Wild Geese 2 Reviews

  • Jul 07, 2019

    I'd like to see the fucker first! :-( Where is it?

    I'd like to see the fucker first! :-( Where is it?

  • Jun 07, 2018

    This was a believable film in its day. I saw it on Cinemax back in the 1980s and it has stuck with me though Ive not seen it since.

    This was a believable film in its day. I saw it on Cinemax back in the 1980s and it has stuck with me though Ive not seen it since.

  • Apr 20, 2013

    When I bought the original The Wild Geese (mostly for nostalgic reasons) on Blu-ray I got The Wild Geese II on DVD included. I would probably not have bought it otherwise. This movie is typical example of the "follow ups" that where done in the 80's. Base it loosely on the title of the original, none of the original actors are present, give it zero budget. In short this movie is lousy. Why it was made, apart from being a cheap attempt to squeeze some more money from the success of the original, is beyond me. It is claimed that Richard Burton was going to reprise his role in this one but that he died before he could do it. I would be surprised if Richard Burton would have accepted to play in this movie. At least not without some major rewrites. The story is dubious to say the least. Sure the story in the original was not very ground breaking either but in the original The Wild Geese the actors had charisma. Richard Burton was the infallible (almost) though guy that knew what he was doing. In this one Scott Glenn runs around looking like a wimp and generally do not really seem to know what he is doing. He gets captured by the oldest of tricks. He is too stupid to realize the most obvious of things, like that the girl might need protection. There is little of the actual mercenary action that was present in the original one. The good guys mostly walk around scouting, planning or screwing up. The little enjoyment that can be found is in the performance of Edward Fox who is also the only guy who remotely seems to know what he is doing. The end is just silly. All that effort, not the least by the viewer having watched this crap to the end, is simply wasted.

    When I bought the original The Wild Geese (mostly for nostalgic reasons) on Blu-ray I got The Wild Geese II on DVD included. I would probably not have bought it otherwise. This movie is typical example of the "follow ups" that where done in the 80's. Base it loosely on the title of the original, none of the original actors are present, give it zero budget. In short this movie is lousy. Why it was made, apart from being a cheap attempt to squeeze some more money from the success of the original, is beyond me. It is claimed that Richard Burton was going to reprise his role in this one but that he died before he could do it. I would be surprised if Richard Burton would have accepted to play in this movie. At least not without some major rewrites. The story is dubious to say the least. Sure the story in the original was not very ground breaking either but in the original The Wild Geese the actors had charisma. Richard Burton was the infallible (almost) though guy that knew what he was doing. In this one Scott Glenn runs around looking like a wimp and generally do not really seem to know what he is doing. He gets captured by the oldest of tricks. He is too stupid to realize the most obvious of things, like that the girl might need protection. There is little of the actual mercenary action that was present in the original one. The good guys mostly walk around scouting, planning or screwing up. The little enjoyment that can be found is in the performance of Edward Fox who is also the only guy who remotely seems to know what he is doing. The end is just silly. All that effort, not the least by the viewer having watched this crap to the end, is simply wasted.

  • Apr 17, 2013

    7 years after The Wild Geese came out, producer Euan Lloyd set about adapting Daniel Carney's 1982 book The Square Circle as a sequel to The Wild Geese, he signed up director Peter Hunt (On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969) and Gold (1974) to direct it. But it was a production fraught with difficulties, and it sank without trace, and it's no surprise, as it has no returning cast from the first film, which makes this more of a cash-in than a sequel. Nazi leader Rudolf Hess (Laurence Olivier) is behind bars, but he has secrets that could bring down world governments, and now people are out to kill him. Alex Faulkner (Edward Fox) is assigned by Robert McCann (Robert Webber) and Michael and Kathy Lukas (John Terry and Barbara Carrera) to go and rescue the elderly Hess. Knowing the risks, Faulkner refuses, but he recommends Lebanese-American soldier John Haddad (Scott Glenn) to do the job. Haddad agrees, and goes to West Berlin, but no sooner than he arrives than he is abducted by East German spy Karl Stroebling (Robert Freitag), but Haddad is prepared to finish the job. It's a dull film sadly, and it has non of the excitement of the original film, mainly because it's moved from an African adventure to a Cold War espionage thriller. Richard Burton was to have been in it, but he died days before filming started, what a shame.

    7 years after The Wild Geese came out, producer Euan Lloyd set about adapting Daniel Carney's 1982 book The Square Circle as a sequel to The Wild Geese, he signed up director Peter Hunt (On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969) and Gold (1974) to direct it. But it was a production fraught with difficulties, and it sank without trace, and it's no surprise, as it has no returning cast from the first film, which makes this more of a cash-in than a sequel. Nazi leader Rudolf Hess (Laurence Olivier) is behind bars, but he has secrets that could bring down world governments, and now people are out to kill him. Alex Faulkner (Edward Fox) is assigned by Robert McCann (Robert Webber) and Michael and Kathy Lukas (John Terry and Barbara Carrera) to go and rescue the elderly Hess. Knowing the risks, Faulkner refuses, but he recommends Lebanese-American soldier John Haddad (Scott Glenn) to do the job. Haddad agrees, and goes to West Berlin, but no sooner than he arrives than he is abducted by East German spy Karl Stroebling (Robert Freitag), but Haddad is prepared to finish the job. It's a dull film sadly, and it has non of the excitement of the original film, mainly because it's moved from an African adventure to a Cold War espionage thriller. Richard Burton was to have been in it, but he died days before filming started, what a shame.

  • Jul 11, 2012

    Ingrid Pitt as "the hooker"...better than I remembered, still a load of pony, albeit watchable pony with a good Roy Budd score.

    Ingrid Pitt as "the hooker"...better than I remembered, still a load of pony, albeit watchable pony with a good Roy Budd score.

  • Jul 05, 2011

    Not good, but not too bad. Takes a while to get going, but then the action is pretty good. Ending is a bit lame, and unnecessary. The movie could have been ended 10-15 minutes earlier. Scott Glenn gives his usual wooden performance, and Edward Fox is his usual iritating self. Sir Laurence Olivier, as Rudolf Hess, gives the only decent perforance of the movie.

    Not good, but not too bad. Takes a while to get going, but then the action is pretty good. Ending is a bit lame, and unnecessary. The movie could have been ended 10-15 minutes earlier. Scott Glenn gives his usual wooden performance, and Edward Fox is his usual iritating self. Sir Laurence Olivier, as Rudolf Hess, gives the only decent perforance of the movie.