anime film. Overall, The Wind Rises had successfully passed the test.

  • Dec 25, 2019

    Watching this with two friends talking about it was difficult, but it's beautiful. I have to go back and rewatch it. "All I wanted to do was make something beautiful." Art often generates controversy and pushback, but I do feel like saying I disagree with the controversy here. The inherent clash between wanting to make something beautiful and making what turned out to be a kamikaze war weapon is excellent material for a story. This struck me in particular while watching: it's a true story, and Miyazaki and co give it a more "cinematic" look, for lack of a better word. For the first time I found myself reflecting on the fact Miyazaki is an adult who must watch, and be impressed by, lots of relatively conventional movies. (For example, I'd imagine he saw Reds, the 1981 historical movie about the Bolshevik revolution.) Usually the films Studio Ghibli makes are so fantastical that I never stop to think a normal person made this, someone who goes down to the cinema sometimes and buys a ticket.

    Watching this with two friends talking about it was difficult, but it's beautiful. I have to go back and rewatch it. "All I wanted to do was make something beautiful." Art often generates controversy and pushback, but I do feel like saying I disagree with the controversy here. The inherent clash between wanting to make something beautiful and making what turned out to be a kamikaze war weapon is excellent material for a story. This struck me in particular while watching: it's a true story, and Miyazaki and co give it a more "cinematic" look, for lack of a better word. For the first time I found myself reflecting on the fact Miyazaki is an adult who must watch, and be impressed by, lots of relatively conventional movies. (For example, I'd imagine he saw Reds, the 1981 historical movie about the Bolshevik revolution.) Usually the films Studio Ghibli makes are so fantastical that I never stop to think a normal person made this, someone who goes down to the cinema sometimes and buys a ticket.

  • Aug 10, 2019

    A visually immersive masterpiece. Miyazaki's farewell chapter The Wind Rises captures the magical power of dreams, as well as the inexplicable aura of true love; all through the lens of a boy, who lived a life. Iroh's grade: B

    A visually immersive masterpiece. Miyazaki's farewell chapter The Wind Rises captures the magical power of dreams, as well as the inexplicable aura of true love; all through the lens of a boy, who lived a life. Iroh's grade: B

  • Aug 10, 2019

    While being an animated film does suggest the imagination of the protagonist, it almost feels unnecessary and could've worked as a live action. Still, Miyazaki wanted to do it. And he did, with his signature charm.

    While being an animated film does suggest the imagination of the protagonist, it almost feels unnecessary and could've worked as a live action. Still, Miyazaki wanted to do it. And he did, with his signature charm.

  • Jul 28, 2019

    After being slightly disappointed by Howl's Moving Castle, I became a little worried lest Spirited Away is the last film in which Hayao Miyazaki managed to balance between telling a cohesive story and conveying passionate feelings. Without seeing 2008's Ponyo, I can gladly say that all my worries were for naught. Of course, It's essentially a biopic. And its moments of fantasy are only dreams and visions. But that doesn't mean that this made it an easier task for Miyazaki to prove that he hasn't lost his magic touch. That also in no way means that this film lacks the sense of wonder and the mesmerising animation Miyazaki's works are known for. IMHO, this is one of his most beautiful films, and one of the most beautiful animated films in general. Sure, this film could have simplified what concerns aeronautics to make this part more appealing to those who have no interest in such thing (like me). Also, it could have took more risks to differentiate itself from other biopics. But then again, I have these issues because I consider this a solid biopic, not an inspirational animated film. When it comes to the romance aspect of the film, it's safe to say that The Wind Rises has one of the most touching love stories I've witnessed in any animated feature. The conditions the lovers experience play a major part here; how their relationship has been established and develops throughout the film is what made this romance nearly on par with WALL·E's (only considering it's also an animated film). You may have noticed how much I identified with the characters. Actually, Jirô Horikoshi became one of my favourite Miyazaki characters alongside Chihiro and Totoro. All in all, The Wind Rises is a top-tierMiyazaki that was begging not to be his swan song. Miyazaki's latest work is also, surprisingly, his most mature to date. (8.5/10)

    After being slightly disappointed by Howl's Moving Castle, I became a little worried lest Spirited Away is the last film in which Hayao Miyazaki managed to balance between telling a cohesive story and conveying passionate feelings. Without seeing 2008's Ponyo, I can gladly say that all my worries were for naught. Of course, It's essentially a biopic. And its moments of fantasy are only dreams and visions. But that doesn't mean that this made it an easier task for Miyazaki to prove that he hasn't lost his magic touch. That also in no way means that this film lacks the sense of wonder and the mesmerising animation Miyazaki's works are known for. IMHO, this is one of his most beautiful films, and one of the most beautiful animated films in general. Sure, this film could have simplified what concerns aeronautics to make this part more appealing to those who have no interest in such thing (like me). Also, it could have took more risks to differentiate itself from other biopics. But then again, I have these issues because I consider this a solid biopic, not an inspirational animated film. When it comes to the romance aspect of the film, it's safe to say that The Wind Rises has one of the most touching love stories I've witnessed in any animated feature. The conditions the lovers experience play a major part here; how their relationship has been established and develops throughout the film is what made this romance nearly on par with WALL·E's (only considering it's also an animated film). You may have noticed how much I identified with the characters. Actually, Jirô Horikoshi became one of my favourite Miyazaki characters alongside Chihiro and Totoro. All in all, The Wind Rises is a top-tierMiyazaki that was begging not to be his swan song. Miyazaki's latest work is also, surprisingly, his most mature to date. (8.5/10)

  • Jun 18, 2019

    Beautiful yet cliched, the movie is heart-touching.

    Beautiful yet cliched, the movie is heart-touching.

  • May 04, 2019

    Miyazaki ends his career as a director beautifully with The Wind Rises

    Miyazaki ends his career as a director beautifully with The Wind Rises