Three Businessmen Reviews

  • Jan 31, 2015

    "Three Businessmen", tal como outros tantos filmes de Alex Cox, pode ser basicamente o que quisermos que seja: peça sobre o sentido da vida, um conto existencial de três reis ou uma gigante piada para a qual ninguém tem uma explicação fácil. O pior mesmo é reparar que este objecto indie as fuck - filmado com dinheiro holandês - encontra sérias dificuldades em manter-nos atentos durante uma hora e dezassete minutos, porque - verdade seja dita - o argumento não tem muita graça e ninguém quer saber das crises dos homens de negócios.

    "Three Businessmen", tal como outros tantos filmes de Alex Cox, pode ser basicamente o que quisermos que seja: peça sobre o sentido da vida, um conto existencial de três reis ou uma gigante piada para a qual ninguém tem uma explicação fácil. O pior mesmo é reparar que este objecto indie as fuck - filmado com dinheiro holandês - encontra sérias dificuldades em manter-nos atentos durante uma hora e dezassete minutos, porque - verdade seja dita - o argumento não tem muita graça e ninguém quer saber das crises dos homens de negócios.

  • Apr 29, 2014

    Directed by Alex Cox, who around this time had had trouble making The Winner (1996), which had been recut by the producers, and he missed out on making Richard III (1995) and Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (1998) due to creative differences. However, he'd been gathering funds to make this quirky comedy, written and produced by Cox's wife Tod Davies. It's very weird, but it's a rewarding experience. We begin in Liverpool, where American art dealer Bennie Reyes (Miguel Sandoval) arrives at a labyrinth of a hotel where he struggles to find his room. However, in the abandoned restaurant of the hotel, he meets fellow art collector Frank King (Cox), who suggests they go out on the town to look for better food. However, this is difficult because Frank is a vegetarian, so they look for food in Liverpool, but they soon find themselves in a districts of Liverpool which looks just like Rotterdam, Tokyo, Hong Kong and rural Spain, in search of something to eat, they cross paths on their odyssey with another arts dealer Leroy Jasper (Robert Wisdom) as well. There's something a little bit pretentious about this film, but part of it see's Cox back in his native Merseyside, which he would revisit for his historical/futuristic acid trip Revengers Tragedy (2002). But there's something oddly amusing about the whole film, it's not perfect, but you can make out what Cox's intentions are throughout the film.

    Directed by Alex Cox, who around this time had had trouble making The Winner (1996), which had been recut by the producers, and he missed out on making Richard III (1995) and Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (1998) due to creative differences. However, he'd been gathering funds to make this quirky comedy, written and produced by Cox's wife Tod Davies. It's very weird, but it's a rewarding experience. We begin in Liverpool, where American art dealer Bennie Reyes (Miguel Sandoval) arrives at a labyrinth of a hotel where he struggles to find his room. However, in the abandoned restaurant of the hotel, he meets fellow art collector Frank King (Cox), who suggests they go out on the town to look for better food. However, this is difficult because Frank is a vegetarian, so they look for food in Liverpool, but they soon find themselves in a districts of Liverpool which looks just like Rotterdam, Tokyo, Hong Kong and rural Spain, in search of something to eat, they cross paths on their odyssey with another arts dealer Leroy Jasper (Robert Wisdom) as well. There's something a little bit pretentious about this film, but part of it see's Cox back in his native Merseyside, which he would revisit for his historical/futuristic acid trip Revengers Tragedy (2002). But there's something oddly amusing about the whole film, it's not perfect, but you can make out what Cox's intentions are throughout the film.

  • Mar 14, 2011

    Ha! Loved this! Lost In Translation meets Waiting For Godot.

    Ha! Loved this! Lost In Translation meets Waiting For Godot.

  • Feb 09, 2011

    A surreal search for food that has a plot that sounds as dumb as 'Dude, Where's my Car?', but is actually extremely mature film-making with an unexpected metaphor ending.

    A surreal search for food that has a plot that sounds as dumb as 'Dude, Where's my Car?', but is actually extremely mature film-making with an unexpected metaphor ending.

  • Feb 02, 2011

    Quirky, another Coxy curiosity.

    Quirky, another Coxy curiosity.

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    Eric B Super Reviewer
    Oct 16, 2009

    It's interesting that "Three Businessmen" is credited as "An Exterminating Angel Production," because the film's debt to Luis Bunuel is obvious -- particularly in light of "The Exterminating Angel" and "The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie," Bunuel's two masterpieces about mysteriously interrupted activity. "Lost in Translation" fans also will see some familiar turf here. Directed but not written by Alex Cox ("Repo Man," "Sid and Nancy"), "Three Businessmen" was shot in five different locations including Liverpool, Rotterdam, Hong Kong and Tokyo. But you may not notice the transitions (after all, so many cities have Asian districts). A motley cast drifts in and out of the frame, but most of the film's scant 80 minutes rest upon just two actors: Cox himself and Miguel Sandoval (who has appeared in most of Cox's projects). They play art dealers who happen to meet in a posh Liverpool hotel. Bennie (Sandoval) is a restless, overly friendly sort who strains to charm people with smarmy nicknames and comic accents. His part is somewhat overwritten, and this is the film's worst flaw. Meanwhile, Frank (Cox, quite solid as a performer) is the straight man who's a bit impatient and irritable. He likes to carefully tear articles out of newspapers. We don't know why. The two are frustrated with their hotel's lack of restaurant service, so they trek into the surrounding streets to find a meal. Their attempts to eat ("discreet" attempts, perhaps?) are repeatedly thwarted and they soon lose their bearings. They have many conversations along the way, though -- some intriguing, some dull. And wherever they go, they see posters advertising someone named Daddy Z. We don't know why. Stick around, even if the lack of plot irritates you -- there's a clever, absurdist ending that perfectly wraps up the story. And rest assured, the film's title eventually will make sense.

    It's interesting that "Three Businessmen" is credited as "An Exterminating Angel Production," because the film's debt to Luis Bunuel is obvious -- particularly in light of "The Exterminating Angel" and "The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie," Bunuel's two masterpieces about mysteriously interrupted activity. "Lost in Translation" fans also will see some familiar turf here. Directed but not written by Alex Cox ("Repo Man," "Sid and Nancy"), "Three Businessmen" was shot in five different locations including Liverpool, Rotterdam, Hong Kong and Tokyo. But you may not notice the transitions (after all, so many cities have Asian districts). A motley cast drifts in and out of the frame, but most of the film's scant 80 minutes rest upon just two actors: Cox himself and Miguel Sandoval (who has appeared in most of Cox's projects). They play art dealers who happen to meet in a posh Liverpool hotel. Bennie (Sandoval) is a restless, overly friendly sort who strains to charm people with smarmy nicknames and comic accents. His part is somewhat overwritten, and this is the film's worst flaw. Meanwhile, Frank (Cox, quite solid as a performer) is the straight man who's a bit impatient and irritable. He likes to carefully tear articles out of newspapers. We don't know why. The two are frustrated with their hotel's lack of restaurant service, so they trek into the surrounding streets to find a meal. Their attempts to eat ("discreet" attempts, perhaps?) are repeatedly thwarted and they soon lose their bearings. They have many conversations along the way, though -- some intriguing, some dull. And wherever they go, they see posters advertising someone named Daddy Z. We don't know why. Stick around, even if the lack of plot irritates you -- there's a clever, absurdist ending that perfectly wraps up the story. And rest assured, the film's title eventually will make sense.

  • Sep 15, 2009

    I didn't care much for this at first, but it's stuck out in my mind over the last few weeks. Miguel Sandoval and Alex Cox meet in a London hotel, and discover that as chance would have it they are both art dealers. They decide to go out to get a drink, but in "Discreet Charm Of The Bourgeoisie" style they can never seem to sit down because of a series of absurdities that plague them every time they get close to eating. "I'm terrified of abundance!" Along the way they have "My Dinner With Andre" type conversations about life, death, the universe and everything. "If you want to get computers to work better, to have human like artificial intelligence, you have to teach them to suffer. As soon as they learn to suffer, they will feel guilty and want to work harder." The further they walk the less recognizable the neighborhood seems, and it becomes clear to the viewer though the characters continuously deny it, that they have impossibly wandered into different countries. By the end of the night they have traveled around the world, but instead of seeing China, they concede "Okay well we must be in China Town now". I sense a subtle critique of globalization, the way a single city could possibly represent every place on earth, an idea explored more thouroughly in the melancholic and more than ocassionally dull "Shijie(The World)". Its pleasant and amusing throughout, and the variety of cities at night recall a modern update of "Night On Earth". My favorite scene is of Sandoval, whose character is at turns, annoying, charming, and inexplicable, has a montage of reading books on his bed, titles like "The Multi-Orgasmic Man", which become increasingly complicated as the montage goes on. A minor example of man's search for meaning if ever there was one. There is also a twist at the end, that I wont give away, which may seem tacked on to some, but so much of the movie is stitched together, it doesn't seem too far out of place. After "Death And The Compass" I assumed Alex Cox just got lucky with his stroke of brilliance in "Repo Man", but "Three Businessman" proves he can still pull out a fresh trick or two. A unique and odd comedy, that allows a fine actor Miguel Sandoval to showcase his skills. Here is a man who is terribly typecast and minimized in his other roles. Also his business is actually based out of San Pedro, my home town, (which wins browny points from me). Especially since a film about the entire planet and coincidences, managed to zero in on my particular small corner of it, if only for a second. This is the best moving about traveling businessmen, uprooted from their homes and slowly but surely reality itself(or perhaps into the hands of a fate greater than themselves), since "The Big Kahunna". Sadly Robert Wisdom (who was awesome in "Storytelling") doesn't turn up until the end of the film. I guess you can't always get what you want, but sometimes a brisk walk and some fine coversation is just enough.

    I didn't care much for this at first, but it's stuck out in my mind over the last few weeks. Miguel Sandoval and Alex Cox meet in a London hotel, and discover that as chance would have it they are both art dealers. They decide to go out to get a drink, but in "Discreet Charm Of The Bourgeoisie" style they can never seem to sit down because of a series of absurdities that plague them every time they get close to eating. "I'm terrified of abundance!" Along the way they have "My Dinner With Andre" type conversations about life, death, the universe and everything. "If you want to get computers to work better, to have human like artificial intelligence, you have to teach them to suffer. As soon as they learn to suffer, they will feel guilty and want to work harder." The further they walk the less recognizable the neighborhood seems, and it becomes clear to the viewer though the characters continuously deny it, that they have impossibly wandered into different countries. By the end of the night they have traveled around the world, but instead of seeing China, they concede "Okay well we must be in China Town now". I sense a subtle critique of globalization, the way a single city could possibly represent every place on earth, an idea explored more thouroughly in the melancholic and more than ocassionally dull "Shijie(The World)". Its pleasant and amusing throughout, and the variety of cities at night recall a modern update of "Night On Earth". My favorite scene is of Sandoval, whose character is at turns, annoying, charming, and inexplicable, has a montage of reading books on his bed, titles like "The Multi-Orgasmic Man", which become increasingly complicated as the montage goes on. A minor example of man's search for meaning if ever there was one. There is also a twist at the end, that I wont give away, which may seem tacked on to some, but so much of the movie is stitched together, it doesn't seem too far out of place. After "Death And The Compass" I assumed Alex Cox just got lucky with his stroke of brilliance in "Repo Man", but "Three Businessman" proves he can still pull out a fresh trick or two. A unique and odd comedy, that allows a fine actor Miguel Sandoval to showcase his skills. Here is a man who is terribly typecast and minimized in his other roles. Also his business is actually based out of San Pedro, my home town, (which wins browny points from me). Especially since a film about the entire planet and coincidences, managed to zero in on my particular small corner of it, if only for a second. This is the best moving about traveling businessmen, uprooted from their homes and slowly but surely reality itself(or perhaps into the hands of a fate greater than themselves), since "The Big Kahunna". Sadly Robert Wisdom (who was awesome in "Storytelling") doesn't turn up until the end of the film. I guess you can't always get what you want, but sometimes a brisk walk and some fine coversation is just enough.

  • Jul 03, 2009

    What a film! It's so ridiculously off-beat that you can't look away. I don't even really know what it meant or even what I watched, but I loved it.

    What a film! It's so ridiculously off-beat that you can't look away. I don't even really know what it meant or even what I watched, but I loved it.

  • Jun 16, 2009

    def. pays off in the end ;) man, Alex Cox sure had a string of hidden gems in the 80's!

    def. pays off in the end ;) man, Alex Cox sure had a string of hidden gems in the 80's!

  • Feb 27, 2009

    Miguel Sandoval has turned up in lots of movies but rarely gets a chance to shine. Luckily, he's very shiny in this oddness about two (!) men seeking food and alternating between trivial chat and babyish whining.

    Miguel Sandoval has turned up in lots of movies but rarely gets a chance to shine. Luckily, he's very shiny in this oddness about two (!) men seeking food and alternating between trivial chat and babyish whining.