The Bob Newhart Show: Season 1 (1972 - 1973)


Season 1
The Bob Newhart Show

Critics Consensus

No consensus yet.

Not enough ratings to
calculate a score.

TOMATOMETER

Critic Ratings: 4

No Score Yet

Audience Score

User Ratings: 4

Rate And Review

User image

Verified

  • User image

    Super Reviewer

    Rate this season

    Oof, that was Rotten.

    Meh, it passed the time.

    It’s good – I’d recommend it.

    Awesome!

    So Fresh: Absolute Must See!

    What did you think of this tv season? (optional)



  • User image

    Super Reviewer

    Step 2 of 2

    How did you buy your ticket?

    Let's get your review verified.

    You're almost there! Just confirm how you got your ticket.

  • User image

    Super Reviewer

    Rate this season

    Oof, that was Rotten.

    Meh, it passed the time.

    It’s good – I’d recommend it.

    Awesome!

    So Fresh: Absolute Must See!

    What did you think of this tv season? (optional)

  • How did you buy your ticket?

Episodes

Air date: Sep 17, 1972

Though not the first episode of The Bob Newhart Show to be filmed, "Fly the Unfriendly Skies" was chosen as the series' premiere telecast on September 16, 1972. Bob Hartley's "Fear of Flying" workshop has booked plane passage from Chicago to New York. Emily supportively goes along on her husband Bob's maiden flight, neglecting to mention, until the last moment, that she too is terrified of flying. A pre-Laverne and Shirley Penny Marshall appears as the stewardess. "Fly the Unfriendly Skies" was written by series creators David Davis and Lorenzo Music.

View Details
Air date: Sep 23, 1972

Bob's feelings are hurt when he is not invited to speak before Emily's third-grade students on Vocation Day. Though she feels Bob's pain, Emily can't bring herself to admit that she thinks Bob will not be able to "thrill" the kids with his speech. Her fears come to full fruition when Bob is called in to speak at the very last minute. King Moody, best known as "Ronald McDonald" in a series of fast-food commercials, is here cast as a fireman. Written by Carl Gottlieb and George Yanook, "Tracy Grammar School, I'll Lick You Yet" first aired on September 23, 1972.

View Details
Air date: Sep 30, 1972

Bob's newest patient is Stan Connors (Peter Brown), a handsome tennis instructor. Stan's problem: His female students are irresistibly attracted by him, and he is incapable of resisting their romantic overtures. Bob's problem: his own wife, Emily, is Stan's latest customer. Also in the cast are Barbara Barnett as Cheryl, Pat Lysinger as Marci, and Kit Smythe as a very pregnant lady. Written by David Davis and Lorenzo Music, "Tennis, Emily?" originally aired on September 30, 1972.

View Details
Air date: Oct 7, 1972

Martha Scott makes the first of several appearances as Bob Hartley's supremely judgmental mother. During Mrs. Hartley's latest visit, Bob would like to tell his mother that he loves her, but the words just won't come out. Emily tries to get to the root of Bob's problems, and even comes up with a logical -- if circuitous -- solution. Written by the comedy team of Dick Clair and Jenna McMahon, "Mom, I L-L-Love You" was first telecast on October 7, 1972.

View Details
Air date: Oct 21, 1972

Though Emily does not look forward to a visit from Bob's former girlfriend, Nancy (Penny Fuller), and Nancy's husband, Chuck (Dick Schall), Bob is in a state of anticipatory glee. It seems that Nancy had thrown over Bob in favor of Chuck; now, convinced that Nancy is still carrying a torch for him, Bob wants to have the honor of rejecting her. Future Hill Street Blues co-star James B. Sikking appears as Dick. First telecast on October 21, 1972 (after being pre-empted from its scheduled October 14 playdate), "Goodnight, Nancy" was written by Susan Silver.

View Details
Air date: Oct 28, 1972

Bob's secretary, Carol, wants to move in with her new boyfriend, Roger Dixon (Eugene Troobnick), who has recently separated from his wife. All Carol needs for her own peace of mind is Bob's approval -- but that approval is not forthcoming. As a result, Carol's work performance suffers spectacularly, forcing Bob and Emily to break their self-promise not to meddle in other people's romantic affairs. This episode is the first appearance of Emil Peterson (John Fiedler). Written by Jerry Mayer, "Come Live With Me" first aired on October 28, 1972.

View Details
Air date: Nov 4, 1972

Howard Borden is convinced that his son, Howie (Moosie Drier), no longer cares for him. His trepidations seem to be given weight when, during their usual four-days-per-month visitation period, Howie would rather spend his time with Jerry. It is up to ex-wife Lois to restore Howard's shaky self-esteem. Written by Tom Patchett and Jay Tarses, "Father Knows Worst" originally aired on November 4, 1972.

View Details
Air date: Nov 11, 1972

Bob and Emily adopt a policy whereby they will resolve any and all arguments before going to bed. This new policy is put to the supreme test when Emily asks that Bob spend time with her on Monday evenings, while Bob insists upon watching the weekly network football game. Determined to reach a compromise, the Hartleys succeed only in depriving themselves of a good night's sleep. Written by Gene Thompson, "Don't Go to Bed Mad" first aired on November 11, 1972.

View Details
Air date: Nov 18, 1972

After attending a party where virtually all the guests are doting parents, Bob and Emily are even more determined to conceive. Finally, they discuss the possibility of adopting a child, and the benefits and drawbacks attending such a decision. The large supporting cast includes Louise Lasser as Mrs. Radford, William Redfield as Arthur Hoover, and M. Emmet Walsh as Jack Hoover. Written by David Davis and Lorenzo Music, "P-I-L-O-T" was originally written to be the pilot episode for the series. After several changes, including Newhart's insistence that he didn't want to be in a show "about kids," the series was held back from release until November 18, 1972, by which time the series was firmly entrenched in the ratings.

View Details
Air date: Nov 25, 1972

Returning from a Mexican vacation, Bob discovers that Jerry has decided to marry his gorgeous oral hygienist, Cynthia Fremont (Elaine Giftos), whom he has known for all of nine days. Love being blind, Jerry is oblivious to the fact that Cynthia is pushy and domineering. Though Bob tries to remain aloof, he realizes that Jerry is on the verge of making the biggest mistake of his life. Written by Martin Cohan, "Anything Happen While I Was Gone?" first aired on November 25, 1972.

View Details
Show More Episodes

The Bob Newhart Show: Season 1 Photos

Tv Season Info

Critic Reviews for The Bob Newhart Show Season 1

All Critics (4) | Top Critics (2)

I was hoping for better things from the Bob Newhart Show, but the opening episode was a disappointment.

Feb 9, 2021 | Full Review…

On paper the new offering figured to be a winner... The opener, however, was an entirely routine sitcom episode with hardly a sign of the witty writing and bright ensemble playing that makes Mary [Tyler Moore]'s program such a delight.

Feb 8, 2021 | Full Review…

It has a couple of chuckles, but no originality. Both actors do a good job, as a psychiatrist and his wife, but that just isn't enough.

Feb 9, 2021 | Full Review…

Suzanne Pleshette is a very appealing actress who deserves a lot better than what she is given on this show. What she is given on this show is Bob Newhart, and no laugh lines, a burdensome second fiddle.

Feb 8, 2021 | Full Review…

Audience Reviews for The Bob Newhart Show: Season 1

  • Dec 19, 2020
    Wry humor about daily life, no pratfalls or other idiocy. Holds up beautifully.
  • Jul 11, 2019
    Still great! Holds up as a classic!

News & Features