Unzipped Reviews

  • Nov 14, 2015

    bring on the cat fights in this inside look fashion doc

    bring on the cat fights in this inside look fashion doc

  • Aug 13, 2014

    This documentary has only gotten better with age. If you've an interest in the fashion industry this is essential viewing. It is a pitch-perfect time capsule moment for early 1990's fashion.

    This documentary has only gotten better with age. If you've an interest in the fashion industry this is essential viewing. It is a pitch-perfect time capsule moment for early 1990's fashion.

  • May 10, 2013

    Isaac is a genius! I have always loved him and his collections! This was a great look into his world!

    Isaac is a genius! I have always loved him and his collections! This was a great look into his world!

  • Jan 28, 2013

    Pretty good doc. Definitely could've been shot and edited better. Isaac is a fascinating and charismatic subject, so the movie mostly gets by on that. Worth watching.

    Pretty good doc. Definitely could've been shot and edited better. Isaac is a fascinating and charismatic subject, so the movie mostly gets by on that. Worth watching.

  • Avatar
    John B Super Reviewer
    Dec 14, 2012

    I loved it because it just goes to show what a weirdo Isaac Mizrahi is and what a strange world fashion design is. Talk about falling out of any sense of reality.

    I loved it because it just goes to show what a weirdo Isaac Mizrahi is and what a strange world fashion design is. Talk about falling out of any sense of reality.

  • Sep 14, 2012

    I could watch this documentary every day.

    I could watch this documentary every day.

  • Apr 05, 2010

    Last time I went to rate this it wasn't on here. Love Isaac.

    Last time I went to rate this it wasn't on here. Love Isaac.

  • Nov 24, 2009

    (from The Watermark 09/02/95) FASHION PASSION: In many ways, Unzipped is the film that Ready to Wear (Pret-a-Porter) wanted to be but never was. The documentary about the work of fashion designer Isaac Mizrahi is an enlightening look at the hard work that goes into the frequently rose-tinted fashion industry. It pays nice homage to Mizrahi and his work, and is good entertainment in both its rich content and well-executed production values. Unzipped succeeds partly because it happens to have a dramatic thrust to it that is worthy of any scripted film. The film starts on a low note with Mizrahi’s Spring 1994 collection having unimpressed the world’s fashion critics. Not knowing where his future lies, he starts working on his Fall 1994 clothing line. We witness him coming up with new ideas, researching clothing overseas, auditioning models, gabbing about what inspired him as a child and eventually coordinating the actual presentation of the new line of clothes. Near-disaster strikes when a magazine cover story reveals that another major designer has come up with the same ideas as Mizrahi - and has already executed them. Mizrahi still sallies forth and takes the risk of continuing with his plan, not knowing how the new collection will be received by the fashion world. Mizrahi is a charming specimen: very New York, very Jewish, and very artistic. Not only does he design clothes, but he plays the piano, sings a little, and has a great passion for the campy and the kitschy - which frequently comes to the surface in his clothing lines. Watching the different things that influence him - his mother, The Banana Splits, Nanook of the North, and Call of the Wild - is fascinating. Director Douglas Keeve masterfully uses artistic techniques which enhance the subject matter without overpowering. His most interesting choice was to do the majority of the film in black and white. One would expect color to be of great importance in a work centered on the fashion industry. But by using a variety of grains and tints, he makes us more aware of texture and tone. In addition, the black and white makes the color segments much more striking: especially with Mizrahi’s passion for vibrant Technicolor hues in his clothes. Queer Quotient: A film about the fashion industry and one of the gayest designers out there? Please! A fashion queen will be in hog heaven. The film focuses on his work and doesn’t get into his personal life, and it isn’t outwardly stated that he is gay. But does anybody really wonder? With his chunky frame, crinkly hair, heavy Bronx accent, dark complexion, and frog-croak voice, he could be Harvey Fierstein’s long lost kid brother.

    (from The Watermark 09/02/95) FASHION PASSION: In many ways, Unzipped is the film that Ready to Wear (Pret-a-Porter) wanted to be but never was. The documentary about the work of fashion designer Isaac Mizrahi is an enlightening look at the hard work that goes into the frequently rose-tinted fashion industry. It pays nice homage to Mizrahi and his work, and is good entertainment in both its rich content and well-executed production values. Unzipped succeeds partly because it happens to have a dramatic thrust to it that is worthy of any scripted film. The film starts on a low note with Mizrahi’s Spring 1994 collection having unimpressed the world’s fashion critics. Not knowing where his future lies, he starts working on his Fall 1994 clothing line. We witness him coming up with new ideas, researching clothing overseas, auditioning models, gabbing about what inspired him as a child and eventually coordinating the actual presentation of the new line of clothes. Near-disaster strikes when a magazine cover story reveals that another major designer has come up with the same ideas as Mizrahi - and has already executed them. Mizrahi still sallies forth and takes the risk of continuing with his plan, not knowing how the new collection will be received by the fashion world. Mizrahi is a charming specimen: very New York, very Jewish, and very artistic. Not only does he design clothes, but he plays the piano, sings a little, and has a great passion for the campy and the kitschy - which frequently comes to the surface in his clothing lines. Watching the different things that influence him - his mother, The Banana Splits, Nanook of the North, and Call of the Wild - is fascinating. Director Douglas Keeve masterfully uses artistic techniques which enhance the subject matter without overpowering. His most interesting choice was to do the majority of the film in black and white. One would expect color to be of great importance in a work centered on the fashion industry. But by using a variety of grains and tints, he makes us more aware of texture and tone. In addition, the black and white makes the color segments much more striking: especially with Mizrahi’s passion for vibrant Technicolor hues in his clothes. Queer Quotient: A film about the fashion industry and one of the gayest designers out there? Please! A fashion queen will be in hog heaven. The film focuses on his work and doesn’t get into his personal life, and it isn’t outwardly stated that he is gay. But does anybody really wonder? With his chunky frame, crinkly hair, heavy Bronx accent, dark complexion, and frog-croak voice, he could be Harvey Fierstein’s long lost kid brother.

  • Jul 13, 2009

    I give this movie 5 stars! For some reason when I click 5 it only registers 4 1/2. I love Isaac Mizrahi & I think he's talented on so many levels. I adore his performance of De Bussy's Clair de Lune & wish I had the soundtrack to Unzipped. I can see the creativity shining from Isaac's eyes. I hope he has quit smoking!

    I give this movie 5 stars! For some reason when I click 5 it only registers 4 1/2. I love Isaac Mizrahi & I think he's talented on so many levels. I adore his performance of De Bussy's Clair de Lune & wish I had the soundtrack to Unzipped. I can see the creativity shining from Isaac's eyes. I hope he has quit smoking!

  • Jan 10, 2009

    good behind the scenes

    good behind the scenes