Wall Street Reviews

  • Jul 08, 2019

    I didn't really get all the stock market jargon but at least it was interesting to see how sneaky the people that are big in the stock market are. Jesus Christ, I would hate to surround myself with these kinds of high class schmucky people. So full of themselves and fake. It's really unsettling to know that there are people that exist that care only about greed and making as much money as they can, almost like a sickness that never goes. This movie takes itself a little too serious and bland for my taste. Really the moral of the story is that going after greed does nothing but destroy a person especially if they have a good heart. Not my kind of movie at all, but it was interesting to see how everything unfolded and how everything went to shit. The best thing in this movie was the Talking Heads soundtrack.

    I didn't really get all the stock market jargon but at least it was interesting to see how sneaky the people that are big in the stock market are. Jesus Christ, I would hate to surround myself with these kinds of high class schmucky people. So full of themselves and fake. It's really unsettling to know that there are people that exist that care only about greed and making as much money as they can, almost like a sickness that never goes. This movie takes itself a little too serious and bland for my taste. Really the moral of the story is that going after greed does nothing but destroy a person especially if they have a good heart. Not my kind of movie at all, but it was interesting to see how everything unfolded and how everything went to shit. The best thing in this movie was the Talking Heads soundtrack.

  • May 31, 2019

    "Greed is good" - Gordon Gekko Oliver Stone's white collar crime drama Wall Street (1987) is a poignant depiction of moral corruption. Stone attempts to critique the rampant greed of Wall Street stock brokers vying to unimaginable wealth, but his film ended up being an inspiration for stock brokers after Wall Street's release. I guess the message of doing what is right despite it not being profitable was lost on audiences, but Wall Street remains a thoughtful commentary of the super wealthy's vapid existence and moral vacancy. Filled with sexual hedonism, moral depravity, limitless greed, casual cocaine usage, and fraud against the working class, Wall Street perseveres as a moral compass gone awry for decades to come. Wall Street still feels relevant today. Oliver Stone's direction is riveting going from stock deal to deal and sleazy encounter one after another. His script is strong filled with quotable lines that have permeated culture into slogans of wealth, greed, and confidence. Though not the intended purpose, Wall Street would spark a new life into the stocks game due to Stone's vivid depiction of the pleasures, grandeur, and opulence of their lifestyle. Stone's script gives plenty of critique for their lack of ethical practices and shows how evil and manipulative insider trading really can be. But Wall Street also provides the reasoning behind their greedy corruption and depicts a decent man falling into the same greed as Gekko. Both Oliver Stone's script and direction are impressive as is his scope of New York's stock scene. Michael Douglas is immaculate as the sleazy con artist Gordon Gekko. This character is iconic, not just for Stone's lines, but for how convincingly Douglas speaks them to life. Douglas gives us the slicked back hair and tailored expensive designer suited look for ages of yuppies to come. While his own performance is astonishing, his subtle cues and hints at his character's motives throughout Wall Street are just as impressive. Douglas transforms himself into a fast talking salesman lacking morals. He is exquisite as Gordon Gekko in Wall Street. Charlie Sheen is great as the eager, yet naive young stockbroker Bud Fox that just wants his own wealth. He downfall and redemption are fascinating as Sheen gives you his all. Martin Sheen plays up the stalwart father figure Carl Fox to his real life son Charlie Sheen. Martin represents the blue collar working man and a man of ideals. His guidance is key in Wall Street and clearly the proper way to life. If only more listened to Martin Sheen's words instead of Michael Douglas' after Wall Street. Notably, Terence Stamp has a key cameo supporting role as an ethical investor named Sir Larry Wildman. His role is a neat representation of a broker with morals that could exist to make profit and help others simultaneously. He is the real role model alongside Martin Sheen's for they do what is right regardless of the consequences. Stamp creates such an unavoidable presence with his acting. Daryl Hannah is pretty good as the shallow girlfriend Darien Taylor only doting on Charlie Sheen's character Bud for his wealth and appearance of ambition. She is the perfect vapid gold digger and a scathing critique of shallow empty women like her. Hannah may only appear to be eye candy for Stone to gaze at, but her character certainly feels like she portrays a woman used by Gekko and Bud for their own uses, while she gets something in return. She plays off Charlie Sheen very well and naturally. I think she gets a hard time for her role in Wall Street rather unfairly. Daryl's character is supposed to be easy to hate. She is not a decent woman, nor a role model. Similarly, I liked Sean Young's fake Kate Gekko performance as well. John C. McGinley is funny as Marvin. Lastly, Hal Holbrook is wise and straight as Lou Manneheim. He gets some memorable scenes like Douglas and Sheen's wisdom passed down to Charlie. Wall Street is simply a rush of avarice into your veins. The sleaze and greed of the 1980's is palpable and on purpose. Oliver Stone directed a classic film deserving of its iconic status in cinema. He captures the 1980's style and shapes it into something to critique anew.

    "Greed is good" - Gordon Gekko Oliver Stone's white collar crime drama Wall Street (1987) is a poignant depiction of moral corruption. Stone attempts to critique the rampant greed of Wall Street stock brokers vying to unimaginable wealth, but his film ended up being an inspiration for stock brokers after Wall Street's release. I guess the message of doing what is right despite it not being profitable was lost on audiences, but Wall Street remains a thoughtful commentary of the super wealthy's vapid existence and moral vacancy. Filled with sexual hedonism, moral depravity, limitless greed, casual cocaine usage, and fraud against the working class, Wall Street perseveres as a moral compass gone awry for decades to come. Wall Street still feels relevant today. Oliver Stone's direction is riveting going from stock deal to deal and sleazy encounter one after another. His script is strong filled with quotable lines that have permeated culture into slogans of wealth, greed, and confidence. Though not the intended purpose, Wall Street would spark a new life into the stocks game due to Stone's vivid depiction of the pleasures, grandeur, and opulence of their lifestyle. Stone's script gives plenty of critique for their lack of ethical practices and shows how evil and manipulative insider trading really can be. But Wall Street also provides the reasoning behind their greedy corruption and depicts a decent man falling into the same greed as Gekko. Both Oliver Stone's script and direction are impressive as is his scope of New York's stock scene. Michael Douglas is immaculate as the sleazy con artist Gordon Gekko. This character is iconic, not just for Stone's lines, but for how convincingly Douglas speaks them to life. Douglas gives us the slicked back hair and tailored expensive designer suited look for ages of yuppies to come. While his own performance is astonishing, his subtle cues and hints at his character's motives throughout Wall Street are just as impressive. Douglas transforms himself into a fast talking salesman lacking morals. He is exquisite as Gordon Gekko in Wall Street. Charlie Sheen is great as the eager, yet naive young stockbroker Bud Fox that just wants his own wealth. He downfall and redemption are fascinating as Sheen gives you his all. Martin Sheen plays up the stalwart father figure Carl Fox to his real life son Charlie Sheen. Martin represents the blue collar working man and a man of ideals. His guidance is key in Wall Street and clearly the proper way to life. If only more listened to Martin Sheen's words instead of Michael Douglas' after Wall Street. Notably, Terence Stamp has a key cameo supporting role as an ethical investor named Sir Larry Wildman. His role is a neat representation of a broker with morals that could exist to make profit and help others simultaneously. He is the real role model alongside Martin Sheen's for they do what is right regardless of the consequences. Stamp creates such an unavoidable presence with his acting. Daryl Hannah is pretty good as the shallow girlfriend Darien Taylor only doting on Charlie Sheen's character Bud for his wealth and appearance of ambition. She is the perfect vapid gold digger and a scathing critique of shallow empty women like her. Hannah may only appear to be eye candy for Stone to gaze at, but her character certainly feels like she portrays a woman used by Gekko and Bud for their own uses, while she gets something in return. She plays off Charlie Sheen very well and naturally. I think she gets a hard time for her role in Wall Street rather unfairly. Daryl's character is supposed to be easy to hate. She is not a decent woman, nor a role model. Similarly, I liked Sean Young's fake Kate Gekko performance as well. John C. McGinley is funny as Marvin. Lastly, Hal Holbrook is wise and straight as Lou Manneheim. He gets some memorable scenes like Douglas and Sheen's wisdom passed down to Charlie. Wall Street is simply a rush of avarice into your veins. The sleaze and greed of the 1980's is palpable and on purpose. Oliver Stone directed a classic film deserving of its iconic status in cinema. He captures the 1980's style and shapes it into something to critique anew.

  • Jan 28, 2019

    Money easily made is money easily lost, or so the old adage goes, and yet there will always be people who are suckered into the dream of becoming rich overnight. In this film, Bud Fox is one of those people. He has talent, he has ambition, he has brains, and yet when confronted by the cold, hard reality of quick cash, Bud Fox folds like an origami swan. Michael Douglas won a well-deserved Academy Award for this, his best performance to date. He has created a slimy character in the form of Gordon Gekko, a man who honestly believes the underhanded activities he promotes are not only a profitable necessity but a patriotic mandate to boot. Gekko's perception of a free market society versus a democratic society is one of the most outstanding cinematic monologues outlining the idea of wealth dominating humanity. Douglas doesn't walk away with the entire show though. Charlie Sheen (as Bud Fox) really comes into his own with this film. "Platoon" gave him the opportunity to shine; "Wall Street" gave him the balls to stretch himself farther than I ever thought he'd be capable. It's a shame to see how far he has fallen since this film. Charlie's father Martin also steals his own portion of the spotlight in a role that should have won him his own Academy Award. His tense stare down with his son in an elevator was magnificent. For her part, Daryl Hannah is one of the most underrated actresses of her generation. She always had a tendency to be shoved into the role of the woman with a pretty face ("Splash," "Roxanne," etc.) and she always had a penchant to instill a vitality and an intellect into those roles far beyond what was written for them. Director Oliver Stone apparently could do no wrong during the latter half of the Eighties. Between this film, "Salvador," "Platoon," "Talk Radio," and "Born on the Fourth of July," Stone crafted a viciously insightful catalog of must-see cinema, shredding every outmoded concept he came across. Stones captures the pompous charisma of high-level stock trading and peels apart the layers until we're left with the unflattering truth. "Wall Street" will always rank high on my list of favorite films from 1987. Maybe it will become one of your favorites, too.

    Money easily made is money easily lost, or so the old adage goes, and yet there will always be people who are suckered into the dream of becoming rich overnight. In this film, Bud Fox is one of those people. He has talent, he has ambition, he has brains, and yet when confronted by the cold, hard reality of quick cash, Bud Fox folds like an origami swan. Michael Douglas won a well-deserved Academy Award for this, his best performance to date. He has created a slimy character in the form of Gordon Gekko, a man who honestly believes the underhanded activities he promotes are not only a profitable necessity but a patriotic mandate to boot. Gekko's perception of a free market society versus a democratic society is one of the most outstanding cinematic monologues outlining the idea of wealth dominating humanity. Douglas doesn't walk away with the entire show though. Charlie Sheen (as Bud Fox) really comes into his own with this film. "Platoon" gave him the opportunity to shine; "Wall Street" gave him the balls to stretch himself farther than I ever thought he'd be capable. It's a shame to see how far he has fallen since this film. Charlie's father Martin also steals his own portion of the spotlight in a role that should have won him his own Academy Award. His tense stare down with his son in an elevator was magnificent. For her part, Daryl Hannah is one of the most underrated actresses of her generation. She always had a tendency to be shoved into the role of the woman with a pretty face ("Splash," "Roxanne," etc.) and she always had a penchant to instill a vitality and an intellect into those roles far beyond what was written for them. Director Oliver Stone apparently could do no wrong during the latter half of the Eighties. Between this film, "Salvador," "Platoon," "Talk Radio," and "Born on the Fourth of July," Stone crafted a viciously insightful catalog of must-see cinema, shredding every outmoded concept he came across. Stones captures the pompous charisma of high-level stock trading and peels apart the layers until we're left with the unflattering truth. "Wall Street" will always rank high on my list of favorite films from 1987. Maybe it will become one of your favorites, too.

  • Dec 30, 2018

    Wall Street is a superb morality tale that accurately reflects the attitudes of Wall St. tycoons while amusingly highlighting the excesses of the '80s. Bud Fox splurges on a Manhattan apartment and immediately overpays for cheap and tacky faux exposed brick walls (which he staples up). An automatic sushi maker appears on his counter. He is so absorbed in making money he can't slow down and enjoy the things or women he buys. Gordon Gekko is like Mitt Romney with Donald Trump's instincts. He is clearly a villain, which is why I'm surprised so many people on Wall St. even today see him as something of a role model, modeling their own dress and demeanor after him. Just enough is revealed about his past to make him believable (he is touchy about the subject of his mother, he went to a cheap college), without trying to make us feel sorry for the psychopathic character. Gekko regurgitates the attitudes of the Wall St. elite in a way that seems authentic. He channels Ayn Rand with his famous "Greed is good" line. He rails against the end of the gold standard, the rise of labor and laments the fall of gilded age tycoons. He is not a capitalist, he is a parasite. (Sir Larry represents more traditional capitalists.) Wall Street remains an entertaining and relevant movie.

    Wall Street is a superb morality tale that accurately reflects the attitudes of Wall St. tycoons while amusingly highlighting the excesses of the '80s. Bud Fox splurges on a Manhattan apartment and immediately overpays for cheap and tacky faux exposed brick walls (which he staples up). An automatic sushi maker appears on his counter. He is so absorbed in making money he can't slow down and enjoy the things or women he buys. Gordon Gekko is like Mitt Romney with Donald Trump's instincts. He is clearly a villain, which is why I'm surprised so many people on Wall St. even today see him as something of a role model, modeling their own dress and demeanor after him. Just enough is revealed about his past to make him believable (he is touchy about the subject of his mother, he went to a cheap college), without trying to make us feel sorry for the psychopathic character. Gekko regurgitates the attitudes of the Wall St. elite in a way that seems authentic. He channels Ayn Rand with his famous "Greed is good" line. He rails against the end of the gold standard, the rise of labor and laments the fall of gilded age tycoons. He is not a capitalist, he is a parasite. (Sir Larry represents more traditional capitalists.) Wall Street remains an entertaining and relevant movie.

  • Nov 16, 2018

    Let's be honest -- you're here for Michael Douglas's legendary turn as Gordon Gekko, aren't you? Well, you very well should be. The performance that got the actor his first and only Oscar as an actor is more than worth the watch. But there's also a lot of other fantastic work surrounding him, namely Charlie and Martin Sheen, who play a terrifically dynamic and meaningful father and son onscreen. Who would've thought, eh? Beyond that, though, you also have a screenplay here that's as worth its salt as you'd expect an Oliver Stone script to be worth. And on the subject of Stone, the movie is framed, shot, and stylized particularly well overall. An enjoyable watch.

    Let's be honest -- you're here for Michael Douglas's legendary turn as Gordon Gekko, aren't you? Well, you very well should be. The performance that got the actor his first and only Oscar as an actor is more than worth the watch. But there's also a lot of other fantastic work surrounding him, namely Charlie and Martin Sheen, who play a terrifically dynamic and meaningful father and son onscreen. Who would've thought, eh? Beyond that, though, you also have a screenplay here that's as worth its salt as you'd expect an Oliver Stone script to be worth. And on the subject of Stone, the movie is framed, shot, and stylized particularly well overall. An enjoyable watch.

  • Nov 05, 2018

    to dive into this professional building.. Wall Street Stone's mean corporate world is unfortunately way too mechanical for it to be cinematic. But within these mundane textbook formula, he does manage to install tiny bits of delightful packets for us to enjoy. These are the bits that survives upon performance. It isn't independently a good movie. It relies a lot upon other factor, which often or not, aren't in its favor. And then, to fill in that void grows impossible even by a skillful filmmaker like Stone. It cannot be completely crafty. It does and ought to be commercial; the script is weaved out accordingly. Wieser and Stone, the writers, fails to keep the crisp alive. It isn't complex as the writers think. In fact, the structure of the script is something that we have seen earlier too. But the only thing that makes it stand alone, is its characters. The characters are immensely intriguing and are three dimensional. The perspective may stay on a single point, but the way the makers fiddle with the characters is what helps them keeps the audience tangled in its world. The performance is the soul reason why is it worth to dive into this professional building. And holding the crown at the center of the stage, Douglas is at his best in here. His monologues, speeches, ideologies and the way he looks at the black and white's of the world; every tiny aspect of it is appealing. His body language and dialogue delivery is what amps up this electrifying tale to a whole new level. Sheen has a parallel role to fill in, but he fails to live up to the power that Douglas oozes in front of him on the screen. Wall Street is a one way street, it doesn't care for the outcome of its methods, similar to its character, unfortunately the repercussions are catastrophic and inevitable.

    to dive into this professional building.. Wall Street Stone's mean corporate world is unfortunately way too mechanical for it to be cinematic. But within these mundane textbook formula, he does manage to install tiny bits of delightful packets for us to enjoy. These are the bits that survives upon performance. It isn't independently a good movie. It relies a lot upon other factor, which often or not, aren't in its favor. And then, to fill in that void grows impossible even by a skillful filmmaker like Stone. It cannot be completely crafty. It does and ought to be commercial; the script is weaved out accordingly. Wieser and Stone, the writers, fails to keep the crisp alive. It isn't complex as the writers think. In fact, the structure of the script is something that we have seen earlier too. But the only thing that makes it stand alone, is its characters. The characters are immensely intriguing and are three dimensional. The perspective may stay on a single point, but the way the makers fiddle with the characters is what helps them keeps the audience tangled in its world. The performance is the soul reason why is it worth to dive into this professional building. And holding the crown at the center of the stage, Douglas is at his best in here. His monologues, speeches, ideologies and the way he looks at the black and white's of the world; every tiny aspect of it is appealing. His body language and dialogue delivery is what amps up this electrifying tale to a whole new level. Sheen has a parallel role to fill in, but he fails to live up to the power that Douglas oozes in front of him on the screen. Wall Street is a one way street, it doesn't care for the outcome of its methods, similar to its character, unfortunately the repercussions are catastrophic and inevitable.

  • Sep 15, 2018

    A- An exceptional performance from Michael Douglas and Oliver Stone's direction are why the film works (and still holds up) as well as it does.

    A- An exceptional performance from Michael Douglas and Oliver Stone's direction are why the film works (and still holds up) as well as it does.

  • Jul 30, 2018

    Wall Street is something that I've been interested in seeing mainly because of Oliver Stone and Michael Douglas. The story is mostly focuses on Charlie Sheen's character, Bud Fox who is a stockbroker who becomes involved with Gordon Gekko played by Michael Douglas and yes, wouldn't you know it? He won an Oscar for his performance as Gordon Gekko. Amazing! This movie reminds me of The Wolf of Wall Street. Seems similar. Charlie Sheen had been previously working with Oliver Stone in Platoon which I haven't seen it yet. Michael Douglas is fantastic as Gordon Gekko and he did the execution of the character fantastically and he steals the show in every single scene he's been in and he says a line that I suppose many people remembered saying "Greed, for lack of a better word, is good." His acting in this is just flawless. Daryl Hannah is an obviously interesting choice but aside from that, she won a Razzie Award for Worst Supporting Actress. Why is that? I don't know why. Who knows. Martin Sheen plays Bud Fox's father. Charlie and Martin are both family in real life. They both did well in this film. I really, really enjoyed Wall Street and Michael Douglas is the best thing about it. In fact, this is the only film that ever won both an Oscar and a Golden Razzie. How ironic is that? While not the best film of Oliver Stone, it is still an very good experience.

    Wall Street is something that I've been interested in seeing mainly because of Oliver Stone and Michael Douglas. The story is mostly focuses on Charlie Sheen's character, Bud Fox who is a stockbroker who becomes involved with Gordon Gekko played by Michael Douglas and yes, wouldn't you know it? He won an Oscar for his performance as Gordon Gekko. Amazing! This movie reminds me of The Wolf of Wall Street. Seems similar. Charlie Sheen had been previously working with Oliver Stone in Platoon which I haven't seen it yet. Michael Douglas is fantastic as Gordon Gekko and he did the execution of the character fantastically and he steals the show in every single scene he's been in and he says a line that I suppose many people remembered saying "Greed, for lack of a better word, is good." His acting in this is just flawless. Daryl Hannah is an obviously interesting choice but aside from that, she won a Razzie Award for Worst Supporting Actress. Why is that? I don't know why. Who knows. Martin Sheen plays Bud Fox's father. Charlie and Martin are both family in real life. They both did well in this film. I really, really enjoyed Wall Street and Michael Douglas is the best thing about it. In fact, this is the only film that ever won both an Oscar and a Golden Razzie. How ironic is that? While not the best film of Oliver Stone, it is still an very good experience.

  • May 08, 2018

    The Boring Wolf of Wall Street.

    The Boring Wolf of Wall Street.

  • Apr 03, 2018

    Greed might be good, but too much tecnical trader jargon isn't.

    Greed might be good, but too much tecnical trader jargon isn't.