Under the Skin Reviews

September 7, 2011
April 25, 2003
February 14, 2001
In her feature debut, Adler shapes her film gracefully and elicits a scorching no-holds-barred, totally selfless portrayal from Morton.
January 1, 2000
After a promising beginning ... the crux of the story ... is taken for granted and any established empathy for Iris' sad plight dwindles fast.
January 1, 2000
Adler does a remarkable job of conveying the kind of anguished soul sickness that is at a loss for words or conventional expression.
January 1, 2000
Morton makes Iris real. Every moment she's on screen, the actress forces us to accept Iris as a living, breathing individual.
January 1, 2000
It is buoyed by an unflinching performance from newcomer Samantha Morton, a young British actress who is willing to expose not only her body but her inner being as well.
January 1, 2000
Morton's Iris keeps going in circles... It's a spooky, movie-dominating performance.
January 1, 2000
Although Iris has no idea who she is, Morton is utterly certain, and inhabits her temporarily defeated soul with an ease that knocks you out.
January 1, 2000
While Ms. Morton embodies the role with furious intensity and with a raw yet waifish presence that brings both Emily Watson and Claire Danes to mind, Ms. Adler directs the film in ways that live up to its title.
January 1, 2000
Made with a novelist's eye for detail and a quietly impassioned visual flair.