Little Big Man Reviews

  • Apr 19, 2019

    Just fun! My wife and I have gone back to watch this a few times.

    Just fun! My wife and I have gone back to watch this a few times.

  • Jan 26, 2019

    The best Western movie ever made!

    The best Western movie ever made!

  • Jan 15, 2019

    this is an alright movie but ive seen about 500 westerns so far and there's thousands more to watch. why did they make so many?

    this is an alright movie but ive seen about 500 westerns so far and there's thousands more to watch. why did they make so many?

  • Dec 09, 2018

    Awesome. They don't make them like this anymore.

    Awesome. They don't make them like this anymore.

  • Mar 11, 2018

    My mother once told me that Little Big Man was one of her favorite movies. I remember her saying that the 1960s were a very cynical decade but that the 1970s cinema seemed to get back its heart. When I first saw Little Big Man I remember scoffing at it--what the filmmakers thought it was supposed to be. A drama? A comedy? A satire of history? Something self important or not important at all? Perhaps I didn't appreciate it back then, but what I take from the movie now is that it's a shady version of the truth--like all history is--and it's as funny and disturbing as real life can be. The movie tells the story of Jack Crabb (played subtly brilliant by a young Dustin Hoffman), a white man who grew up with American Indians and then later joined the white culture of late 1800s America. His unique upbringing allowed him to move back and forth into two different worlds, two different extreme cultures. Both cultures had altogether different values but the same apparent life dissatisfaction, not to mention an unreserved hatred of one another. Not only did I personally relate to the protagonist's strange dilemma but I also saw it as a metaphor for the different perspectives we we are arbitrarily born into in life. Everything we take for granted, everything we believe but haven't actually learned. Perhaps the film, like the novel it was based on, is a testament to neutrality, pacifism and non-violent resistance. It may well be the antithesis of most 1970s films, which were hard anti-establishment and pro-Democratic. Little Big Man was actually one of the very first films to depict Native American sympathetically, since in years past conservative filmmakers painted them as "savages". But somehow, as I watched the story of Jack Crabb come and go, as uneventful in the stream of time as it was truly unique to behold, I couldn't help but wonder if it truly is the definitive post-patriotic meditational experiment. In an age of Right vs Left war that never really ends, isn't the only winner the one who lives to tell the story of the bloodshed?

    My mother once told me that Little Big Man was one of her favorite movies. I remember her saying that the 1960s were a very cynical decade but that the 1970s cinema seemed to get back its heart. When I first saw Little Big Man I remember scoffing at it--what the filmmakers thought it was supposed to be. A drama? A comedy? A satire of history? Something self important or not important at all? Perhaps I didn't appreciate it back then, but what I take from the movie now is that it's a shady version of the truth--like all history is--and it's as funny and disturbing as real life can be. The movie tells the story of Jack Crabb (played subtly brilliant by a young Dustin Hoffman), a white man who grew up with American Indians and then later joined the white culture of late 1800s America. His unique upbringing allowed him to move back and forth into two different worlds, two different extreme cultures. Both cultures had altogether different values but the same apparent life dissatisfaction, not to mention an unreserved hatred of one another. Not only did I personally relate to the protagonist's strange dilemma but I also saw it as a metaphor for the different perspectives we we are arbitrarily born into in life. Everything we take for granted, everything we believe but haven't actually learned. Perhaps the film, like the novel it was based on, is a testament to neutrality, pacifism and non-violent resistance. It may well be the antithesis of most 1970s films, which were hard anti-establishment and pro-Democratic. Little Big Man was actually one of the very first films to depict Native American sympathetically, since in years past conservative filmmakers painted them as "savages". But somehow, as I watched the story of Jack Crabb come and go, as uneventful in the stream of time as it was truly unique to behold, I couldn't help but wonder if it truly is the definitive post-patriotic meditational experiment. In an age of Right vs Left war that never really ends, isn't the only winner the one who lives to tell the story of the bloodshed?

  • Jan 02, 2018

    A revisionist Western classic.

    A revisionist Western classic.

  • Dec 08, 2017

    As a Native American, I give this flick my stamp of approval for being the most accurate portrayal of the portrayal of the Indian wars and the Battle of the Greasy Grass aka, Custer's Last Stand. Hoffman's acting is beyond reproach as he depicts a young boy raised by natives, and torn between two cultures. Chief Dan George is a much beloved leader who is very authentic and true to form as the elder/leader of the people. Anyone who views this film cannot help but be moved by the dignity and plight of American Indians as they fight for and loose their freedom in this true to life film.

    As a Native American, I give this flick my stamp of approval for being the most accurate portrayal of the portrayal of the Indian wars and the Battle of the Greasy Grass aka, Custer's Last Stand. Hoffman's acting is beyond reproach as he depicts a young boy raised by natives, and torn between two cultures. Chief Dan George is a much beloved leader who is very authentic and true to form as the elder/leader of the people. Anyone who views this film cannot help but be moved by the dignity and plight of American Indians as they fight for and loose their freedom in this true to life film.

  • Oct 28, 2017

    If you haven't seen this movie, you're no Hoffman fan. His BEST. Faye is famously flirtatious and infatuating in this movie. Had to drive 70 miles to see this back in the day...A wee bit controversial. CHIEF DAN GORGEOUS GEORGE. This movie helped start lots of young people to think differently and to question our history. Soldier Blue too.

    If you haven't seen this movie, you're no Hoffman fan. His BEST. Faye is famously flirtatious and infatuating in this movie. Had to drive 70 miles to see this back in the day...A wee bit controversial. CHIEF DAN GORGEOUS GEORGE. This movie helped start lots of young people to think differently and to question our history. Soldier Blue too.

  • Oct 04, 2017

    I wasn't expecting to like this so much for some reason but here I am. An American western Candide! Made an empathetic heart, sharp satire, and brutal honesty! Yes!! Pretty strictly satirical in one of those mirthless-but-point-taken sort of ways. I did a lot of nodding, silent chuckling and sad smiling. Actually I found the movie to be largely sadder than it was laugh-funny. The brutality of white men - "the white man thinks everything is dead" - being the most hammered home message. Hoffman is at his best here, playing his role through the decades of the character's life. (He's also psychically in ????????????young Dustin Hoffman shape. All about that hair.) I appreciated how his voice became accented only when talking to fellow white men. I appreciated the tenderness the Native American characters were given in general, that's really where the 'revisionism' comes in more than anything else. I also appreciated that silent ending that really gave away the films true intentions- the irreprable sadness of a last man standing.

    I wasn't expecting to like this so much for some reason but here I am. An American western Candide! Made an empathetic heart, sharp satire, and brutal honesty! Yes!! Pretty strictly satirical in one of those mirthless-but-point-taken sort of ways. I did a lot of nodding, silent chuckling and sad smiling. Actually I found the movie to be largely sadder than it was laugh-funny. The brutality of white men - "the white man thinks everything is dead" - being the most hammered home message. Hoffman is at his best here, playing his role through the decades of the character's life. (He's also psychically in ????????????young Dustin Hoffman shape. All about that hair.) I appreciated how his voice became accented only when talking to fellow white men. I appreciated the tenderness the Native American characters were given in general, that's really where the 'revisionism' comes in more than anything else. I also appreciated that silent ending that really gave away the films true intentions- the irreprable sadness of a last man standing.

  • Jul 08, 2017

    Enjoyable watch and maintains its original charm

    Enjoyable watch and maintains its original charm