Daniel Barnes Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Daniel Barnes

Daniel Barnes
Daniel Barnes's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): Sacramento News & Review

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
2/5 88% Blade Runner 2049 (2017) Director Denis Villeneuve is the modern master of empty, thundering portent, and the dystopic future cinematic universe of Blade Runner gives him a gigantic space to practice his darkly didactic arts.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Oct 19, 2017
2/5 59% The Foreigner (2017) Chan spends most of the second half of the film off-screen, so Brosnan emerges as the true lead of The Foreigner, anchoring a cluttered plot that serves the usual pro-torture, pro-surveillance, anti-rights and anti-woman agendas. ‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Oct 19, 2017
3/5 82% Marshall (2017) The courtroom aspect feels conventional and the film lacks real insight, but it's professionally handled and Boseman does solid work.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Oct 19, 2017
4/5 93% The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected) (2017) It's not as cohesive (or corrosive) as Baumbach's best work, but even in second gear no one depicts the tender malice of family better, and the film offers a powerful reminder that Sandler and Stiller are otherwise wasting their careers on crap.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Oct 19, 2017
5/5 97% The Florida Project (2017) The world of The Florida Project feels tangible, lyrical, forbidding and magical all at once, a boundaryless playground for kids and a quicksand prison for everyone else.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Oct 19, 2017
3/5 87% Professor Marston & The Wonder Women (2017) Hall and Heathcoate both do strong work.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Oct 19, 2017
2/5 67% Victoria & Abdul (2017) It's sort of like Driving Miss Daisy, only way more racist. ‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Oct 5, 2017
2/5 84% Battle of the Sexes (2017) Steve Carell plays the loudmouth hustler Riggs as exactly the one-note, surface-level caricature you would expect, and the film veers chaotically from googly-eyed comedy to sincere drama as a result. ‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Sep 28, 2017
4/5 69% mother! (2017) This is about as self-contained as a movie can get, but it's also a stupendously tense, disturbing and powerful piece of filmmaking, with Aronofsky in full command even as the world seems to spin off its axis in the final half hour. ‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Sep 28, 2017
3/5 100% Dolores (2017) This is more a monument than a movie.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Sep 28, 2017
2/5 85% It (2017) Muschietti single-mindedly lurches from monotonous clown demon jump-scare sequence to monotonous clown demon jump-scare sequence, lazily relying on ear-splitting soundtrack spikes to provide most of the "horror."‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Sep 22, 2017
2/5 93% Gook (2017) The cacophonous result comes a lot closer to recapturing the spirit of Crash than to recapturing the spirit of 1990s independent cinema.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Sep 14, 2017
3/5 83% Patti Cake$ (2017) A strong rooting interest carries us through when the film's integrity starts to crumble.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Sep 7, 2017
1/5 30% I Do... Until I Don't (2017) Right down to that insipid, cutesy-poo title, I Do...Until I Don't plays like a succession of bullet-point clichés about love and sex and marriage that no one ever bothered to develop, connect together or base in any kind of reality.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Sep 7, 2017
3/5 96% Menashe (2017) The Yiddish-language Menashe wants to highlight the universality of thorny family dynamics, but it's better at highlighting the universality of drearily well-intentioned Sundance drama clichés.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Aug 25, 2017
5/5 89% Good Time (2017) Good Time matches the do-anything relentlessness of its lead character, making for one of the most visceral and exciting movie experiences of the year.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Aug 25, 2017
4/5 87% Wind River (2017) Wind River builds slowly, and a little of Sheridan's klutzy predator-prey symbolism goes a long way, but he also shows a genuine knack for steadily building tension, finally allowing it to explode in an excellent final act.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Aug 25, 2017
4/5 95% Step (2017) The strength of these girls is inspiring.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Aug 17, 2017
3/5 98% In This Corner of the World (Kono sekai no katasumi ni) (2017) Fascinating and frustrating in equal measures, In This Corner of the World offers a compelling look at life in Japan during and directly after wartime, with a rich female character at the center, but it's also maddeningly choppy.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Aug 17, 2017
4/5 82% Detroit (2017) The final movement of Detroit feels more like the work of an awards-grubber, and exposes [Bigelow's] general awkwardness with warmth.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Aug 11, 2017
2/5 78% An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth To Power (2017) Gore acknowledges early on that there is an unbridgeable ideological divide with climate change deniers, so An Inconvenient Sequel amounts to a monotonous minister preaching to a bored choir.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Aug 11, 2017
3/5 76% Atomic Blonde (2017) Theron makes for an extremely compelling kung fu cipher, and there is one extended action scene set in an apartment building that almost justifies the entire endeavor.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Aug 10, 2017
3/5 76% 13 Minutes (Elser) (2017) Back in [Hirschbiegel's] element, he delivers a sturdy but routine biopic, one that works best as a political radicalization process film.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Aug 10, 2017
3/5 74% Landline (2017) It's impossible for me to dislike a film that relies so heavily on 1990s alternative rock to set the mood, but it's also impossible to deny that Robespierre once again falters in the finish. ‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Aug 10, 2017
4/5 92% Dunkirk (2017) A fingernail-obliterating cinema experience.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Jul 28, 2017
93% Our Little Sister (Umimachi Diary) (2016) Emotional without getting sentimental, Our Little Sister is the sort of "coming to terms" therapy narrative that should be drooling claptrap, but Koreeda and his actresses make it seem honest and authentic.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Jul 18, 2017
94% Miss Hokusai (Sarusuberi: Miss Hokusai) (2016) Miss Hokusai mostly gets by on atmosphere, but it's a fantastic example of the wide variety found in Japanese animation.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Jul 18, 2017
100% Harmonium (Fuchi ni tatsu) (2017) Harmonium is a borderline-unbearable bummer, but it's also quietly captivating, with evocative framing and excellent performances.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Jul 18, 2017
3/5 98% The Big Sick (2017) At 119 minutes long, it may be too much of a good thing-I have rarely been so aggravated by such a funny and heartwarming film. ‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Jul 13, 2017
3/5 93% War for the Planet of the Apes (2017) The special effects are amazing, and the long takes and measured pace give War the flavor of an old-school impossible-mission epic, but there's something sociopathic about the way the film portrays the eradication of humanity as heroic.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Jul 13, 2017
4/5 86% Okja (2017) Offers more high-energy genre subversion from South Korean writer-director Bong Joon Ho, who this time uses a Spielberg-ian children's fantasy template to bluntly satirize issues related to animal rights, environmental destruction and corporate greed.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Jun 30, 2017
3/5 95% The Women's Balcony (Ismach Hatani) (2017) [It] might have worked better as a 10- to 13-hour season of television, but what Ben-Shimon and screenwriter Shlomit Nehama crammed into this 96-minute feature is still an astute and often quite funny piece of filmmaking.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Jun 29, 2017
2/5 16% The Mummy (2017) Remember the scene in Dawn of Justice where Batman sends Wonder Woman an email explaining the plot of the next film? That's the entire second act here.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Jun 16, 2017
1/5 21% The Book of Henry (2017) At last, after The Lovely Bones and Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, we receive the third part in a reprehensible triple feature of revoltingly smarmy and overstylized tragedies about precocious children and grief.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Jun 16, 2017
3/5 77% Beatriz at Dinner (2017) Beatriz at Dinner, while smart, observant and well-acted, is an almost excessively minor culture clash drama. ‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Jun 16, 2017
2/5 29% Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales (2017) In its ability to spin mindless fun into heavy-handed bombast, the Pirates franchise is matched only by the Transformers films, and Dead Men Tell No Tales doesn't have the guts to be an exception.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Jun 8, 2017
2/5 86% The Wedding Plan (2017) The Wedding Plan is intimate and occasionally fascinating, but as an entertainment it's trite and frequently sleep-inducing.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Jun 8, 2017
4/5 87% Captain Underpants: The First Epic Movie (Captain Underpants) (2017) Captain Underpants bursts with anarchic energy, and I still laugh out loud when I remember the villain voiced by Nick Kroll revealing his full name as Professor P. P. Diahrreastein Poopypants.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Jun 8, 2017
3/5 67% The Wall (2017) Compact, blunt and borderline exploitative, Doug Liman's lean military thriller The Wall largely plays like a Max Fischer stage adaptation of American Sniper.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted May 18, 2017
3/5 84% The Lovers (2017) It's great to see a showcase role for the always underused Winger.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted May 18, 2017
3/5 51% The Dinner (2017) The film is much more interesting in its amuse-bouche diversions, including a surreal and emotional trip to the battlefield at Gettysburg.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted May 4, 2017
5/5 97% Your Name. (Kimi No Na Wa.) (2017) It's the rare work of art that can base an extraordinarily powerful moment of emotional catharsis on compulsive boob-squeezing, but that's the miracle of this movie.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Apr 21, 2017
4/5 66% Free Fire (2017) The hard-boiled, insult-comic dialogue might sometimes lean a little closer to Guy Ritchie than Quentin Tarantino, but the energy and momentum are undeniable-the film has a way of relentlessly slicing forward every time you expect it to stagnate. ‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Apr 21, 2017
2/5 71% Beauty and the Beast (2017) It's a high-gloss recycle job, designed to do nothing more than massage your nostalgia sensors for two interminable hours.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Mar 24, 2017
4/5 98% Kedi (2017) The film runs only 80 minutes, but I could have watched a version at least three times as long. ‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Mar 17, 2017
4/5 99% Get Out (2017) Making his directorial debut, Peele manages to continually pique our interest, even when we know where the story is heading.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Mar 9, 2017
4/5 92% Toni Erdmann (2016) Toni Erdmann is so loaded with show-stopping sequences and contradictory tones that it's hard to know where to start, but I doubt anyone will ever listen to "The Greatest Love of All" again without thinking of this film. D.B.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Mar 9, 2017
4/5 89% John Wick: Chapter 2 (2017) Director Chad Stahelski and writer Derek Kolstad reteam with star Keanu Reeves for John Wick: Chapter 2, a surprisingly necessary sequel to their left-field 2014 action success.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Mar 2, 2017
1/5 13% Bitter Harvest (2017) It seems like Mendeluk and his writer Richard Bachynsky Hoover were striving for something sweeping and old-fashioned, but the end result is claustrophobic and comically out-of-touch.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Mar 2, 2017
4/5 94% The Red Turtle (La tortue rouge) (2017) It's about as beautifully simple and lithe as an epic visual feast can get, with Ghibli-esque themes about our spiritual connection to nature kept high in the mix, and an overarching bittersweetness that keeps the fantasy grounded in human emotion.‐ Sacramento News & Review
Read More | Posted Feb 24, 2017