Twin Peaks: Season 2 (1990 - 1991)

SEASON:

Season 2
Twin Peaks

Critics Consensus

Twin Peaks answers its central question with diminishing returns while struggling to establish worthy new mysteries, but there are enough mesmeric flourishes to keep devotees dreaming of what lies in the Red Room.

63%

TOMATOMETER

Critic Ratings: 40

88%

Audience Score

User Ratings: 735

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Episodes

Air date: Sep 30, 1990

The first episode of the second season of Twin Peaks, "May the Giant Be With You," originally aired on September 10, 1990, and was directed by series creator David Lynch. This episode features turning points for some major characters as well as several occurrences of supernatural visions. The wounded Agent Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) has his first visions of the Giant (Carel Struycken), who gives him three clues and takes his ring. At One-Eyed Jacks, the disguised Audrey (Sherilyn Fenn) manages to avoid her father as a client and gets imprisoned by Blackie (Victoria Catlin). Now that Jacques is dead, Leland's (Ray Wise) hair has turned white and his previous grieving has turned to insane happiness, in which he dances and sings "Mairzy Dotes." Donna (Lara Flynn Boyle) also goes through some changes by wearing Laura's sunglasses, smoking cigarettes, and volunteering for the Meals on Wheels program. Maddy (Sheryl Lee) has a brutal vision, and Major Briggs (Don Davis) has his own vivid dream, which he shares with his son, Bobby. At the Sheriff's office, Albert Rosenfeld (Miguel Ferrer) returns and forms a theory with Agent Cooper about the night of Laura's death, which includes the presence of the killer, BOB. After the mill fire, Josie and Catherine are missing, and Shelly and Pete are in the hospital. As Leo (Eric Da Re) barely survives in a coma, the last known living person at the murder scene -- Ronette Pulaski (Phoebe Augustine) -- starts to awaken from her coma to have disturbing visions.

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Air date: Oct 6, 1990

Episode nine of Twin Peaks, "Coma," originally aired on October 6, 1990, and was directed by series creator David Lynch. This episode contains the first of many significant references to owls throughout the series. Agent Cooper learns his old partner, Windom Earle, has escaped a mental institution and is missing. Taking over Laura's old job with Meals on Wheels, Donna delivers food to Mrs. Tremond (Frances Bay) and the magical boy (played by the director's son, Austin Jack Lynch), who delivers the message: "J'ai une âme solitaire," meaning "I have a lonely soul." When the deal with the Icelandic investors gets thwarted by a crazed Leland, Ben and Jerry threaten a scheme to get rid of him. Meanwhile, Bobby and Shelly begin a scheme of their own to deal with the still-comatose Leo. After the Log Lady tells Major Briggs to deliver the message, he meets with Agent Cooper and shows him the message: "The owls are not what they seem." After learning details about Laura's connection to One-Eyed Jacks, Audrey is caught by Blackie. She calls Agent Cooper for help, who is having a dream in which the Giant gives him another clue.

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Air date: Oct 13, 1990

Episode ten of Twin Peaks, "The Man Behind Glass," originally aired on October 13, 1990, and was directed by Lesli Linka Glatter. Agent Cooper tells Albert and Truman about the giant from his dreams, and he finds a letter "B" under Ronette Pulaski's fingernail. He then charts a diagram for the letters he has found so far (R, B, and T). Secretary Lucy Moran (Kimmy Robertson) meets department store clerk Dick Tremayne (Ian Buchanan) for lunch at the Double R diner as she continues to question whether the father of her baby is Dick or the possibly sterile Andy. The One-Armed Man (Al Strobel) comes by the Sheriff's office to sell shoes, but he goes into spasms after seeing the sketch of BOB, leading Cooper to remember one of the giant's messages. At One-Eyed Jacks, Blackie (Victoria Catlin), Nancy (Galyn Gorg), and Jean Renault (Michael Parks) hold Audrey hostage and shoot her with drugs in a scheme to get revenge on Cooper. Meanwhile, James and Maddy are growing closer, and Donna gets angry after seeing them together. At the hospital, a hypnotized Dr. Jacoby reveals that he saw Leland kill Jacques Renault, resulting in Cooper arriving at the Palmer household to arrest Leland. That night, Donna goes to Harold Smith's (Lenny Von Dohlen) house and finds Laura's secret diary.

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Air date: Oct 20, 1990

Episode 11 of Twin Peaks, "Laura's Secret Diary," originally aired on October 20, 1990, and was directed by Todd Holland. At the Sheriff's office, Cooper and Truman interrogate Leland about the murder of Jacques Renault. Andy takes another sterility test to find out if he is capable of being the father of Lucy's baby, while Dick Tremayne offers money for an abortion. At the Double R diner, Donna enlists Maddy's help in a plan to get Laura's diary away from Harold. Meanwhile, Emory Battis (Don Amendolia) is killed and Jean Renault (Michael Parks) shows Ben a video of Audrey, who is still held hostage and drugged at One-Eyed Jacks. When Cooper is required to deliver the ransom money to save Audrey, he asks Truman for the help of the Bookhouse boys. Many characters enter the town of Twin Peaks in this episode: Judge Clinton Sternwood (Royal Dano) arrives at the station; Josie Packard returns with her so-called cousin, Jonathan (Mak Takano); and the elusive Mr. Tojamura (credited as Fumio Yanoguchi) checks into the Great Northern Hotel.

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Air date: Oct 27, 1990

Episode 12 of Twin Peaks, "The Orchid's Curse," originally aired on October 27, 1990, and was directed by Graeme Clifford. This episode features guest star David L. Lander (Squiggy from Laverne & Shirley) as Mr. Pinkel, a salesman who demonstrates equipment to Bobby and Shelly to care for the invalid Leo, who is deemed unable to stand trial. The pregnant Lucy leaves town for a few days, while Deputy Andy Brennan learns that he has a healthy sperm count. Leland Palmer has his trial and is released on bail after Sheriff Truman testifies in his favor. Judge Sternwood (Royal Dano) tells Cooper: "Keep your eye on the woods." At the Great Northern Hotel, the mysterious investor Mr. Tojamura wants in on the Ghostwood Estates deal, with an offer of a large sum of money to Ben Horne. That evening, Jean Renault calls Ben and Cooper with instructions on the ransom exchange for Audrey. Cooper and Truman raid One-Eyed Jacks and are followed by Hank Jennings. They save Audrey with the unexpected help of Deputy Hawk, Blackie is killed, and Jean captures Hank. Meanwhile, Donna and Maddy attempt to steal Laura's secret diary from the increasingly unstable Harold Smith.

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Air date: Nov 3, 1990

Episode 13 of Twin Peaks, "Demons," originally aired on November 3, 1990, and was directed by Lesli Linka Glatter. This episode offers important information on the nature of Killer Bob as a spirit who requires a human host. Donna and Maddy fail at their mission to steal Laura's diary when Harold goes mad and threatens them. After James saves them, Maddy begs him to forget about her and get back with Donna. Agent Cooper takes the rescued Audrey to the Bookhouse. After finding out it was Jean Renault who trying to kill him at One-Eyed Jacks, Cooper returns the ransom money to Ben, who pleads ignorant of the whole scheme. Cooper's supervisor, Chief Gordon Cole (played by series creator David Lynch), arrives in Twin Peaks with a lab report and a message from Windom Earle in the form of a chess move. Josie makes a deal with Ben, gets her money, and is forced to leave town with Jonathan. At the Great Northern Hotel, Mr. Tojomura and Ben have a confrontation, but are interrupted by the crazed Leland's song and dance. The episode ends with the interrogation of the One-Armed Man, who reveals clues about Killer Bob by way of his schizophrenic other self, Mike.

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Air date: Nov 10, 1990

Originally broadcast on November 10, 1990, Episode 14 of Twin Peaks, "Lonely Souls," was written by Mark Frost and directed by David Lynch. This pivotal episode answers some of the series' long-running questions, as well as providing insight into Laura Palmer's killer. Featuring guest singer Julee Cruise, the brutal ending scenes flash between realities. In the morning, Maddy tells Leland and Sarah that she plans to go back to Missoula, MO. Meanwhile, Deputy Hawk searches the murder scene at Harold Smith's house, finding what is left of Laura's secret diary and a suicide note reading "J'ai une ame solitaire" ("I have a lonely soul"). Trying to solve his money problems, Bobby searches Leo's boots and finds some incriminating evidence. Audrey confronts her father about One-Eyed Jacks, and Ben reveals his connection to Laura. After looking over the diary, Cooper has Ben dragged out of his office and placed in a holding cell. At the Blue Pine Lodge, Pete Martell (Jack Nance) discovers the hidden identity of the mysterious Mr. Tojamura. That evening at the Palmers' house, Maddy smells burning oil, Sarah sees a vision of the white horse, and BOB reveals himself. At the Roadhouse, the Log Lady knows what is going on and Cooper sees a vision of the Giant, who warns, "It is happening again."

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Air date: Nov 17, 1990

Episode 15 of Twin Peaks, "Drive With a Dead Girl," originally aired on November 17, 1990, and was directed by Caleb Deschanel. When incompetent lawyer Jerry Horne arrives to represent his brother, Ben, they share a dream sequence from their past of Louise Dombrowski (Emily Fincher) dancing with a flashlight. Lucy arrives back at the Sheriff's office with her sister, Gwen (Kathleen Wilhoite), and the now-fertile Andy faints after seeing Lucy holding a baby. At the Double R Diner, Norma's mother, Vivian (Jane Greer), arrives with her new husband, Ernie (James Booth), who has a secret connection to Hank. Pete Martell visits Ben's jail cell with a tape-recorded proposition from the formerly disguised Catherine that may get him released if he cooperates. Meanwhile, Bobby listens to the tape he found in Leo's boots and plans his own proposition for Ben. Cooper and Truman encounter the unstable Leland, who drives recklessly, sings "Surrey With the Fringe on Top," and dances with his golf club. Cooper has the One-Armed Man examine Ben, leading Cooper to believe that Ben is not the killer. Truman charges Ben with the murder of Laura Palmer, and, for the first time, questions Cooper's investigation tactics. That evening, the body of Madeline Ferguson is found by the water, wrapped in plastic.

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Air date: Dec 1, 1990

Episode 16 of Twin Peaks, "Arbitrary Law," originally aired on December 1, 1990, and was directed by Tim Hunter. This episode features the elusive elements of Cooper's dream from Episode Two finally coming together to crack the case. The evidence shows that Maddy's killer was the same as Laura's, and Albert Rosenfeld and Deputy Hawk show faith in Cooper's declaration that he needs 24 hours to solve the investigation. Meanwhile, the secret identity of Mr. Tojamura is revealed to Ben, only after he signs over the mill and Ghostwood estates. Seeking the connection between the magical boy and Harold Smith's suicide note, Donna visits Mrs. Tremond's house with Agent Cooper and Andy. She receives an envelope with a page from Laura's secret diary that reveals Laura and Cooper had the same dream. Cooper then stages a confrontation at the Roadhouse with suspect Ben and the help of Ed and Hawk. Truman brings Leland, Bobby brings Leo, and Major Briggs arrives unexpectedly with the old waiter. As his visions become clearer, Cooper remembers Laura's message from his dream and the Giant gives him back his ring. The final chaotic conclusion at the Sheriff's office officially answers the question of who killed Laura Palmer.

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Air date: Dec 8, 1990

Episode 17 of Twin Peaks, "Dispute Between Brothers" originally aired on December 8, 1990, and was directed by Tina Rathborne. Taking place the day of Leland's wake, Agent Cooper reluctantly prepares to leave Twin Peaks. As he is saying goodbye to the crew at the Sheriff's office, Special Agent Roger Hardy (Clarence Williams III) and a Canadian Mountie (Gavan O'Herlihy) arrive with the announcement that Cooper has been suspended from the FBI. Meanwhile, the 35-year-old Nadine Hurley (Wendy Robie) still believes she is a teenager, so Dr. Jacoby and Ed try to get her enrolled at Twin Peaks High School. At One-Eyed Jacks, Jean Renault plots with Ernie and Hank in a scheme against Cooper. At the Double R diner, Norma discovers the identity of food critic M.T. Wentz and kicks her mother out of the restaurant. That evening during the full moon, Cooper has a campfire with Major Briggs, who makes the first reference to the White Lodge.

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Twin Peaks: Season 2 Photos

Tv Season Info

In Series 2 the town comes to terms with the aftermath at the hotel and the murder investigation continues.

Cast & Crew

Kyle MacLachlan
Special Agent Dale Cooper
Peggy Lipton
Norma Jennings
Sherilyn Fenn
Audrey Horne
Warren Frost
Dr. Will Hayward
Joan Chen
Jocelyn Packard
Kimmy Robertson
Lucy Moran
Richard Beymer
Benjamin Horne
Everett McGill
Big Ed Hurley
Dana Ashbrook
Bobby Briggs
Lara Flynn Boyle
Donna Hayward
James Marshall
James Hurley
Mädchen Amick
Shelly Johnson
Michael Ontkean
Sheriff Harry S. Truman
Jack Nance
Pete Martell
Michael Horse
Deputy Tommy "Hawk" Hill
Piper Laurie
Mr. Tojamura
Harry Goaz
Deputy Andy Brennan
Wendy Robie
Nadine Hurley
Eric DaRe
Leo Johnson (archive footage)
Don Davis
Maj. Garland Briggs
Mark Frost
Writer (Teleplay)
Uli Edel
Director
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News & Interviews for Twin Peaks: Season 2

Critic Reviews for Twin Peaks Season 2

All Critics (40) | Top Critics (22)

I loved the closing shot of the owl and the fact that the show was true to and enhanced its own internal mythology, and I thought Ray Wise's performance was positively superb.

Jan 26, 2021 | Full Review…

This isn't mystery, this is manipulation. I think Lynch and friends ran out of story last spring and are making it up as they go along.

Jan 26, 2021 | Full Review…

The cold truth is that Twin Peaks has been and remains a thousand gimmicks in search of a story. Or, to use the sort of food image favored by creator David Lynch, it's like a table with a thousand seasonings and no meal.

Jan 26, 2021 | Full Review…

Is it possible this was the same series I was such a big fan of last season? It was all too obvious to me creators David Lynch and Mark Forst were having problems stretching the story and used every trick in the book.

Jan 26, 2021 | Full Review…

Twin Peaks can take forever to solve Laura's murder... and at this rate, it probably will. But it can't move like a tired glacier the way Sunday's [premiere] did, lingering forever on boring scenes with no payoff.

Jan 26, 2021 | Full Review…

There doesn't seem to be much beyond the characters' quirks except more quirks. The fascination the series holds is largely a function of the little shocks it can deliver. But how many times can Audrey Horn tie a knot in a cherry stem with her tongue?

Jan 26, 2021 | Full Review…

The idiosyncratic fare aside, the excellent ensemble cast and the willingness to challenge TV conventions were Twin Peaks' undisputed accomplishments.

Jan 27, 2021 | Full Review…

Alas, on Sunday night's season premiere the show's creators, Mark Frost and David Lynch, sent Twin Peaks careening over the cliff and rolling down those snow-covered mountains to a crashing thud.

Jan 26, 2021 | Full Review…

If one insists on placing this into a genre, forget post-modernist soap. Twin Peaks is the televisual equivalent of Marquez or Isabel Allende: magic realism. Magic in all senses.

Jan 26, 2021 | Full Review…

I suspect the surreal show didn't win any new puzzled fans and lost some disappointed old ones.

Jan 26, 2021 | Full Review…

"Who killed Laura Palmer" was the most uninteresting plot question since "Who will Rocky Balboa fight in Rocky IV?" I never cared... Stretching the answer out until last week, therefore, was about as annoying as series television gets.

Jan 26, 2021 | Full Review…

Twin Peaks became a fad last year and the show's complex nature made sure it was a fad born to quickly fade. Fads need quick, easy resolutions and simple characters and ideas; Twin Peaks actually got better and more complicated this year.

Jan 26, 2021 | Full Review…

Audience Reviews for Twin Peaks: Season 2

  • Feb 08, 2021
    All right, I was caught off guard on this one, I had no background or knowledge of all the events and cult following phenomenon behind this show, and there's a lot to tell about Twin Peaks. I am not sure how to divide this review properly so I'll start by addressing the fact that this will be for the first 2 seasons of Twin Peaks, and the third season (that came out 26 years later in 2017) will get a review of its own. Also this was my first exposure to David Lynch, so cut me some slack in getting use to his approach of cinema and television. The premise of the show seems very simple, a high school girl is murdered under very disturbing circumstances, so everyone is eager to understand what happened, who did this? And this is where agent Copper (played amazingly by Kyle MacLachlan) enters the picture, an FBI agent sent to the small town of Twin Peaks, where the murder occurred and his journey to unveil this strange mystery with the help of local police. The show didn't hook me from the start, it was a slow burner, and with all the amazing crime mystery genre content that has been going around these days (yes I am looking at you season 1 of True Detective) I didn't find the story that interesting in the beginning. Sure there are a lot of quirky characters and innovative direction going on, yet not enough for me to care, at least at the start. Somehow as the series progresses these characters who I might say are the heart of the show, start to grow on you, and also not less important, the atmosphere around this small town has an hypnotic attraction to it, with the help of the soundtrack and the unconventional style of David Lynch, it becomes more and more engaging as the story unfolds. So for the standard of the 90s this was some groundbreaking television series that set the tone for nowadays approach for the best TV series, and in that regard it has my absolute respect. It seems however that in the "backstage", more specifically on the production of the series, a lot of things were happening, apparently there was a constant "fight" between Lynch and ABC (the channel where the series were being broadcast), and since Lynch has such a unique approach to the movie industry apparently his ideas didn't go well with the people on ABC, so a lot of his creativity was blocked. Some of the most crucial demands were for instance, Lynch didn't want to reveal the murder, but the channel put pressure in avoiding this (personally I wouldn't have liked an unsolved mystery, no matter what people say I hate those types of scripts, the ones where you "leave it to the imagination of the viewer" sound simply lazy). Another issue was that apparently once the murder was revealed, Lynch distanced himself from the project and audiences dropped dramatically. Here's my humble opinion, once again it's a slow burner that becomes more interesting, under the described circumstances, the events leading to the unveil of the murderer got me more hooked, and contrary to what is popular opinion, the last half of the second season was actually very enjoyable, sure it seemed a bit like "filler" and focusing majorly on the sub-plots, however for me even with the disclosure of the murderer there were clear questions to be answered and I wasn't satisfied so I wanted to see more and to know what exactly are we dealing with here? (minor spoilers) Is Bob and the remaining "spirits" a metaphor to our own inner demons, is it actually a supernatural occurrence within the show script...? I mean this is the part of the show that frustrated me, David returned to direct the last episode, and it was a mess - let me clarify, it was for sure unexpected and weirder than anything I've seen, and a complete shift in tone on the show - but that wasn't what bothered me, it could've been actually interesting, but what I found frustrating was the fact that, there's still no clear explanation to my previous question, or at least a hint, is this a metaphor, is there any meaning, is it a simple horror story...? Because to me the last episode seems to have been surreal just for the sake of being surreal, it seems it was done "just for fun" nothing pleasant about wrapping up the story... And I see a lot of "that's Lynch signature" reviews, well for me it doesn't work, even if you have a weid or surreal approach to something it should convey some sort of meaning unless the entire show was a surreal experiment, which it wasn't - still a very good show for the time it was written and I probably wouldn't have given such high rate if I didn't know that a third season is already finished with some possible answers (this was canceled back in the 90s).
  • Nov 18, 2020
    The story continues after season 1's cliffhanger to end with an ever bigger cliffhanger, too big to be halted for 25 years, to be honest. This is one of my bigger problems with this season, along with the subplots hell that tarnishes the middle episodes. After a great start that peaks with the demise of Laura's murderer, it's a mess of pointless filler stories. Only at the end of the season it all gets back on track tying back to the main plot with a spectacular, even if inconclusive, ending. All the other elements that worked in the first season are there: unpredictability of the genre (drama/comedy/mistery/thriller/horror/sci-fi/soap/romance/nonsense...), memorable soundtrack (God bless Badalamenti), quirky characters, and countless cups of joe.
  • Jun 28, 2020
    Very very disappointing
  • May 23, 2020
    It starts amazing, then it's 70% bullshit, but the finale is probably the best episode of the whole series, and totally worth it.
  • May 02, 2020
    Seasonal affective disorder doesn't have to be that long!
  • Apr 29, 2020
    Definitely much messier and more puzzling than the first season, a little too much so for its own good. It's still an interesting albeit very strange season of television that was arguably more daring and unconventional than the prior, but after the reveal of Laura's killer the remainder genuinely feels like they didn't really know what to do or what direction to take for the next 13 or so episodes so they just tried to juggle as many subplots and add more characters as possible, even adding in a cartoonishly-evil antagonist that at times came off way too silly and campy, even for Twin Peaks. Still, despite all this Lynch and Mark Frost managed to keep the show investing throughout, and even today it still stands as a landmark and innovative piece of prime time television. Offbeat, certainly strange but also charming and kind of wonderful in its own way.
  • Jan 14, 2020
    I could never understand why Critics & Fans talked so much trash about Season 2 of Twin Peaks. Season 2, has by far some of the best moments, in the whole Series. The Supernatural/Horror elements that David Lynch & Mark Frost brought into Season 2, are outstanding, and made Twin Peaks a billion times more exciting, then Season 1, in my opinion (Even though I still loved Season 1)... BOB is an absolute maniac! ... Even though he looks human, the actor that played him, Frank Silva (R.I.P.) was terrifying. He put on an incredible performance. The Giant/The Fireman was a very interesting, haunting, yet insightful character as well... The Season Finale of Season 2, will always be my favorite Twin Peaks episode of all time. It descends into complete madness, and I loved every minute of it. I would give Season 2 & Season 3 of Twin Peaks a 1000% rating out of 100 if I could. By far my #1 favorite pieces of Cinema of all time.
  • Jan 12, 2020
    David Lynch's Twin Peaks: Season 2 is still engaging and fun but midway looses steam.
  • Dec 05, 2019
    Season 2: Well due to the ratings and cult status this show attained I was expecting s2 to be much better than s1... but it was the complete opposite. The supernatural stuff and the mysteries were a definite positive. But the cheesy comedy and random absurdity re plot developments were terrible. This was a huge undertaking to get through 29 episodes and I definitely regret it. It was something I had to do if I wanted to hang onto my membership in the Lynch Fan Club. This is a show that (I realized too late) was not about plot development and answering of questions... it felt like it was being absurd simply to test the audience's patience. Or more likely than not, this just wasn't made for me. So I'll hold off on warning viewers against, bc the cult following is HUGE and I am but 1 poor soul. The whole goal of this was to be able to watch Fire Walk With Me so I pray that that salvages this ride I'm on called Twin Peaks.
  • Oct 27, 2019
    The highlights are still there but useless subplots and whims of the production almost ruined the beauty of the series, luckily actors and creators have maneged to preserve their work

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