Siddhant Adlakha

Siddhant Adlakha
Tomatometer-approved critic

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
89% 1917 (2020) In a purely technical sense, 1917 achieves exactly what it sets out to do. But in the process, it loses the relationship between images and cinema's ability to create meaning beneath the surface. - Polygon EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 27, 2020
95% Marriage Story (2019) Baumbach allows us to get to know the couple better than they know themselves - that is, we get to know them through each other's eyes, as they expose those parts of themselves they haven't yet come to terms with. - Firstpost EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 6, 2020
80% Family Romance, LLC (2019) By leaning-in to digital artifice, Herzog searches constantly for the nuggets of truth nestled between constructed lies, ultimately finding the bitter loneliness between moments of performative façade. - Firstpost EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 6, 2020
90% Capernaum (Capharnaüm) (2018) A tough-to-watch neorealist drama from Nadine Labaki, Capharnaüm (or Chaos) captures the nascent fury of twelve-year-old Zain (a brave performance by Zain Al Rafeea), a Beirut slumdweller suing his parents for giving birth to him - Firstpost EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 6, 2020
98% The Farewell (2019) The Farewell is certainly dialogue-heavy, but it captures the Wang family dynamic through blocking and movement, as Billi both stands out as a westerner in her former homeland, and gets caught up in the sweep of family rituals and idiosyncrasies. - Firstpost EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 6, 2020
No Score Yet The Fall (2019) Clocking in at a mere six minutes, The Fall is a gut-churning short that mirrors our phantasmagorical political moment. - Firstpost EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 6, 2020
No Score Yet To Let (2019) The film lingers on details and spaces, exploring the fundamental question of what "home" even means, in a world where the physical is temporary. - The Juggernaut EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 19, 2019
100% Sairat (2016) Manjule earns the film's three-hour runtime, exploring both the harsh stresses of romance on-the-run and the unrelenting specter of caste violence, which looms over even the most romantic of scenes. - The Juggernaut EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 19, 2019
98% Court (2015) An incisive upending of the nexus between legalese and tradition, Chaitanya Tamhane's authentic judicial drama gets into the cogs of India's censorship laws and their overlap with India's broken courts (and the people who keep them broken). - The Juggernaut EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 19, 2019
97% The Lunchbox (2014) A bittersweet story of moving on, of memory and nostalgia, and of familiar songs, smells and sensations that ground us, and remind us of who we once were. - The Juggernaut EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 19, 2019
100% Ship Of Theseus (2012) It's a dialogue-heavy film, one where opposing ideologies come into contact in a multitude of tongues, but it's one where writer-director Gandhi and cinematographer Pankaj Kumar turn each widescreen frame into thought-provoking tableaus. - The Juggernaut EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 19, 2019
No Score Yet Chitrangada (2012) Every shot is staged like a Renaissance painting; bodies move and dance together, even in stillness, turning the anxious, oppressive energy of dysphoria into liberating spiritual passion. A tender work of abstraction from one of India's queer icons. - The Juggernaut EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 19, 2019
No Score Yet Anhey gorhey da daan (Alms for a Blind Horse) (2011) A portrait of what poverty, and the accompanying specter of death, can do to a human being. - The Juggernaut EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 19, 2019
No Score Yet Udaan (2010) It plays, at times, like a spiritual successor to François Truffaut's The 400 Blows, though it quietly paves its own path, rooting its story in the tensions between Indian tradition and Indian youth yearning to fly free. - The Juggernaut EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 19, 2019
94% Avengers: Endgame (2019) While the supporting cast members often feel like benched players, the remaining Avengers' arcs do, for the most part, pay off the stories the set up by the film's first hour. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 15, 2019
78% Captain Marvel (2019) After all, Captain Marvel is a Marvel Studios film with significant ties to the U.S. military. While it's nominally critical of war, its hands are filthy with government propaganda. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 15, 2019
88% Ant-Man and the Wasp (2018) Marvel Studios rarely goes all-on on dramatizing its themes; the series' priority is entertainment above all else, including meaning. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 15, 2019
85% Avengers: Infinity War (2018) This unprecedented crossover event could not have succeeded, or even existed, without a decade of narrative investment. The film takes full advantage of this - albeit to mixed results. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 15, 2019
97% Black Panther (2018) The film takes structural whiteness to task, but quietly, implicitly, and far off-screen. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 15, 2019
93% Thor: Ragnarok (2017) Thor changing his entire outlook on his kingdom isn't nearly as dramatically challenging as it ought to be. However, the film manages to stay afloat throughout, owing to a wildly refreshing comedic sensibility. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 15, 2019
92% Spider-Man: Homecoming (2017) How much weight can the resolution really hold for Parker, when all it does is fall back on Marvel's original sin of affirming the status quo? It can't help but feel like a really good Tony Stark story nestled between incomplete Spidey adventures. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 15, 2019
85% Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (2017) It may very well be Marvel's most mature film, zeroing in on the emotional complexities of abuse carried forward into adulthood - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 15, 2019
89% Doctor Strange (2016) Despite the film's white western gaze towards some of its characters, it's not only aesthetically alluring, but employs eastern philosophies like Buddhism and Taoism to build its narrative framework - a far cry from the way most Hollywood stories are told - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 15, 2019
91% Captain America: Civil War (2016) In prior films, Steve Rogers was never given a clear ideological enemy. Here, as if to finally course-correct this omission, the series uses his divestment from ideology as a dramatic question: who does Captain America truly fight for? - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 15, 2019
83% Ant-Man (2015) Paul Rudd brings a boyish charm to any role he plays. His "Aw, shucks!" demeanor is perfect for the film's version of Scott Lang, though this iteration of the character is also trapped in a story that can't decide what it wants him to be. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 15, 2019
75% Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015) Avengers: Age of Ultron is a big ol' action beat-'em-up between superheroes and robots. It also uses genre trappings to dramatize the creation of God and the Devil, in order to tell a story about why we create, and why our stories matter. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 15, 2019
91% Guardians of the Galaxy (2014) The film marked Marvel Studios going full-on Marvel Comics, bringing with it the requisite band of multi-coloured misfits, whose intersecting character arcs - while occasionally incomplete - formed an alluring tapestry. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 15, 2019
90% Captain America: The Winter Soldier (2014) It's more coddling than challenging in any significant way, but it's undoubtedly effective at being "feel-good," for whatever that might be worth. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 15, 2019
66% Thor: The Dark World (2013) Its various subplots are connected not by theme or by character, but by coincidence. It has the appearance of well-structured drama, but it leaves too many elements hanging in mid-air to form a coherent whole. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 15, 2019
79% Iron Man 3 (2013) Ultimately, empty suits fighting anonymous henchmen is still an empty spectacle, and it happens to be at odds with Stark's journey in the film. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 15, 2019
91% Marvel's The Avengers (2012) The Avengers is as close as you can get to a quintessential blockbuster experience. One of the rare MCU films where the action beats feel entirely like extensions of story and character. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 15, 2019
80% Captain America: The First Avenger (2011) While Steve Rogers, the man in isolation, is a beacon of goodness, Captain America, the symbol within a larger narrative context, falls victim to Marvel's penchant for diluted ideology. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 15, 2019
77% Thor (2011) Marvel's reluctance to entertain the notion of confronting military conquest works to its narrative detriment. The heroes aren't allowed to truly change, because they're never made to face the parts of themselves most connected to the world around them. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 15, 2019
73% Iron Man 2 (2010) Like Iron Man before it, the film's military funding doesn't just result in a wrongheaded political outlook, but in a confused character-story. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 15, 2019
67% The Incredible Hulk (2008) The film is at its most interesting in the brief moments when it ceases to feel like a "superhero movie." But these moments - when the drama is purely human, divorced from the half-formed shared universe backdrop - are few and far between. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 15, 2019
94% Iron Man (2008) Marvel's questions of intervention are locked within an invisible framework, one that allows for lip-service to questioning power, yet one that implicitly comes down on the side of power itself, forever protecting the American status quo. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 15, 2019
91% Star Wars: The Last Jedi (2017) The future of the Force, it would seem, lies in the ending of suffering, rather than in answering the call to violence; or, as Rose puts it, "Not fighting what we hate. Saving what we love." - Polygon EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 13, 2019
93% Honey Boy (2019) A fascinating therapeutic experiment, in which Shia LaBeouf gives his demons familiar form, while finding ways to forgive them. - Firstpost EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 25, 2019
26% Gemini Man (2019) An aesthetic that brings all points of the frame into focus at once, regardless of the lens or shot in question, makes little sense when so much of the story is told from the perspective of an expert marksman. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 24, 2019
97% Portrait of a Lady on Fire (Portrait de la jeune fille en feu) (2020) Portrait of a Lady on Fire plays, at first, like a song with missed notes - until eventually, it discovers and carefully re-assembles them, revealing, in its final scene, the music of the soul. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 22, 2019
99% Parasite (Gisaengchung) (2019) A deliciously twisted thriller-comedy akin to a home invasion flick, filled to the brim with meaning and dripping with directorial mastery. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 22, 2019
97% Pain and Glory (Dolor y gloria) (2019) Almodóvar captures the intimate feeling of having your wounds and memories repaired by time. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 22, 2019
89% Beanpole (Dylda) (2020) A film that manages to be anti-war through and through by refusing to depict war itself, focusing instead on the ripple effects of its devastation as it permeates society and molds people into their worst possible selves. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 22, 2019
96% Atlantics (2019) Watching Atlantics feels like floating on water. It veers between ferocious anger and soulful calm. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 22, 2019
80% Jojo Rabbit (2019) An incisive, empathetic, intimate portrait of isolation. It's graceful, sweet and strange, and despite its twee exterior, it manages to stare social malaise right in the eye, giving it the kind of dressing-down that doesn't simply preach to the choir. - Firstpost EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 21, 2019
51% Young Ahmed (Le jeune Ahmed) (2020) The film may not have much to say, but it's a riveting watch regardless. - Firstpost EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 19, 2019
86% Synonyms (Synonymes) (2019) Lapid's film straddles the fine line between nationalism and madness. An energetic, pulsating work that's as exciting as it is loopy. - Verve Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 17, 2019
85% Zombi Child (2020) An exploration of the way cultures are bastardized, told in the form of a slow-yet-steady emotional implosion that glows with the warmth of history. - Verve Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 17, 2019
82% The Report (2019) Burns jumps back and forth along a crisscrossed timeline in the aftermath of 9/11, and untangles it through the perspective of Daniel Jones... Driver perfectly captures the mental and emotional toll of wrestling with America's legacy. - Verve Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 17, 2019
No Score Yet The Tree House (Nhà cây) (2019) Regret seems to permeate the entire film; a feeling that capturing and canonizing these intimate traditions is a form of barbarism. Truong appears to wrestle with the long-held wisdom of "show, don't tell" - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 16, 2019