Up the Chastity Belt (Naughty Knights) Reviews

  • Jun 10, 2016

    ridiculous low score for a classic comedy, up there with carry on series

    ridiculous low score for a classic comedy, up there with carry on series

  • May 08, 2014

    After the success of the TV series Up Pompeii and the spin-off film that followed. A sequel was greenlit, but producer Ned Sherrin and director Bob Kellett decided to take Frankie Howerd's character of Lurcio, and put him in a medieval setting. This was the resulting film, and there's a lot smutty humour and double entendres on display, but it is a very funny film with a lot of familiar faces in it. As a baby, Lurkalot (Howerd) was kidnapped by Sir Braggart de Bombast (Bill Fraser), and left to die, but he was brought up by a family of pigs that belong to Sir Coward de Custard (Graham Crowden). To earn his way, Lurkalot makes love potions and chastity belts. When Sir Braggart challenges Sir Coward to a duel for offending him, Lurkalot through good luck manages to defeat Sir Braggart's champion Sir Grumbell de Grunt (David Prowse), but Sir Braggart tries to kidnap Sir Coward's daughter Lady Lobelia (Anne Aston), although Lurkalot has her dignity locked up in one of his unbreakable chastity belts, and he's got the key and flees to the Crusades. It's a very silly film, and it's very naughty as well, as there's a scene where it portrays Robin Hood and his Merry Men as a band of of very camp homosexuals, but Howerd gets all the best lines, and there's a good cast of who's who of British film and TV of the 1960's and 1970's, and a few other surprises.

    After the success of the TV series Up Pompeii and the spin-off film that followed. A sequel was greenlit, but producer Ned Sherrin and director Bob Kellett decided to take Frankie Howerd's character of Lurcio, and put him in a medieval setting. This was the resulting film, and there's a lot smutty humour and double entendres on display, but it is a very funny film with a lot of familiar faces in it. As a baby, Lurkalot (Howerd) was kidnapped by Sir Braggart de Bombast (Bill Fraser), and left to die, but he was brought up by a family of pigs that belong to Sir Coward de Custard (Graham Crowden). To earn his way, Lurkalot makes love potions and chastity belts. When Sir Braggart challenges Sir Coward to a duel for offending him, Lurkalot through good luck manages to defeat Sir Braggart's champion Sir Grumbell de Grunt (David Prowse), but Sir Braggart tries to kidnap Sir Coward's daughter Lady Lobelia (Anne Aston), although Lurkalot has her dignity locked up in one of his unbreakable chastity belts, and he's got the key and flees to the Crusades. It's a very silly film, and it's very naughty as well, as there's a scene where it portrays Robin Hood and his Merry Men as a band of of very camp homosexuals, but Howerd gets all the best lines, and there's a good cast of who's who of British film and TV of the 1960's and 1970's, and a few other surprises.

  • Dec 26, 2011

    In truth, the jokes are poor, even terrible, but Frankie Howerds delivery and timing saves them.....well some of them anyway.

    In truth, the jokes are poor, even terrible, but Frankie Howerds delivery and timing saves them.....well some of them anyway.

  • Dec 24, 2011

    Farce which shouldn't be, but is difficult to follow. Apart from one or two good gags there's little to laugh at here.

    Farce which shouldn't be, but is difficult to follow. Apart from one or two good gags there's little to laugh at here.

  • Apr 17, 2009

    "I want a modern girl, who knows how it has to be. Not some old dear whose chained to her chastity." It's a hoot from start to finish, and joyous, a pantomime romp through the annuls of English comedy, a big feature film that contains all the usual mugging from Frankie and some star turns from Bill Fraser (genius), and Ertha Kitt (scrumptious). As Lurkalot tries to find his true birth rite, albeit a story stolen from 'The Prince and the Pauper,' it ambles along for 90 odd minutes encountering a rather camp Robin Hood, and a decidedly familiar Richard the Loinheart. It';s a great rainy day movie, instant sunshine.

    "I want a modern girl, who knows how it has to be. Not some old dear whose chained to her chastity." It's a hoot from start to finish, and joyous, a pantomime romp through the annuls of English comedy, a big feature film that contains all the usual mugging from Frankie and some star turns from Bill Fraser (genius), and Ertha Kitt (scrumptious). As Lurkalot tries to find his true birth rite, albeit a story stolen from 'The Prince and the Pauper,' it ambles along for 90 odd minutes encountering a rather camp Robin Hood, and a decidedly familiar Richard the Loinheart. It';s a great rainy day movie, instant sunshine.

  • Jan 17, 2009

    Usual bit of camp silliness from Howerd. Same cast as was found in Up Pompeii and the later Up the Front.

    Usual bit of camp silliness from Howerd. Same cast as was found in Up Pompeii and the later Up the Front.

  • Oct 13, 2007

    Somehow manages to improve on 'Up Pompeii'. From the genius mind of Ned Sherrin (God rest his soul). My vife has burgled been!

    Somehow manages to improve on 'Up Pompeii'. From the genius mind of Ned Sherrin (God rest his soul). My vife has burgled been!

  • Jul 20, 2007

    Lurkalot: is it true you steal from the rich to give to the poor? Robin Hood: Ooh no. We keep it all for ourselves ducky.

    Lurkalot: is it true you steal from the rich to give to the poor? Robin Hood: Ooh no. We keep it all for ourselves ducky.

  • May 21, 2007

    Naughty hilarity. One of my top five favorites. Best Robin Hood EVER.

    Naughty hilarity. One of my top five favorites. Best Robin Hood EVER.