Anna Karenina Reviews

  • May 04, 2019

    It starts well, very theatrical, but then it becomes long and uncaptivating

    It starts well, very theatrical, but then it becomes long and uncaptivating

  • Mar 18, 2019

    It is an insult to the novel. Lacks in depth, heart, character development...and so much more.

    It is an insult to the novel. Lacks in depth, heart, character development...and so much more.

  • Mar 02, 2019

    Anna Karenina (2012) WEAK adaptation for the screen (and its stage, oddly enough) that barely resembles Tolstoy's amazing novel. Keira Knightly is her usual skeletor self, playing the bitchy role once again, even though Tolstoy's Anna is meant to be a classy, passionate, complex, mature woman in the novel. Here she plays an angst-ridden, insecure, moody woman-child. Keira's jutting jaw, mouth movement, and snaggleteeth with strings of saliva, were often distracting due to the director's choice of close-up shots to capture "school of soap opera" emoting. Funny enough, the Vronsky character (Taylor-Johnson) is quite reminiscent of Gene Wilder, the late comedic actor, from the cult classic film Young Frankenstein (1974). While this film's various late 19th century costumes do not consistently reflect the story's time period (1870) in Russia, they are nonetheless interesting to the eye. However, the unusual style of "stage play within a movie" is the greatest weakness of this film, as it consistently begets distraction when it breaks the viewer's attention by interrupting their suspension of disbelief. -March, 2019

    Anna Karenina (2012) WEAK adaptation for the screen (and its stage, oddly enough) that barely resembles Tolstoy's amazing novel. Keira Knightly is her usual skeletor self, playing the bitchy role once again, even though Tolstoy's Anna is meant to be a classy, passionate, complex, mature woman in the novel. Here she plays an angst-ridden, insecure, moody woman-child. Keira's jutting jaw, mouth movement, and snaggleteeth with strings of saliva, were often distracting due to the director's choice of close-up shots to capture "school of soap opera" emoting. Funny enough, the Vronsky character (Taylor-Johnson) is quite reminiscent of Gene Wilder, the late comedic actor, from the cult classic film Young Frankenstein (1974). While this film's various late 19th century costumes do not consistently reflect the story's time period (1870) in Russia, they are nonetheless interesting to the eye. However, the unusual style of "stage play within a movie" is the greatest weakness of this film, as it consistently begets distraction when it breaks the viewer's attention by interrupting their suspension of disbelief. -March, 2019

  • Jan 12, 2019

    Beautifully crafted movie from a long and boring novel. All credit goes to the director Joe Wright for such a fantastic job. I think Tatiana Samoilova did a better job in the 1967 film than Keira Knightly.

    Beautifully crafted movie from a long and boring novel. All credit goes to the director Joe Wright for such a fantastic job. I think Tatiana Samoilova did a better job in the 1967 film than Keira Knightly.

  • Dec 17, 2018

    Beautifully crafted and choreographed though quite simplified in its cinematic interpretation.

    Beautifully crafted and choreographed though quite simplified in its cinematic interpretation.

  • Nov 04, 2018

    Why can't people just love something beautiful without finding ways to criticize it? It's a wonderful movie. It created a feeling in me and that's why I watch movies.

    Why can't people just love something beautiful without finding ways to criticize it? It's a wonderful movie. It created a feeling in me and that's why I watch movies.

  • Jun 26, 2018

    Very goood....and I don't like romance movies.

    Very goood....and I don't like romance movies.

  • Jun 17, 2018

    Breathtaking. A visual masterpiece.

    Breathtaking. A visual masterpiece.

  • Jun 09, 2018

    Inspired by the historian Orlando Figes' Natasha's Dance: A Cultural History of Russia, Joe Wright's Promethean staging of Leo Tolstoy's beloved romantic tragedy in a Russian theatre is awe-inspiring in grandeur and passion.

    Inspired by the historian Orlando Figes' Natasha's Dance: A Cultural History of Russia, Joe Wright's Promethean staging of Leo Tolstoy's beloved romantic tragedy in a Russian theatre is awe-inspiring in grandeur and passion.

  • Jun 03, 2018

    Joe Wright skillfully adapts a classic book into a stylized film whose theatrical flair proves too distracting to be functional.

    Joe Wright skillfully adapts a classic book into a stylized film whose theatrical flair proves too distracting to be functional.