8 1/2 Reviews

  • Oct 18, 2020

    This is perhaps one of the greatest films in the history of the cinema. Fellini seamlessly elides from present reality to the past to dreams to fantasy as he taps the unconscious of the lead character played by his alter-ego, Marcello Mastronanni. Mastoianni's journey in 8 1/2 is not only a visit to his inner mind, but a dive into the collective unconscious. Irony and humor along with anxiety, nostalgia and despair suffuse the film. It is an experience.

    This is perhaps one of the greatest films in the history of the cinema. Fellini seamlessly elides from present reality to the past to dreams to fantasy as he taps the unconscious of the lead character played by his alter-ego, Marcello Mastronanni. Mastoianni's journey in 8 1/2 is not only a visit to his inner mind, but a dive into the collective unconscious. Irony and humor along with anxiety, nostalgia and despair suffuse the film. It is an experience.

  • Sep 13, 2020

    A masterful work. A masterpiece of Italian cinema, which takes cinema to a higher level.

    A masterful work. A masterpiece of Italian cinema, which takes cinema to a higher level.

  • Jun 26, 2020

    Convinced I was going to hate this about half way through but it picked up pace and had some great scenes and ruminations in the second half of the film. Just remained irritated by the hackneyed concept of a film about making a film. I guess it will always appeal to people in the film industry but for me it literally never makes for a good plot. This film is hood in-spite of the plot. Best scene was the harem, certain men will relate to this day dream, a confused mess of mixing all the women in your past to one setting. It can only end ugly and it does ha. Was clever and imaginative.

    Convinced I was going to hate this about half way through but it picked up pace and had some great scenes and ruminations in the second half of the film. Just remained irritated by the hackneyed concept of a film about making a film. I guess it will always appeal to people in the film industry but for me it literally never makes for a good plot. This film is hood in-spite of the plot. Best scene was the harem, certain men will relate to this day dream, a confused mess of mixing all the women in your past to one setting. It can only end ugly and it does ha. Was clever and imaginative.

  • May 24, 2020

    What an overrated movie. I understand that the director took inspiration from his life and anxieties and wanted to present them in this abstract way. But i couldn't empathize with him or follow. There were scenes that everybody was talking at the same time and i just wanted to break my computer to make them shut up.

    What an overrated movie. I understand that the director took inspiration from his life and anxieties and wanted to present them in this abstract way. But i couldn't empathize with him or follow. There were scenes that everybody was talking at the same time and i just wanted to break my computer to make them shut up.

  • May 16, 2020

    Non ho trovato tutta questa eccezionalità. Sarò ignorante, ma mi è sembrato un lungo lamento compiaciuto fellinocentrico. Sullo sfondo, inosservati, gli argomenti sociali. Guido-Fellini sotto il tavolo e blam, via i pensieri e gli impegni. Okay, e quindi? (Visto il 16/05/2020)

    Non ho trovato tutta questa eccezionalità. Sarò ignorante, ma mi è sembrato un lungo lamento compiaciuto fellinocentrico. Sullo sfondo, inosservati, gli argomenti sociali. Guido-Fellini sotto il tavolo e blam, via i pensieri e gli impegni. Okay, e quindi? (Visto il 16/05/2020)

  • Apr 10, 2020

    1. Personal, 2. Surreal, 3. Funny, 4. Brilliant, 5. Influential, 6. Avant-garde, 7. Heartfelt, 8. Unique... and a half.

    1. Personal, 2. Surreal, 3. Funny, 4. Brilliant, 5. Influential, 6. Avant-garde, 7. Heartfelt, 8. Unique... and a half.

  • Apr 06, 2020

    Too narratively distorted and mismanaged to offer the full experience to any viewer. -No Go

    Too narratively distorted and mismanaged to offer the full experience to any viewer. -No Go

  • Mar 21, 2020

    The photography is genius, the rest is the same old straight men fantasy.

    The photography is genius, the rest is the same old straight men fantasy.

  • Feb 29, 2020

    A fascinating study of a flawed, complex character with just enough conventionality to remain familiar but so radically distinct from any of its predecssors to keep its audience enraptured. Revolutionary production brilliantly brought to life by Fellini with his traditional penchant for blending reality and fantasy, one of the few films that completely transcends its era. (5/5)

    A fascinating study of a flawed, complex character with just enough conventionality to remain familiar but so radically distinct from any of its predecssors to keep its audience enraptured. Revolutionary production brilliantly brought to life by Fellini with his traditional penchant for blending reality and fantasy, one of the few films that completely transcends its era. (5/5)

  • Jan 20, 2020

    8½ is a film that tries to shine a light on the crazy and hectic life of a director, particularly when he doesn’t have a proper vision for the film he’s been hired to direct. You could feel the chaotic nature of his existence throughout the film, as people would constantly come up to him for some decision that needed to be made. But the way the story is presented is somewhat surrealistic, as we bounce between things that are really happening, flashbacks of things that happened in the past, and strange visions that only seem to have a loose grounding in any reality. It’s the kind of movie that thrives on odd symbolism, but I was surprised to find that most of it made sense to me. I could understand the mental state of the director that lead to his visions of a harem, or a circus, or whatever odd place the film takes us. If only I liked the director in any way, perhaps I’d find exploring his thoughts more enjoyable. Marcello Mastroianni is a fine actor, and his performance in 8½ is effective. It’s simply a character that is not all that sympathetic as presented. I felt some small degree of pity for him as he faced so many obstacles, and suffered with writer’s block. However, his personal struggles all seemed self-inflicted, and he showed no remorse about his philandering. I’ve always disliked characters who behave that way, and I wonder if there’s some cultural divide on the issue, because it seems that many characters in European films I’ve seen take a much more laissez-faire attitude towards cheating on a spouse. That being said, even if he was the most likable character in history, I still would have struggled with 8½ because it lacks a normal narrative structure. I prefer a more traditional flow to a story, and this film was more interested in the stylized approach. I am willing to admit it was well-made, though, even if it’s not my cup of tea.

    8½ is a film that tries to shine a light on the crazy and hectic life of a director, particularly when he doesn’t have a proper vision for the film he’s been hired to direct. You could feel the chaotic nature of his existence throughout the film, as people would constantly come up to him for some decision that needed to be made. But the way the story is presented is somewhat surrealistic, as we bounce between things that are really happening, flashbacks of things that happened in the past, and strange visions that only seem to have a loose grounding in any reality. It’s the kind of movie that thrives on odd symbolism, but I was surprised to find that most of it made sense to me. I could understand the mental state of the director that lead to his visions of a harem, or a circus, or whatever odd place the film takes us. If only I liked the director in any way, perhaps I’d find exploring his thoughts more enjoyable. Marcello Mastroianni is a fine actor, and his performance in 8½ is effective. It’s simply a character that is not all that sympathetic as presented. I felt some small degree of pity for him as he faced so many obstacles, and suffered with writer’s block. However, his personal struggles all seemed self-inflicted, and he showed no remorse about his philandering. I’ve always disliked characters who behave that way, and I wonder if there’s some cultural divide on the issue, because it seems that many characters in European films I’ve seen take a much more laissez-faire attitude towards cheating on a spouse. That being said, even if he was the most likable character in history, I still would have struggled with 8½ because it lacks a normal narrative structure. I prefer a more traditional flow to a story, and this film was more interested in the stylized approach. I am willing to admit it was well-made, though, even if it’s not my cup of tea.