Where Danger Lives Reviews

  • Mar 02, 2018

    Robert Mitchum gets himself into trouble by falling for a suicidal femme fatale who is brought into the hospital where he works as a doctor. He really falls hard, ditching his steady nurse girlfriend and spending all of his time with the mysterious and very wealthy young Margo (played by Faith Domergue in her debut picture). Soon, Mitchum is in a direct confrontation with her father (Claude Rains, in a brief but showy turn) that leaves him on the run to Mexico with Margo by his side. They get waylaid in a few hick towns and nearly caught by the police (or were they?) until, in the end, fate catches up with them (as you knew it would). Straightforward noir with no real frills but Mitchum is always great to watch, with his devil-may-care attitude and constant nonchalance - even here where he spends half of the movie concussed. Director John Farrow (Mia's dad) directed a few noirs (The Big Clock and Night has a Thousand Eyes, 1948) but was more of an all-rounder. Worth a look for aficionados.

    Robert Mitchum gets himself into trouble by falling for a suicidal femme fatale who is brought into the hospital where he works as a doctor. He really falls hard, ditching his steady nurse girlfriend and spending all of his time with the mysterious and very wealthy young Margo (played by Faith Domergue in her debut picture). Soon, Mitchum is in a direct confrontation with her father (Claude Rains, in a brief but showy turn) that leaves him on the run to Mexico with Margo by his side. They get waylaid in a few hick towns and nearly caught by the police (or were they?) until, in the end, fate catches up with them (as you knew it would). Straightforward noir with no real frills but Mitchum is always great to watch, with his devil-may-care attitude and constant nonchalance - even here where he spends half of the movie concussed. Director John Farrow (Mia's dad) directed a few noirs (The Big Clock and Night has a Thousand Eyes, 1948) but was more of an all-rounder. Worth a look for aficionados.

  • Jan 16, 2018

    Quite misleading promotional poster as veteran actor Claude Rains part is only a minor one at best no more than 10 minutes at least, yet he still receives third credit after Mitchum and Domergue. Robert Mitchum plays doctor Jeff Cameron falling heavy for suicidal patient, Margo (Faith Domergue). Viewers know more about her as movie progresses.

    Quite misleading promotional poster as veteran actor Claude Rains part is only a minor one at best no more than 10 minutes at least, yet he still receives third credit after Mitchum and Domergue. Robert Mitchum plays doctor Jeff Cameron falling heavy for suicidal patient, Margo (Faith Domergue). Viewers know more about her as movie progresses.

  • Nov 15, 2016

    Mitchum stars as a dedicated young doctor who falls in love with Faith Domergue, a young woman who ends up in his emergency room after a suicide attempt. He romances her and ends up confronting her "father", Claude Rains, looking for permission to marry her. Turns out Rains is actually her husband, and he ends up dead. Mitchum and Domergue end up on the run together, with Mitchum suffering from a gradually worsening concussion. Mitchum is great as the confused, disoriented protagonist of this noir who slowly comes to realize that Domergue has pretty much lied to him about everything. Domergue is not so great, but she's serviceable and has some nice moments late in the film. Rains is amazing in a sleazy, menacing part that lasts only a few minutes, but does feature him beating Mitchum with a poker.

    Mitchum stars as a dedicated young doctor who falls in love with Faith Domergue, a young woman who ends up in his emergency room after a suicide attempt. He romances her and ends up confronting her "father", Claude Rains, looking for permission to marry her. Turns out Rains is actually her husband, and he ends up dead. Mitchum and Domergue end up on the run together, with Mitchum suffering from a gradually worsening concussion. Mitchum is great as the confused, disoriented protagonist of this noir who slowly comes to realize that Domergue has pretty much lied to him about everything. Domergue is not so great, but she's serviceable and has some nice moments late in the film. Rains is amazing in a sleazy, menacing part that lasts only a few minutes, but does feature him beating Mitchum with a poker.

  • Apr 24, 2013

    A routine film noir enlivened by the performances of Robert Mitchum and Claude Rains but hamstrung by an ending that is too silly for words.

    A routine film noir enlivened by the performances of Robert Mitchum and Claude Rains but hamstrung by an ending that is too silly for words.

  • Feb 22, 2013

    Mitch Caught In The Tentacals Of A Dangerous Female--Entertaining but trite!!

    Mitch Caught In The Tentacals Of A Dangerous Female--Entertaining but trite!!

  • Bruce B Super Reviewer
    Nov 05, 2012

    A awesome film Noir with Robert Mitchum who plays a doctor who has fallen in love with a Dangerous women, who murders her husband. After the murder they head to Mexico trying to cover there tracks, 4 stars

    A awesome film Noir with Robert Mitchum who plays a doctor who has fallen in love with a Dangerous women, who murders her husband. After the murder they head to Mexico trying to cover there tracks, 4 stars

  • Aug 18, 2011

    "Where Danger Lives" (1950): Doctor Robert Mitchum falls for suicidal patient Faith Domergue. He finds her married to the super evil Claude Rains, which makes the lovers' romance get all twisted up. Out of anger, Claude attacks Bob with a poker, and in self defense Bob pushes him to the ground. Claude's dead. The lovers run off. I thought this was a very good film noir. John Farrow as usual does a fantastic job directing, and I felt he really captures the nightmarish feeling that attaches to the plot. The cinematography and score match up, and there's way more pros than cons for this film. The downside is Domergue's way over the top acting, but Mitchum and Rains save the day. 3.5 Stars.

    "Where Danger Lives" (1950): Doctor Robert Mitchum falls for suicidal patient Faith Domergue. He finds her married to the super evil Claude Rains, which makes the lovers' romance get all twisted up. Out of anger, Claude attacks Bob with a poker, and in self defense Bob pushes him to the ground. Claude's dead. The lovers run off. I thought this was a very good film noir. John Farrow as usual does a fantastic job directing, and I felt he really captures the nightmarish feeling that attaches to the plot. The cinematography and score match up, and there's way more pros than cons for this film. The downside is Domergue's way over the top acting, but Mitchum and Rains save the day. 3.5 Stars.

  • Aug 02, 2011

    How does Claude Rains always get beautiful young women as his on screen wife? Although the wife always ends up unhappy... (see 'Notorious' and 'Passionate Friends') But he gets killed quickly... and Robert Mitchum is on the run with the widow, as they are the 'accidental' murderers. Great noir here, very underrated. I guess it doesn't live up to the classics as the story is pretty short and thin even at average noir lengths.

    How does Claude Rains always get beautiful young women as his on screen wife? Although the wife always ends up unhappy... (see 'Notorious' and 'Passionate Friends') But he gets killed quickly... and Robert Mitchum is on the run with the widow, as they are the 'accidental' murderers. Great noir here, very underrated. I guess it doesn't live up to the classics as the story is pretty short and thin even at average noir lengths.

  • May 26, 2011

    Stylish film noir from director John Farrow suffers from a number of credibility-stretching plot contrivances, but a tense, palpable atmosphere of seedy paranoia sees it through. Robert Mitchum offers his patented cool in the lead, with Faith Domergue appropriately unstable as the femme fatale; though Claud Rains is relegated to a brief, though pivotal, cameo. It has its flaws, but there's a lot for noir fans to appreciate.

    Stylish film noir from director John Farrow suffers from a number of credibility-stretching plot contrivances, but a tense, palpable atmosphere of seedy paranoia sees it through. Robert Mitchum offers his patented cool in the lead, with Faith Domergue appropriately unstable as the femme fatale; though Claud Rains is relegated to a brief, though pivotal, cameo. It has its flaws, but there's a lot for noir fans to appreciate.

  • May 21, 2011

    Fairly standard noir piece by director John Farrow. The plot is not interesting enough to make you keep watching but the nightmarish and hallucinatory qualities make it worth watching.

    Fairly standard noir piece by director John Farrow. The plot is not interesting enough to make you keep watching but the nightmarish and hallucinatory qualities make it worth watching.