Reviews

  • Nov 07, 2021

    Probably not a movie for everyone, but as a Sci-Fi and fantasy fan, I have to say I really enjoyed it! The movie is no Star Wars or Dune so I will not put it in that League when writing this review- movies can be good in different ways. This movie seems to aim at being more easily digestible (than other deep fantasy movies/ books). It's funny and entertaining and I enjoyed the concept- I was left intrigued, wanting to find out more about all the different races and the backstory. Actually, I wish the movie was longer and I am happy about the fact that there will be a sequel- in the end, I wanted more. I think being into this genre helps, but it is a really enjoyable movie.

    Probably not a movie for everyone, but as a Sci-Fi and fantasy fan, I have to say I really enjoyed it! The movie is no Star Wars or Dune so I will not put it in that League when writing this review- movies can be good in different ways. This movie seems to aim at being more easily digestible (than other deep fantasy movies/ books). It's funny and entertaining and I enjoyed the concept- I was left intrigued, wanting to find out more about all the different races and the backstory. Actually, I wish the movie was longer and I am happy about the fact that there will be a sequel- in the end, I wanted more. I think being into this genre helps, but it is a really enjoyable movie.

  • Nov 06, 2021

    This film is heavily underestimated and in my opinion it deserves more, because it is a good fantasy crime film that manages to intelligently mix the two genres. True it has holes and imperfections, but it is still valid as a film and entertains a lot without ever getting tired or repetitive

    This film is heavily underestimated and in my opinion it deserves more, because it is a good fantasy crime film that manages to intelligently mix the two genres. True it has holes and imperfections, but it is still valid as a film and entertains a lot without ever getting tired or repetitive

  • Oct 27, 2021

    It's a shame that such a rich concept cannot be fully realized. This is the case with this movie. Instead of expanding the mythology that it is trying to lay or doubling down on a compelling narrative of the social commentary it seems it wants to dive into, it sticks to the clichéd written police procedural movie that we've seen time and time again. If they make a sequel, I will watch it because the world is fascinating but, that's the only thing fascinating about it. Will Smith does the Will Smith thing and it still works to a certain extent but, they need to do better.

    It's a shame that such a rich concept cannot be fully realized. This is the case with this movie. Instead of expanding the mythology that it is trying to lay or doubling down on a compelling narrative of the social commentary it seems it wants to dive into, it sticks to the clichéd written police procedural movie that we've seen time and time again. If they make a sequel, I will watch it because the world is fascinating but, that's the only thing fascinating about it. Will Smith does the Will Smith thing and it still works to a certain extent but, they need to do better.

  • Sep 23, 2021

    Must patience to watch this movie. From the beginning it look boring, like some old gangsta film, but after the safehouse incident it become interesting. For the people who like attractive movie the beginning maybe will stop watching the movie before in the middle of movie. But for the men like me who like to searching hypotesa especially in real life, it's quite interesting. Let your brain work out. Don't be lazy.

    Must patience to watch this movie. From the beginning it look boring, like some old gangsta film, but after the safehouse incident it become interesting. For the people who like attractive movie the beginning maybe will stop watching the movie before in the middle of movie. But for the men like me who like to searching hypotesa especially in real life, it's quite interesting. Let your brain work out. Don't be lazy.

  • Sep 19, 2021

    Não é uma obra maravilhosa,mas é divertida

    Não é uma obra maravilhosa,mas é divertida

  • Sep 18, 2021

    I was surprised that I'd never heard of this Will Smith flick until Netflix streaming's algorithm offered it up to me. The mash up of LOTR creatures overlaid into contemporary culture in L.A. was interesting.

    I was surprised that I'd never heard of this Will Smith flick until Netflix streaming's algorithm offered it up to me. The mash up of LOTR creatures overlaid into contemporary culture in L.A. was interesting.

  • Aug 19, 2021

    Funded and produced by Netflix, Bright sees director David Ayer reuniting with Will Smith for the first time since 2016's almost unwatchable Suicide Squad. Bright's premise certainly promises more than what we got from Suicide Squad, set in an alternate Los Angeles where Elves, Orcs and Humans live alongside each other (along with various other fantasy creatures). Will Smith is a human cop, and partners the departments' first ever Orc police officer, a hilarious Joel Edgerton, unrecognisable underneath the prosthetics. The first half of the film promises much, there's plenty of discrimination and cultural appropriation that feels especially prescient in today's society, and Bright uses its first hour or so setting up what promises to be an interesting second half. It's a shame therefore, that the second half runs out of ideas so swiftly, resorting to shoot out after shoot out, and choosing to solve the problems of the plot by satisfying the average idiot who just wants to watch people hitting each other in increasingly hard to care about fight sequences. It's especially disappointing after the film sets up such an interesting world and rules, and then follows them thoroughly for an hour or so before giving up. What is interesting is that there appears to be a sequel in the works, and one wonders which direction that will go.

    Funded and produced by Netflix, Bright sees director David Ayer reuniting with Will Smith for the first time since 2016's almost unwatchable Suicide Squad. Bright's premise certainly promises more than what we got from Suicide Squad, set in an alternate Los Angeles where Elves, Orcs and Humans live alongside each other (along with various other fantasy creatures). Will Smith is a human cop, and partners the departments' first ever Orc police officer, a hilarious Joel Edgerton, unrecognisable underneath the prosthetics. The first half of the film promises much, there's plenty of discrimination and cultural appropriation that feels especially prescient in today's society, and Bright uses its first hour or so setting up what promises to be an interesting second half. It's a shame therefore, that the second half runs out of ideas so swiftly, resorting to shoot out after shoot out, and choosing to solve the problems of the plot by satisfying the average idiot who just wants to watch people hitting each other in increasingly hard to care about fight sequences. It's especially disappointing after the film sets up such an interesting world and rules, and then follows them thoroughly for an hour or so before giving up. What is interesting is that there appears to be a sequel in the works, and one wonders which direction that will go.

  • Aug 06, 2021

    Amazing movie, you guys need to make a sequel. Loved every single frame of this one.

    Amazing movie, you guys need to make a sequel. Loved every single frame of this one.

  • Jul 25, 2021

    Tiene sus detalles, pero me gustó bastante, quiero ver una segunda y tercera parte para completar el ciclo épico.

    Tiene sus detalles, pero me gustó bastante, quiero ver una segunda y tercera parte para completar el ciclo épico.

  • Jul 19, 2021

    Bright: An Orc with a Badge Bright the movie is unique. The setting is dystopian downtown Los Angeles - many square miles of concrete pavement and graffiti-covered buildings meet the gloom of a dark sky. In this urban fantasy the street-art is dark with spray tags depicting war and the coming of the Dark Lord. The city is populated with elves, fairies, orcs, and humans - a melting pot of races and cultures with resulting racial tension. Elves are on top of the social ladder; they have the money and the power. Orcs are on the bottom. Two officers on LAPD, are human Daryl Ward (played by Will Smith) and Orc Nick Jakoby (played by Joel Edgerton.) Jakoby is the first Orc ever to be made a police officer in LA. and Ward is not happy they made Jakoby his partner. Officer Daryl Ward has problems to overcome – his prejudice against Orcs, his narrow-mindedness in not being able to accept an Orc as a partner, and his offensive off-color jokes directed at Jakoby. Over-coming his racist views and learning to trust his partner does not look promising for Ward. "Orcs are dumb! Mama says Nick is going to get you killed, Daddy!" Daryl Ward's daughter is worried about her dad. Daryl replies to her with a lesson, "All races are different, Sophia, and different doesn't mean smarter or dumber, better or worse than anybody else." His fatherly lessons about equality for all does not seem to apply to fairies because five minutes later, Daryl is in his front yard, swiping at a fairy. "Fairy lives don't matter today!" he calls out and smashes the fairy to death (which may be a statement about police brutality - LAPD has a bad reputation for brutality in this movie.) Soon after, Nick Jakoby drives to pick up Daryl Ward at his home, Daryl says to him, "Why are you at my house? Why are you on my lawn? Do not ever come here!" Daryl Ward is a hypocrite and does not seem to care about Nick's feelings. Even Sophia, Daryl's daughter, hears him and says, "Don't tell Nick to shut up – he's a person too!" Sophia recognizes the injustice her dad shows to Nick. Racist metaphors are common, and Officer Daryl Ward is brutal. He tells Nick, "Your job is to make sure I go home at night." Ward clearly feels superior. Officers in their department also hate Nick, and all Orcs in general, "Orcs are slow and sluggish, like a defensive lineman. It's not racism, it's physics," and another says, "My ancestors killed them by the fu***ng thousands in Russia." Instead of defending Nick, Daryl replies, "Listen, I don't want this guy in my car either." Almost any statement made about Orcs, can be replaced by any minority - African Americans, Mexicans, Asians - and the references are recognizable. "No Orkish music!" Daryl yells at him, another put-down when Nick turns on the radio. The brutality against Orcs is evident when they are called to an altercation – cops are beating up orcs, pounding on them, with no-one questioning or interfering. Daryl looks on with bored disinterest because Orcs are always assumed guilty. Nick says, "Why are Orcs always the bad guys?" Nick is a good cop, and he understands that he must try harder to prove himself against the unfair and unjust bigotry. Nick just wants to be accepted. He says all he ever wanted was to be a cop, "My badge means more to me than the air I breathe." He is caught between two societies. He tries explaining to Daryl, "When an Orc sees me, they see a wanna-be human, and when a human sees me, they see an animal, they hate me." Nick is strong, smart, loyal, and kind. Nick's vulnerability makes him more human than some humans. This issue of trust also comes up. Cops needs to trust their partner; this can be a matter of life and death. They must be able to find trust between them to survive. When Ward tells Nick he needs to trust him, Nick, knowingly, says back to Daryl, "Oh, so I'm supposed to trust you when you don't trust me?" Daryl might be starting to come around and understand the situation when he replies, "You got a point there." Trust is not easily earned, but Nick proves himself over and over to be an honest and dependable partner. Nick always has Daryl's back in the life-and-death situations they found themselves. Daryl realizes that as a partner, he could not have anyone more loyal than Nick Jakoby and their differences were over-come. They finally respect each other and can each throw one-liners at each other in friendship. Work Cited Bright. Directed by David Ayer, Netflix, 2017.

    Bright: An Orc with a Badge Bright the movie is unique. The setting is dystopian downtown Los Angeles - many square miles of concrete pavement and graffiti-covered buildings meet the gloom of a dark sky. In this urban fantasy the street-art is dark with spray tags depicting war and the coming of the Dark Lord. The city is populated with elves, fairies, orcs, and humans - a melting pot of races and cultures with resulting racial tension. Elves are on top of the social ladder; they have the money and the power. Orcs are on the bottom. Two officers on LAPD, are human Daryl Ward (played by Will Smith) and Orc Nick Jakoby (played by Joel Edgerton.) Jakoby is the first Orc ever to be made a police officer in LA. and Ward is not happy they made Jakoby his partner. Officer Daryl Ward has problems to overcome – his prejudice against Orcs, his narrow-mindedness in not being able to accept an Orc as a partner, and his offensive off-color jokes directed at Jakoby. Over-coming his racist views and learning to trust his partner does not look promising for Ward. "Orcs are dumb! Mama says Nick is going to get you killed, Daddy!" Daryl Ward's daughter is worried about her dad. Daryl replies to her with a lesson, "All races are different, Sophia, and different doesn't mean smarter or dumber, better or worse than anybody else." His fatherly lessons about equality for all does not seem to apply to fairies because five minutes later, Daryl is in his front yard, swiping at a fairy. "Fairy lives don't matter today!" he calls out and smashes the fairy to death (which may be a statement about police brutality - LAPD has a bad reputation for brutality in this movie.) Soon after, Nick Jakoby drives to pick up Daryl Ward at his home, Daryl says to him, "Why are you at my house? Why are you on my lawn? Do not ever come here!" Daryl Ward is a hypocrite and does not seem to care about Nick's feelings. Even Sophia, Daryl's daughter, hears him and says, "Don't tell Nick to shut up – he's a person too!" Sophia recognizes the injustice her dad shows to Nick. Racist metaphors are common, and Officer Daryl Ward is brutal. He tells Nick, "Your job is to make sure I go home at night." Ward clearly feels superior. Officers in their department also hate Nick, and all Orcs in general, "Orcs are slow and sluggish, like a defensive lineman. It's not racism, it's physics," and another says, "My ancestors killed them by the fu***ng thousands in Russia." Instead of defending Nick, Daryl replies, "Listen, I don't want this guy in my car either." Almost any statement made about Orcs, can be replaced by any minority - African Americans, Mexicans, Asians - and the references are recognizable. "No Orkish music!" Daryl yells at him, another put-down when Nick turns on the radio. The brutality against Orcs is evident when they are called to an altercation – cops are beating up orcs, pounding on them, with no-one questioning or interfering. Daryl looks on with bored disinterest because Orcs are always assumed guilty. Nick says, "Why are Orcs always the bad guys?" Nick is a good cop, and he understands that he must try harder to prove himself against the unfair and unjust bigotry. Nick just wants to be accepted. He says all he ever wanted was to be a cop, "My badge means more to me than the air I breathe." He is caught between two societies. He tries explaining to Daryl, "When an Orc sees me, they see a wanna-be human, and when a human sees me, they see an animal, they hate me." Nick is strong, smart, loyal, and kind. Nick's vulnerability makes him more human than some humans. This issue of trust also comes up. Cops needs to trust their partner; this can be a matter of life and death. They must be able to find trust between them to survive. When Ward tells Nick he needs to trust him, Nick, knowingly, says back to Daryl, "Oh, so I'm supposed to trust you when you don't trust me?" Daryl might be starting to come around and understand the situation when he replies, "You got a point there." Trust is not easily earned, but Nick proves himself over and over to be an honest and dependable partner. Nick always has Daryl's back in the life-and-death situations they found themselves. Daryl realizes that as a partner, he could not have anyone more loyal than Nick Jakoby and their differences were over-come. They finally respect each other and can each throw one-liners at each other in friendship. Work Cited Bright. Directed by David Ayer, Netflix, 2017.