Battle Royale II Reviews

  • Nov 26, 2018

    This movie made me legit die inside. I just watched the original film before this so I could have a double feature. And I was so hyped for this movie but this movie felt like a rehash of the same thing but worse and cringe. It felt like it had the same script and most of the adults are the same from the original film but the kids were new. The kids were cringe, I’m done talking about this monstrosity of a movie.

    This movie made me legit die inside. I just watched the original film before this so I could have a double feature. And I was so hyped for this movie but this movie felt like a rehash of the same thing but worse and cringe. It felt like it had the same script and most of the adults are the same from the original film but the kids were new. The kids were cringe, I’m done talking about this monstrosity of a movie.

  • Apr 25, 2018

    I am one of the few who loves this movie. I will not give it five stars. There were aspects of this movie I hated. It was too unrealistic how Takuma and his friend didn't hug when they reunited near the very end. Embraces should be seen when one reunites with their friends after they believed him to be most likely dead. Or how one of the boy's older sister was part of the Wild Seven, and his way of saying goodbye to her was saying how he won't ever forget her. His sister cried as she kept her back turned on him. I rewatched that part on Netflix earlier and teared up a bit, but still. What kind of siblings don't share at least a hug when one of them might die in an intense battle? Way too unrealistic and lame. We don't even get to see a reunion hug the first time he sees her again. We don't even get to see them have a one-on-one interaction beyond that moment. The sister says his name as she dies, which is still a sweet moment, but my whole disapproval of this movie's case of a lack of realism when there can be is frustrating. Frustrating enough for me not to give this film five stars. But I will say the military aspect of it drew me in much more than the first movie did. Wars, military firearms, and fights on islands allure me with an intense ferocity. So, I might just say I love this movie more than I love the first Battle Royale film. The best scene is the beach scene, of course. It was realistic how the students turned soldiers reacted to that psuedo-war scene. I loved it. Their panic was realistic, like the panic scene from them while they were in those aquatic vehicles, getting shot at. I despise how Shuya didn't hug Noriko when they had their own reunion, too. That was another unrealistic and potential tender moment this movie's creators ruined. Another reason why I will not give this film five stars. The final reason I won't give this film five stars is the fact the teacher having a collar attached to the Wild Seven's bomb detonation machine was not explained. This frustrates me. Other than all that, if there is anyone with an high interest in war and the military, you should watch this film.

    I am one of the few who loves this movie. I will not give it five stars. There were aspects of this movie I hated. It was too unrealistic how Takuma and his friend didn't hug when they reunited near the very end. Embraces should be seen when one reunites with their friends after they believed him to be most likely dead. Or how one of the boy's older sister was part of the Wild Seven, and his way of saying goodbye to her was saying how he won't ever forget her. His sister cried as she kept her back turned on him. I rewatched that part on Netflix earlier and teared up a bit, but still. What kind of siblings don't share at least a hug when one of them might die in an intense battle? Way too unrealistic and lame. We don't even get to see a reunion hug the first time he sees her again. We don't even get to see them have a one-on-one interaction beyond that moment. The sister says his name as she dies, which is still a sweet moment, but my whole disapproval of this movie's case of a lack of realism when there can be is frustrating. Frustrating enough for me not to give this film five stars. But I will say the military aspect of it drew me in much more than the first movie did. Wars, military firearms, and fights on islands allure me with an intense ferocity. So, I might just say I love this movie more than I love the first Battle Royale film. The best scene is the beach scene, of course. It was realistic how the students turned soldiers reacted to that psuedo-war scene. I loved it. Their panic was realistic, like the panic scene from them while they were in those aquatic vehicles, getting shot at. I despise how Shuya didn't hug Noriko when they had their own reunion, too. That was another unrealistic and potential tender moment this movie's creators ruined. Another reason why I will not give this film five stars. The final reason I won't give this film five stars is the fact the teacher having a collar attached to the Wild Seven's bomb detonation machine was not explained. This frustrates me. Other than all that, if there is anyone with an high interest in war and the military, you should watch this film.

  • Jesse O Super Reviewer
    Apr 01, 2018

    For the time being, and I don't know how long it's gonna be since I haven't checked since last night prior to watching this, the reviews will be done on my phone. The Chrome browser on my laptop went nuts. Opening tabs nonstop, I can't uninstall it since every time I try to the browser opens up again. I can't really use an alternate browser, because Chrome will pop up every time a new tab is opened. Hoping it's a bit of a glitch. I hope it is, because it's really annoying to type out reviews on this phone. I digress, it's time to talk about Battle Royale as a whole and how some people like to lord it over fans of the Hunger Games because the first movie, they feel, is a rip-off of the original Battle Royale. Yes, because the people killing each other for others' entertainment/enjoyment wasn't around prior to Battle Royale. Movies like Death Race and Running Man DIDN'T come out before Battle Royale. I suppose they mean the fact that the original Hunger Games, in essence, sees the same basic concept of teens being dropped onto an island where they have to kill each other as a result of some government mandate. I can't disagree with that comparison in the slightest. But, to the Hunger Games' credit, its focus shifted from the competition itself, to the political struggle between the government and the Resistance over Katniss Everdeen, whom they want to use as a propaganda tool to push their own agendas. It's really cool stuff. And, to be, I think the Hunger Games does more with its concept, as a continuing franchise, than Battle Royale did with its original movie and this sequel. The Condemned (a shitty WWE-produced movie) is more of a rip-off of the original Battle Royale. The reason I bring this YA-novel into this review is the fact of the matter that the majority of this movie, once the second round of teens meets up with the terrorist group and their leader, ends up feeling like some of the second-tier franchises that started popping up after the Hunger Games was successful. The Divergents and Maze Runners of the world, where a group of teens (part of a resistance) fight back against their oppressors, usually some figure high up in this dystopian world. So, in a way, you could say that Battle Royale II was ahead of its time. It just so happens to be a shame that what this sequel offers is so much more generic and uninteresting than anything in the original movie. The best sections of the movie are those that embrace the absolute over-the-top nature of the concept. Everything with Riki Takeuchi at the start is absolutely tremendous. Tremendous in that Riki Takeuchi, who's a Japanese B-movie legend, overacts the shit out of his first scene with the new subjects, laying down the ground rules for what they're about to do. It creates a good contrast to Takeshi Kitano's stoic performance in the original movie. Riki Takeuchi, pretty much playing himself, just takes the chance and he cuts loose and delivers an incredibly entertaining performance. Hell, his performance put me in a good mood that I was with the movie from that point onward. And that's despite the fact that everything after that point, until the new batch of teens meets up with the terrorist rebel group, feels like a boring war movie, complete with D-Day style sequence of the teens coming out of their boats to face fire from the terrorist group. I was enjoying the over-the-top violence, in spite of everything. I think that over-the-top goodwill is lost once the new group meets up with Wild Seven and their leader. This is where the movie falls apart. I don't wanna say I don't value story, but if you're gonna introduce more story and "world-building", at least make sure that it's worthwhile. I honestly could not have given a single fuck about any of the characters in this movie. No one outside of Riki Takeuchi was of any interest to me and the fact that they kept trying to make me invest in this Wild Seven rebel group and their struggles for peace and justice is one of, if not, the worst parts of this film. I get that they weren't trying to just repeat the first story with a new cast of characters, but the movie gets way too self-serious for its own good. It wouldn't have been such a big issue if Takeshi Kitano and his stoic presence was still overseeing the Battle Royale, but his character died. But when you see Riki Takeuchi act like a fucking madman, which I'm assuming is what he is in real life, the self-serious tone halfway through is a real jarring one. And it makes the movie much worse. The leader of the Wild Seven group talks and talks and talks without really saying anything. There's some dick-measuring here between the leader of Wild Seven and Taku that leads to, you guessed it, mutual respect. Kitano's daughter from the first movie is here to kill the leader of the rebel group for murdering her father. She, inexplicably, ends up fighting for the group's cause. It's not that she couldn't or shouldn't have joined their side, it's just that it comes out of nowhere and they refuse to explain why. It just happened and you're not supposed to question it. As I mentioned, the sequel is more "character-driven", but they were bunch of bodies to me. No one stuck out and it made investing in their plight near impossible. Another one of the film's biggest problems is the fact that it's so damn long. There's no reason in this fucking world, or any other, that this should be over two hours long. Tell me, really, what is there to this movie where 2+ hours of length is justifiable. It just doesn't really expand on the world in a way that I found interesting or compelling. I understand that Kinji Fukusaku, director of the original movie, died after filming the scene with Takeshi Kitano and his son, Kenta (who wrote this and the original) finished it for him. But he just failed to capture the spirit of the original movie. You can tell a different story from a new perspective, and there's no problem with that, but the only thing this shares with the original movie is the name. The clever social satire is gone in favor of a painfully dull 'war' drama focusing on a cast of characters that have no real discernible personalities. You don't care about anything that happens to anyone that isn't named Riki Takeuchi. In fact, this is everything a sequel should strive NOT to be. I've seen worse, but this is still a bad movie. Give me everything that Riki Takeuchi filmed for this that ended up on the cutting room floor and I'd enjoy that SOOOO much more, it's not even funny. He's the reason this gets the rating it does. Other than him, this is just a bad movie, no way to slice it other than that.

    For the time being, and I don't know how long it's gonna be since I haven't checked since last night prior to watching this, the reviews will be done on my phone. The Chrome browser on my laptop went nuts. Opening tabs nonstop, I can't uninstall it since every time I try to the browser opens up again. I can't really use an alternate browser, because Chrome will pop up every time a new tab is opened. Hoping it's a bit of a glitch. I hope it is, because it's really annoying to type out reviews on this phone. I digress, it's time to talk about Battle Royale as a whole and how some people like to lord it over fans of the Hunger Games because the first movie, they feel, is a rip-off of the original Battle Royale. Yes, because the people killing each other for others' entertainment/enjoyment wasn't around prior to Battle Royale. Movies like Death Race and Running Man DIDN'T come out before Battle Royale. I suppose they mean the fact that the original Hunger Games, in essence, sees the same basic concept of teens being dropped onto an island where they have to kill each other as a result of some government mandate. I can't disagree with that comparison in the slightest. But, to the Hunger Games' credit, its focus shifted from the competition itself, to the political struggle between the government and the Resistance over Katniss Everdeen, whom they want to use as a propaganda tool to push their own agendas. It's really cool stuff. And, to be, I think the Hunger Games does more with its concept, as a continuing franchise, than Battle Royale did with its original movie and this sequel. The Condemned (a shitty WWE-produced movie) is more of a rip-off of the original Battle Royale. The reason I bring this YA-novel into this review is the fact of the matter that the majority of this movie, once the second round of teens meets up with the terrorist group and their leader, ends up feeling like some of the second-tier franchises that started popping up after the Hunger Games was successful. The Divergents and Maze Runners of the world, where a group of teens (part of a resistance) fight back against their oppressors, usually some figure high up in this dystopian world. So, in a way, you could say that Battle Royale II was ahead of its time. It just so happens to be a shame that what this sequel offers is so much more generic and uninteresting than anything in the original movie. The best sections of the movie are those that embrace the absolute over-the-top nature of the concept. Everything with Riki Takeuchi at the start is absolutely tremendous. Tremendous in that Riki Takeuchi, who's a Japanese B-movie legend, overacts the shit out of his first scene with the new subjects, laying down the ground rules for what they're about to do. It creates a good contrast to Takeshi Kitano's stoic performance in the original movie. Riki Takeuchi, pretty much playing himself, just takes the chance and he cuts loose and delivers an incredibly entertaining performance. Hell, his performance put me in a good mood that I was with the movie from that point onward. And that's despite the fact that everything after that point, until the new batch of teens meets up with the terrorist rebel group, feels like a boring war movie, complete with D-Day style sequence of the teens coming out of their boats to face fire from the terrorist group. I was enjoying the over-the-top violence, in spite of everything. I think that over-the-top goodwill is lost once the new group meets up with Wild Seven and their leader. This is where the movie falls apart. I don't wanna say I don't value story, but if you're gonna introduce more story and "world-building", at least make sure that it's worthwhile. I honestly could not have given a single fuck about any of the characters in this movie. No one outside of Riki Takeuchi was of any interest to me and the fact that they kept trying to make me invest in this Wild Seven rebel group and their struggles for peace and justice is one of, if not, the worst parts of this film. I get that they weren't trying to just repeat the first story with a new cast of characters, but the movie gets way too self-serious for its own good. It wouldn't have been such a big issue if Takeshi Kitano and his stoic presence was still overseeing the Battle Royale, but his character died. But when you see Riki Takeuchi act like a fucking madman, which I'm assuming is what he is in real life, the self-serious tone halfway through is a real jarring one. And it makes the movie much worse. The leader of the Wild Seven group talks and talks and talks without really saying anything. There's some dick-measuring here between the leader of Wild Seven and Taku that leads to, you guessed it, mutual respect. Kitano's daughter from the first movie is here to kill the leader of the rebel group for murdering her father. She, inexplicably, ends up fighting for the group's cause. It's not that she couldn't or shouldn't have joined their side, it's just that it comes out of nowhere and they refuse to explain why. It just happened and you're not supposed to question it. As I mentioned, the sequel is more "character-driven", but they were bunch of bodies to me. No one stuck out and it made investing in their plight near impossible. Another one of the film's biggest problems is the fact that it's so damn long. There's no reason in this fucking world, or any other, that this should be over two hours long. Tell me, really, what is there to this movie where 2+ hours of length is justifiable. It just doesn't really expand on the world in a way that I found interesting or compelling. I understand that Kinji Fukusaku, director of the original movie, died after filming the scene with Takeshi Kitano and his son, Kenta (who wrote this and the original) finished it for him. But he just failed to capture the spirit of the original movie. You can tell a different story from a new perspective, and there's no problem with that, but the only thing this shares with the original movie is the name. The clever social satire is gone in favor of a painfully dull 'war' drama focusing on a cast of characters that have no real discernible personalities. You don't care about anything that happens to anyone that isn't named Riki Takeuchi. In fact, this is everything a sequel should strive NOT to be. I've seen worse, but this is still a bad movie. Give me everything that Riki Takeuchi filmed for this that ended up on the cutting room floor and I'd enjoy that SOOOO much more, it's not even funny. He's the reason this gets the rating it does. Other than him, this is just a bad movie, no way to slice it other than that.

  • Nov 10, 2017

    2.5/5. While Battle Royale 2 has some fantastic action scenes, the rest of the movie is boring, nonsensical, and bizarre. It's somewhat entertaining, but not to the point where I can recommend it. Nowhere near as good as the original.

    2.5/5. While Battle Royale 2 has some fantastic action scenes, the rest of the movie is boring, nonsensical, and bizarre. It's somewhat entertaining, but not to the point where I can recommend it. Nowhere near as good as the original.

  • Jan 13, 2017

    A fun splatter film, it isn't as good as the first but offers some interesting characters and fun gore.

    A fun splatter film, it isn't as good as the first but offers some interesting characters and fun gore.

  • Dec 03, 2016

    Battle Royale 2 is the direct follow-up to the wildly controversial, but successful predecessor, that picks up three years after the events of the first film and like so many sequels before it, became a shell of what made the first one so unique and I was shocked at how bad this sequel was. The film is very far-removed from the original, with a storyline more akin to Red Dawn, with a class of students being recruited to assassinate Shuya Nanahara, the winner of the original Battle Royale tournament, who has now become an extremist battling against any and all adults for what they've done to society. The battle to the death concept is completely dropped in favour of this war-centered narrative, but it doesn't work, even for a moment, and only amounts to a few action scenes and A LOT of dry monologues that nearly put me to sleep. Right off the bat this film left a bad taste in my mouth with the cringe-worthy, over-acting from many of the young Japanese cast, who resort to wildly animating their bodies and screaming their dialogue at the top of their lungs; almost as if they were in a live-action anime. Stripping the death-battle scenario from the first film was a HUGE mistake and in all honesty, this film simply didn't need to exist, and after the first thirty minutes, the entire class is wiped out in a Saving Private Ryan-esque beach battle, save for a few characters. This film was partly directed by the original film's helmer, Kinji Fukasaku, but after his tragic passing midway through production, the directing duties were picked up by his son, Kenta Fukasaku, who is the writer of both films, but clearly doesn't have his father's expertise. There are practically no characters to care about, the violence is tame and repetitive with too much CGI blood, and I lost interest in the plot after only the first act. Battle Royale 2 didn't need to happen, but it exists and it is an awful follow-up to the outstanding original, and I'm just going to pretend it doesn't exist, because there is nothing to recommend here.

    Battle Royale 2 is the direct follow-up to the wildly controversial, but successful predecessor, that picks up three years after the events of the first film and like so many sequels before it, became a shell of what made the first one so unique and I was shocked at how bad this sequel was. The film is very far-removed from the original, with a storyline more akin to Red Dawn, with a class of students being recruited to assassinate Shuya Nanahara, the winner of the original Battle Royale tournament, who has now become an extremist battling against any and all adults for what they've done to society. The battle to the death concept is completely dropped in favour of this war-centered narrative, but it doesn't work, even for a moment, and only amounts to a few action scenes and A LOT of dry monologues that nearly put me to sleep. Right off the bat this film left a bad taste in my mouth with the cringe-worthy, over-acting from many of the young Japanese cast, who resort to wildly animating their bodies and screaming their dialogue at the top of their lungs; almost as if they were in a live-action anime. Stripping the death-battle scenario from the first film was a HUGE mistake and in all honesty, this film simply didn't need to exist, and after the first thirty minutes, the entire class is wiped out in a Saving Private Ryan-esque beach battle, save for a few characters. This film was partly directed by the original film's helmer, Kinji Fukasaku, but after his tragic passing midway through production, the directing duties were picked up by his son, Kenta Fukasaku, who is the writer of both films, but clearly doesn't have his father's expertise. There are practically no characters to care about, the violence is tame and repetitive with too much CGI blood, and I lost interest in the plot after only the first act. Battle Royale 2 didn't need to happen, but it exists and it is an awful follow-up to the outstanding original, and I'm just going to pretend it doesn't exist, because there is nothing to recommend here.

  • Oct 17, 2016

    The novelty of the concept of the first movie had really lost its flavor. They do try to shake things up, but nothing that is new feels worthy of being its own new story. It's nice to see that American movies aren't the only ones that get drowned in unnecessary sequels.

    The novelty of the concept of the first movie had really lost its flavor. They do try to shake things up, but nothing that is new feels worthy of being its own new story. It's nice to see that American movies aren't the only ones that get drowned in unnecessary sequels.

  • Sep 08, 2016

    This movie was just plain weird.The first one was so cool that this one was just a big big flop to be honest. what a shame///

    This movie was just plain weird.The first one was so cool that this one was just a big big flop to be honest. what a shame///

  • Apr 08, 2016

    Si une suite au premier film pouvais s'avérer une idée intéressante sur papier, le produit fini l'est malheureusement beaucoup. Le scénario est lent et confus, sans grand intérêts et la réalisation manque un peu de ce qui avais fais le succès du premier film. Les acteurs sont également peu convaincant.

    Si une suite au premier film pouvais s'avérer une idée intéressante sur papier, le produit fini l'est malheureusement beaucoup. Le scénario est lent et confus, sans grand intérêts et la réalisation manque un peu de ce qui avais fais le succès du premier film. Les acteurs sont également peu convaincant.

  • Jan 18, 2016

    This is nothing like the original, and the rules for the game in the sequel are too twisted and lack the same structure as did the first game that made the original movie an incredibly smart blend of tragedy and melodrama.

    This is nothing like the original, and the rules for the game in the sequel are too twisted and lack the same structure as did the first game that made the original movie an incredibly smart blend of tragedy and melodrama.