Donald McLean

Donald McLean
Donald McLean's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer® when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): Bay Area Reporter
Publications: Bay Area Reporter

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
73% Salò o le 120 giornate di Sodoma (Salò, or the 120 Days of Sodom) (1979) It makes its point about Fascism, and Pasolini's artistic sense is obvious in every frame, but the film becomes an endurance contest to see if you can make it to the bitter end without vomiting. - Bay Area Reporter EDIT
Read More | Posted May 28, 2020
100% Word Is Out: Stories of Some of Our Lives (1977) It should be required viewing for everyone who seeks a better understanding. It is a film long overdue whose time has come. - Bay Area Reporter EDIT
Read More | Posted May 28, 2020
64% The Turning Point (1977) The role of Deedee gives Shirley MacLaine her best role in many a year and she is superb. Anne Bancroft as Emma is stunning, and when the two women team up for a 7-minute confrontation scene, the screen almost shoots sparks. - Bay Area Reporter EDIT
Read More | Posted May 28, 2020
67% The Adventure of Sherlock Holmes' Smarter Brother (1975) The good far outweighs the bad. - Bay Area Reporter EDIT
Read More | Posted May 21, 2020
36% The Hindenburg (1975) The Hindenburg gives us the most realistic and dramatic of any disaster film yet. - Bay Area Reporter EDIT
Read More | Posted May 21, 2020
No Score Yet Winterhawk (1975) Michael Dante gets the break of his career with the role of Winterhawk, a proud, fair man faced with great responsibility. - Bay Area Reporter EDIT
Read More | Posted May 21, 2020
71% The Front (1976) Funny as only Allen can be, the script by Walter Bernstein and the direction by Martin Ritt delve far deeper and give us a penetrating look via black comedy at a time of mass hysteria. - Bay Area Reporter EDIT
Read More | Posted May 21, 2020
63% A Matter of Time (1976) An embarrassment for all concerned. - Bay Area Reporter EDIT
Read More | Posted May 21, 2020
83% Bugsy Malone (1976) This film is the brainchild of writer/director Alan Parker, and it's amazing that he's pulled it off successfully. - Bay Area Reporter EDIT
Read More | Posted May 21, 2020
79% The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975) For the most part it moves spiritedly along and the whole thing is a giant giggle. It's all so blatantly outrageous it can only be taken in the spirit of campy fun; this is one time a stage production has been enhanced by the film version. - Bay Area Reporter EDIT
Read More | Posted May 21, 2020
No Score Yet W.c. Fields And Me (1976) Those problems aside [W.C. Fields and Me] offers a hilarious script by Bob Merrill filled with Field's biting, caustic humor, including all those memorable incidents he is noted for. - Bay Area Reporter EDIT
Read More | Posted May 12, 2020
93% All the President's Men (1976) As grippingly suspenseful as any James Bond thriller, and it's all true. - Bay Area Reporter EDIT
Read More | Posted May 12, 2020
92% Family Plot (1976) If Family Plot is not the perfectly structured film, it remains a gem from the master of wry suspense. - Bay Area Reporter EDIT
Read More | Posted May 12, 2020
90% Murder on the Orient Express (1974) The secret of this film is style. - Bay Area Reporter EDIT
Read More | Posted May 11, 2020
75% The Gauntlet (1977) The Eastwood formula is predictable but fun; thin plot, lots of action and heroic stoicism above all. - Bay Area Reporter EDIT
Read More | Posted May 6, 2020
40% Telefon (1977) In Telefon, Bronson has forsaken his Death Wish image of gratuitous violence and offers one of his most interesting and deftly thought out performances to date under Don Siegel's crisply honed direction. - Bay Area Reporter EDIT
Read More | Posted May 6, 2020
15% The World's Greatest Lover (1977) This soggy excuse for a comedy looks like an old Sid Caesar Show of Shows sketch elongated interminably; there's about ten minutes of funny material to work with, then it falls right on its mugging, leering face. - Bay Area Reporter EDIT
Read More | Posted May 6, 2020
82% Saturday Night Fever (1977) John Travolta is far better than any previous exposure would indicate; his Tony Manero is suitably tough and punkish, but there is also a warmth and vulnerability that make him very appealing. - Bay Area Reporter EDIT
Read More | Posted May 6, 2020
95% Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977) Despite these flaws, it's a gripping film that touches a nerve because who's to say it couldn't all actually happen tomorrow. - Bay Area Reporter EDIT
Read More | Posted May 6, 2020
67% Sinbad and the Eye of the Tiger (1977) It's lightweight entertainment but enjoyable. - Bay Area Reporter EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 30, 2020
57% Rollercoaster (1977) It's a downhill ride all the way. - Bay Area Reporter EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 30, 2020
92% Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope (1977) Written and directed magnificently by George Lucas, the cast is excellent... but it is Chewbacca and the two robots who walk off with the acting honors. (Don't ask me what a Wookie is, go see the movie!) - Bay Area Reporter EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 30, 2020
22% The Serpent's Egg (1978) Bergman's worst film. - Bay Area Reporter EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 24, 2019
No Score Yet The Best Way to Walk (La meilleure façon de marcher) (1978) The Best Way is an excellent first outing for a talented young director. - Bay Area Reporter EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 24, 2019
No Score Yet The Betsy (1978) The Betsy had the audience convulsed. The only problem is, it's not supposed to be a comedy. It Just turned out that way. - Bay Area Reporter EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 24, 2019
75% The Fury (1978) Carrie it ain't, but Carrie had .a good suspense-mounting plot; The Fury just assaults you scene after scene without getting Peckinpah gory. - Bay Area Reporter EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 24, 2019
20% A Little Night Music (1977) Harold Prince has mounted a beautifully stylized production of Sondheim's study of the follies of love. - Bay Area Reporter EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 24, 2019
63% Gray Lady Down (1978) It still holds some degree of excitement for fans of the "disaster" genre. - Bay Area Reporter EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 24, 2019
No Score Yet The Evil (1978) The Evil certainly is. - Bay Area Reporter EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 24, 2019
100% Blue Collar (1978) It is a powerful film, with raunchy humor whose message is subtly steady but never heavy-handed. - Bay Area Reporter EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 24, 2019
44% The Choirboys (1977) The actors are all fine talents who probably thought they'd be making the novel; poor idealistic dreamers. Don't they know what Hollywood does to good books? - Bay Area Reporter EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 24, 2019
84% The Goodbye Girl (1977) Richard Dreyfuss gives the best performance of his career thus far; it's being touted for an Oscar and rightfully so. Marsha Mason is equally fine in a less flashy role, and the two strike wonderful sparks together. - Bay Area Reporter EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 24, 2019
No Score Yet Murph the Surf (1975) Better than you might think. - Bay Area Reporter EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 24, 2019
26% Mandingo (1975) It would all be offensive if it weren't so laughable. - Bay Area Reporter EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 24, 2019
88% Professione: reporter (The Passenger) (1975) Michelangelo Antonioni's new film The Passenger is a visual masterpiece, frame for frame one of the most beautifully realized films in years. - Bay Area Reporter EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 24, 2019
67% The Stepford Wives (1975) Ira Levin's novel furnished the interesting futuristic theory of cybernetics, but William Goldman's screenplay is as mundane as Bryan Forbe's direction. - Bay Area Reporter EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 24, 2019
4/4 88% Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore (1974) Once in a very great while comes along a film that is so perfectly made a critic throws pad and pencil to the wind and tends to find himself frothing with glee and writing things like "One of the year's best" and "Not to be missed!" - Bay Area Reporter EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 24, 2019