Under the Volcano Reviews

  • Jul 29, 2019

    I read the book first and than watched the movie and it was exactly like i imagend when i read the book . A movie that accomplishes that is worth 5 stars . Great performance from Finney and Huston

    I read the book first and than watched the movie and it was exactly like i imagend when i read the book . A movie that accomplishes that is worth 5 stars . Great performance from Finney and Huston

  • Dec 02, 2016

    The best movie about alcoholism ever made, Under the Volcano beholds one of cinema's greatest performances.

    The best movie about alcoholism ever made, Under the Volcano beholds one of cinema's greatest performances.

  • Apr 09, 2016

    I may only drink beer today. George Firmin is oblivious to everything going on around him as he lives his life in a state of hangover and getting drunk again. His friends try to get him to slow down; meanwhile, a revolution is about to break out around him and people are going to start dying. Hopefully the local events can sober George up. "You should write something about the day of the dead." "It's been done." John Huston, director of The Maltese Falcon, The Treasure of Sierra Madre, The Man Who Would Become King, Moulin Rouge (1952), and Key Largo, delivers Under the Volcano. The storyline for this wasn't as tight as I would have liked it and I didn't find the characters that compelling. The script was solid. The cast includes Albert Finney, Anthony Andrews, Jacqueline Bisset, and Katy Jurado. "Ride 'em, cowboy!" I DVR'd this picture because it was directed by the legend John Huston. This was disappointing and one of my least favorite pictures from Huston. Overall, I wouldn't go out of my way to see this. "I couldn't get the ring off..." Grade: C-

    I may only drink beer today. George Firmin is oblivious to everything going on around him as he lives his life in a state of hangover and getting drunk again. His friends try to get him to slow down; meanwhile, a revolution is about to break out around him and people are going to start dying. Hopefully the local events can sober George up. "You should write something about the day of the dead." "It's been done." John Huston, director of The Maltese Falcon, The Treasure of Sierra Madre, The Man Who Would Become King, Moulin Rouge (1952), and Key Largo, delivers Under the Volcano. The storyline for this wasn't as tight as I would have liked it and I didn't find the characters that compelling. The script was solid. The cast includes Albert Finney, Anthony Andrews, Jacqueline Bisset, and Katy Jurado. "Ride 'em, cowboy!" I DVR'd this picture because it was directed by the legend John Huston. This was disappointing and one of my least favorite pictures from Huston. Overall, I wouldn't go out of my way to see this. "I couldn't get the ring off..." Grade: C-

  • Feb 24, 2016

    Sad and tragic. It's thought provoking, but not something you watch. For entertainment.

    Sad and tragic. It's thought provoking, but not something you watch. For entertainment.

  • Jan 12, 2016

    Screechy inebriation.

    Screechy inebriation.

  • Oct 18, 2015

    It's an odd movie but Finney and Bisset are really great to watch

    It's an odd movie but Finney and Bisset are really great to watch

  • Apr 22, 2015

    gr8 cast makes this one go

    gr8 cast makes this one go

  • Jun 02, 2014

    Decidedly a mish-mash from Huston, who seems so utterly seduced by Finney's performance (a rare piece of perfection) that the rest of the film surrounding it has as sure a footing as the consul at its center. Bisset is trying but given very little to do besides look concerned and get dragged around by the script. The rising tension and pain of the climax are nearly destroyed by the very last moments of overplaying one's hand, and crushing literal evocation of the title, an unnecessary move.

    Decidedly a mish-mash from Huston, who seems so utterly seduced by Finney's performance (a rare piece of perfection) that the rest of the film surrounding it has as sure a footing as the consul at its center. Bisset is trying but given very little to do besides look concerned and get dragged around by the script. The rising tension and pain of the climax are nearly destroyed by the very last moments of overplaying one's hand, and crushing literal evocation of the title, an unnecessary move.

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    John B Super Reviewer
    May 16, 2014

    A bitter portrayal by Albert Finney of a man on the road to destruction. It is off the wall and bends reality sufficiently to off put many a viewer.

    A bitter portrayal by Albert Finney of a man on the road to destruction. It is off the wall and bends reality sufficiently to off put many a viewer.

  • Dec 22, 2013

    Don't be fooled by the dark glasses in the cover of its DVD box or its poster, this John Huston film is not about a hipster's feel-good adventure and Finney is no Hercule Poirot here (although he does reunite with his co-star Bisset from MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS 1974, 9/10), the truth is, it is adapted from Malcolm Lowry's classic but "unadaptable" novel with the same title. Set in 1939, Mexico, starts on the eve of the Day of the Dead, it focuses on a former British consul's life in one-day span, plagued by incorrigible alcoholism and blindsided by his ex-wife's return with an attempt to rekindle their new life together, he begins to realize he is a lost cause which is beyond any succor, and the finale is both stalely traumatizing and embarrassingly contrived. But one sure thing is that Finney devotes fully to the role and evokes wondrous affections from the very beginning, he is a genuine force of self-destruction, a damaged soul would be a nuisance to others, but underneath his portly and alcohol-soaked figure, he represents one state-of-mind can virtually remind us how fragile and pathologically determined one can be, even it heads to a suicidal ruin. His two co-stars, Bisset and Andrews, come on board also pretty strikingly with their different nature of temperaments, Bisset is the glamorous ex-wife who balks at her further step as we do watch her hemming in the quandary, Andrews is a pleasant matador, his side of the story should have been more explored, clearly he knows what had happened between the couple, but nobody cares to shed a light here, as the horrible coda lurks, the movie only manages to exert all its energy to an irksome case of xenophobia without giving any justice to its cause and effect. So undeniably Houston's later career wanes harshly in quality, still, a notable mention should be addressed to the legendary composer Alex North (grabs his last Oscar nomination out of a total 15 nominations without a win except an Honorary award in 1986), whose eerie opening score of the variegated skull show does set a high bar to what this anti-climax film would actually offer, sad to say but this is another John Huston work I dare not to advocate (after THE MAN WHO COULD BE KING 1975, 5/10 and PRIZZI'S HONOR 1985, 5/10).

    Don't be fooled by the dark glasses in the cover of its DVD box or its poster, this John Huston film is not about a hipster's feel-good adventure and Finney is no Hercule Poirot here (although he does reunite with his co-star Bisset from MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS 1974, 9/10), the truth is, it is adapted from Malcolm Lowry's classic but "unadaptable" novel with the same title. Set in 1939, Mexico, starts on the eve of the Day of the Dead, it focuses on a former British consul's life in one-day span, plagued by incorrigible alcoholism and blindsided by his ex-wife's return with an attempt to rekindle their new life together, he begins to realize he is a lost cause which is beyond any succor, and the finale is both stalely traumatizing and embarrassingly contrived. But one sure thing is that Finney devotes fully to the role and evokes wondrous affections from the very beginning, he is a genuine force of self-destruction, a damaged soul would be a nuisance to others, but underneath his portly and alcohol-soaked figure, he represents one state-of-mind can virtually remind us how fragile and pathologically determined one can be, even it heads to a suicidal ruin. His two co-stars, Bisset and Andrews, come on board also pretty strikingly with their different nature of temperaments, Bisset is the glamorous ex-wife who balks at her further step as we do watch her hemming in the quandary, Andrews is a pleasant matador, his side of the story should have been more explored, clearly he knows what had happened between the couple, but nobody cares to shed a light here, as the horrible coda lurks, the movie only manages to exert all its energy to an irksome case of xenophobia without giving any justice to its cause and effect. So undeniably Houston's later career wanes harshly in quality, still, a notable mention should be addressed to the legendary composer Alex North (grabs his last Oscar nomination out of a total 15 nominations without a win except an Honorary award in 1986), whose eerie opening score of the variegated skull show does set a high bar to what this anti-climax film would actually offer, sad to say but this is another John Huston work I dare not to advocate (after THE MAN WHO COULD BE KING 1975, 5/10 and PRIZZI'S HONOR 1985, 5/10).