Today We Live Reviews

  • Nov 12, 2018

    The film starts off in England in 1916. An American right off the bat purchases the home of a soldier who lost his life at battle. It is it interesting film in that the first half of the film takes place on the home front and is based upon the woman's perspective of the film. The film usually shows the reactions of what had happened on War front and is after the reactions people at home have to the news coming from Battle. It is unusual in that that could not be done today. This film was insightful to me because it had me think about things like sugar being rationed. I was surprised by people wanting roaches to use to do roach fights and people actively going after catching roaches for fights or having a funeral for the roach. I have never seen that in a WWI film before. I have never heard of speed boats releasing the torpedo and the boat moving out of the way of the torpedo was news to me. I like how the film and lighting were done in this film. Joan Crawford I think does a great job in this film in that the film has her most powerful stuff not from her dialog but relies heavily on her reactions to what others say or actions. The outfits stood out to me as well but I hated the first outfit that Joan Crawford is wearing because it looks like she has a shark tail fine sticking out off of her dress in a terrible looking way. I like how the bicycle shot is filmed in the beginning of this film. You can tell that Gary Cooper and Joan Crawford are driving their bikes very slow but visually it looks very appealing. I thought it was very interesting that in the second half of the film we finally get the chance to see what is happening from the men's perspective and see what is happening both on air and at sea. The sea was the most insightful aspect because I was completely unaware of that aspect of the war of small speedboats being used to sink German boats the way this film was showing. I also was not aware of some of the struggles a WWI bomber would have like difficulties hearing due to wind and airplane sounds. I liked how some of the models look in this film as far as the explosions in this film. This film can be very boating but the film relies mostly on dialog and reactions rather than on action so unless you know the time period you may loose context of what is happening in the film. The film has a dumb ending. I did not feel satisfied by the ending.

    The film starts off in England in 1916. An American right off the bat purchases the home of a soldier who lost his life at battle. It is it interesting film in that the first half of the film takes place on the home front and is based upon the woman's perspective of the film. The film usually shows the reactions of what had happened on War front and is after the reactions people at home have to the news coming from Battle. It is unusual in that that could not be done today. This film was insightful to me because it had me think about things like sugar being rationed. I was surprised by people wanting roaches to use to do roach fights and people actively going after catching roaches for fights or having a funeral for the roach. I have never seen that in a WWI film before. I have never heard of speed boats releasing the torpedo and the boat moving out of the way of the torpedo was news to me. I like how the film and lighting were done in this film. Joan Crawford I think does a great job in this film in that the film has her most powerful stuff not from her dialog but relies heavily on her reactions to what others say or actions. The outfits stood out to me as well but I hated the first outfit that Joan Crawford is wearing because it looks like she has a shark tail fine sticking out off of her dress in a terrible looking way. I like how the bicycle shot is filmed in the beginning of this film. You can tell that Gary Cooper and Joan Crawford are driving their bikes very slow but visually it looks very appealing. I thought it was very interesting that in the second half of the film we finally get the chance to see what is happening from the men's perspective and see what is happening both on air and at sea. The sea was the most insightful aspect because I was completely unaware of that aspect of the war of small speedboats being used to sink German boats the way this film was showing. I also was not aware of some of the struggles a WWI bomber would have like difficulties hearing due to wind and airplane sounds. I liked how some of the models look in this film as far as the explosions in this film. This film can be very boating but the film relies mostly on dialog and reactions rather than on action so unless you know the time period you may loose context of what is happening in the film. The film has a dumb ending. I did not feel satisfied by the ending.

  • May 10, 2014

    Today We Live is an excellent film. It is about two officers, one a pilot and the other in the navy, compete for the same beautiful young woman. Joan Crawford and Gary Cooper give amazing performances. The screenplay is well written. Howard Hawks and Richard Rosson did great jobs directing this movie. I enjoyed watching this motion picture because of the drama and romance. Today We Live is a must see.

    Today We Live is an excellent film. It is about two officers, one a pilot and the other in the navy, compete for the same beautiful young woman. Joan Crawford and Gary Cooper give amazing performances. The screenplay is well written. Howard Hawks and Richard Rosson did great jobs directing this movie. I enjoyed watching this motion picture because of the drama and romance. Today We Live is a must see.

  • Jan 18, 2014

    Directed by Howard Hawks (and uncredited work by Richard Rosson) with story and dialogue by William Faulkner, you'd think this tale of heroism and romance set in WWI England would have been a whole lot better, but it's all very stiff and uninvolving. Joan Crawford fits right in with the stilted dialogue and stiff performance, since she never seemed a very naturalistic performer to me anyhow, but the very folksy and natural Gary Cooper seems really out of place delivering Faulkner's ponderous dialogue. Robert Young is really the only performer who brings any warmth and realism to his character, but overall the film is pretty dull. Faulkner had very few great films during his Hollywood tenure, so that's not surprising here, but director Hawks is usually pretty reliable for delivering entertaining films. Just not in this case.

    Directed by Howard Hawks (and uncredited work by Richard Rosson) with story and dialogue by William Faulkner, you'd think this tale of heroism and romance set in WWI England would have been a whole lot better, but it's all very stiff and uninvolving. Joan Crawford fits right in with the stilted dialogue and stiff performance, since she never seemed a very naturalistic performer to me anyhow, but the very folksy and natural Gary Cooper seems really out of place delivering Faulkner's ponderous dialogue. Robert Young is really the only performer who brings any warmth and realism to his character, but overall the film is pretty dull. Faulkner had very few great films during his Hollywood tenure, so that's not surprising here, but director Hawks is usually pretty reliable for delivering entertaining films. Just not in this case.

  • jay n Super Reviewer
    Sep 22, 2013

    Ponderous, miscast slog of a film. The performers try their best but only Cooper's character is believable. Crawford, Young and Tone are all supposed to be British born, none speak in anything but refined American accents. Their parts should have been played by Diana Wynyard, Ronald Coleman and Leslie Howard. The film would probably still have been a bore but at least it would have felt grounded in some kind of reality.

    Ponderous, miscast slog of a film. The performers try their best but only Cooper's character is believable. Crawford, Young and Tone are all supposed to be British born, none speak in anything but refined American accents. Their parts should have been played by Diana Wynyard, Ronald Coleman and Leslie Howard. The film would probably still have been a bore but at least it would have felt grounded in some kind of reality.

  • Sep 17, 2013

    joan ends up with 2 hubbie-some grrls have all the luck

    joan ends up with 2 hubbie-some grrls have all the luck

  • Jan 15, 2012

    Some of Joan's older movies don't hold up as well and this is one of them, tho her acting, as always, was excellent. It's a shame her *&^% daughter Christina has made Joan known more for her alleged abuses than her fine acting. Even in this mediocre movie, Joan churns out the tears (real tears, not the water induced ones of today) effortlessly.

    Some of Joan's older movies don't hold up as well and this is one of them, tho her acting, as always, was excellent. It's a shame her *&^% daughter Christina has made Joan known more for her alleged abuses than her fine acting. Even in this mediocre movie, Joan churns out the tears (real tears, not the water induced ones of today) effortlessly.

  • Jun 29, 2010

    Joan is beautiful, if anachronistically dressed, in this WWI picture. Franchot Tone is Joan's brother, Robert Young their neighbor/her lover, Gary Cooper the American who is renting Joan and Franchot's home. Oh yeah, Joan, Franchot, and Robert are supposedly British, but only because the movie tells us so, not from their sounding like it. All the players are attractive, the movie starts well, but winds up dull.

    Joan is beautiful, if anachronistically dressed, in this WWI picture. Franchot Tone is Joan's brother, Robert Young their neighbor/her lover, Gary Cooper the American who is renting Joan and Franchot's home. Oh yeah, Joan, Franchot, and Robert are supposedly British, but only because the movie tells us so, not from their sounding like it. All the players are attractive, the movie starts well, but winds up dull.

  • Jun 14, 2009

    good the formula is way too familiar love triangle=plot of the movie.

    good the formula is way too familiar love triangle=plot of the movie.

  • nefnie l Super Reviewer
    Jun 03, 2009

    Despite being made by the infamous Hawks, written by Faulkner, and starring some great legends in the likes of Crawford, Cooper, Young, etc., this movie is as frustrating to watch as putting together a puzzle that you know is missing pieces. The fault mainly lies in the editing, as the running time was cut from 135 min. We are left watching scenes take place that we don't understand why it's happening. The dialogue, as the film, is somewhat staccato in its delivery. This film would have succeeded more as a war film and left off the added romantic triangle.

    Despite being made by the infamous Hawks, written by Faulkner, and starring some great legends in the likes of Crawford, Cooper, Young, etc., this movie is as frustrating to watch as putting together a puzzle that you know is missing pieces. The fault mainly lies in the editing, as the running time was cut from 135 min. We are left watching scenes take place that we don't understand why it's happening. The dialogue, as the film, is somewhat staccato in its delivery. This film would have succeeded more as a war film and left off the added romantic triangle.

  • Sep 14, 2005

    [img]http://classicmoviefavorites.com/crawford/todaywelive2.jpg[/img] For some reason, I seem to be more fascinated by World War I than by World War II, at least when it comes to films. I know that's completely different from most people, but while I enjoy the occasional WWII film, I've never found one that moved me on the level of films like [i]A Farewell to Arms[/i] and [i]All Quiet On the Westernfront[/i]. Maybe it's because most of these movies were made before the second World War. As horrific as that was was, there was something even more strangely tragic about the very first one. It was on a scale that had never been seen, and I always find those films more personal and relateable than World War II movies. [i]Today We Live[/i] is on that list of great WWI movies. Joan Crawford and Franchot Tone are brother and sister (a little strange watching them as siblings, knowing that they were pretty hot and heavy off screen, and would be married two years later), and best friends with Robert Young. Young and Tone are away at war, and with her father now dead, she must rent the family home to a friendly american, Gary Cooper. She agrees to marry Young, but falls in love with Cooper. She runs away to France to be with Young and Tone, and recieves word that Cooper died in training for the air force. She feels free to marry Young now, and help him through his psychological issues, but soon after their marriage, Cooper returns. There are small problems with the film. The script is choppy in its dialogue. Clearly, Faulkner was trying to cover up that the people playing his very british characters were very, very American. But those small issues are completely overcome by the power of the story. It's all about selfless love, on all fronts, and making the ultimate sacrifice for the person you love. However, despite their love and emotions toward each other, none of the characters are perfect. Tone is a good man who is closed up and can't express himself. Young is a brave soldier and nice fellow, but a chronic alcoholic. Cooper is a strong, noble man with a jealous streak. Crawford's character seems the least flawes of the bunch, but even her martyrdom is portrayed as being slightly obsessive. The pairing of Tone and Crawford as brother and sister is very interesting, and lends a subtext to the film that might not have been there otherwise. There's a certain pent up passion between the two, and whether it was written that way or not is beside the point, because it comes across beautifully onscreen. You get the feeling Tone's character wants Crawford to marry Young because it's the closest he can come to having her himself. And, despite the very american-ness of the supposed-to-be englishness, the cast gives fine performances. It's one of Cooper's best, and one of his earliest ventures into ruggishness for sound films. And he has pretty good chemistry with Crawford, who, for once, gets to be something other than a shopgirl. She really does wonderful things with the role. You can see every horrible thing war can do to a person in her face. But the real stars of the show are Tone and Young. Their chemistry with Crawford is perfect, and with each other it's a revelation. There's a sweetness to their friendship which is sort of a light in the darkness of war. Their final noble act together is beautiful, touching, and moving. [b]Final Grade: [/b]A

    [img]http://classicmoviefavorites.com/crawford/todaywelive2.jpg[/img] For some reason, I seem to be more fascinated by World War I than by World War II, at least when it comes to films. I know that's completely different from most people, but while I enjoy the occasional WWII film, I've never found one that moved me on the level of films like [i]A Farewell to Arms[/i] and [i]All Quiet On the Westernfront[/i]. Maybe it's because most of these movies were made before the second World War. As horrific as that was was, there was something even more strangely tragic about the very first one. It was on a scale that had never been seen, and I always find those films more personal and relateable than World War II movies. [i]Today We Live[/i] is on that list of great WWI movies. Joan Crawford and Franchot Tone are brother and sister (a little strange watching them as siblings, knowing that they were pretty hot and heavy off screen, and would be married two years later), and best friends with Robert Young. Young and Tone are away at war, and with her father now dead, she must rent the family home to a friendly american, Gary Cooper. She agrees to marry Young, but falls in love with Cooper. She runs away to France to be with Young and Tone, and recieves word that Cooper died in training for the air force. She feels free to marry Young now, and help him through his psychological issues, but soon after their marriage, Cooper returns. There are small problems with the film. The script is choppy in its dialogue. Clearly, Faulkner was trying to cover up that the people playing his very british characters were very, very American. But those small issues are completely overcome by the power of the story. It's all about selfless love, on all fronts, and making the ultimate sacrifice for the person you love. However, despite their love and emotions toward each other, none of the characters are perfect. Tone is a good man who is closed up and can't express himself. Young is a brave soldier and nice fellow, but a chronic alcoholic. Cooper is a strong, noble man with a jealous streak. Crawford's character seems the least flawes of the bunch, but even her martyrdom is portrayed as being slightly obsessive. The pairing of Tone and Crawford as brother and sister is very interesting, and lends a subtext to the film that might not have been there otherwise. There's a certain pent up passion between the two, and whether it was written that way or not is beside the point, because it comes across beautifully onscreen. You get the feeling Tone's character wants Crawford to marry Young because it's the closest he can come to having her himself. And, despite the very american-ness of the supposed-to-be englishness, the cast gives fine performances. It's one of Cooper's best, and one of his earliest ventures into ruggishness for sound films. And he has pretty good chemistry with Crawford, who, for once, gets to be something other than a shopgirl. She really does wonderful things with the role. You can see every horrible thing war can do to a person in her face. But the real stars of the show are Tone and Young. Their chemistry with Crawford is perfect, and with each other it's a revelation. There's a sweetness to their friendship which is sort of a light in the darkness of war. Their final noble act together is beautiful, touching, and moving. [b]Final Grade: [/b]A