Little Big Man Reviews

  • Jan 18, 2020

    Not as good as source material. Hoffman is a terrible actor in this movie. Atrocious

    Not as good as source material. Hoffman is a terrible actor in this movie. Atrocious

  • Dec 11, 2019

    A truly fantastic movie and one of the best all time movies. Get the popcorn ready and ready for a fantastic adventure in life. Listen to the only survivor of the Little Big Horn tell his life story which is like 4 or 5 lives. Great adventure, humor and emotional moments. Really shows the sides of both Indians and the white man during the Indian wars. It's one of those movies where they left nothing out. No doubt a perfect addition to any movie collection.

    A truly fantastic movie and one of the best all time movies. Get the popcorn ready and ready for a fantastic adventure in life. Listen to the only survivor of the Little Big Horn tell his life story which is like 4 or 5 lives. Great adventure, humor and emotional moments. Really shows the sides of both Indians and the white man during the Indian wars. It's one of those movies where they left nothing out. No doubt a perfect addition to any movie collection.

  • Nov 23, 2019

    Between 2 and 2.5 stars. Not funny enough to continue watching after a while. It is an attempt to describe West through a series of satyrical sketches, connected somehow through Dustin Hoffman, who looks as dull as twisted. Faye Dunaway makes a delicious character.

    Between 2 and 2.5 stars. Not funny enough to continue watching after a while. It is an attempt to describe West through a series of satyrical sketches, connected somehow through Dustin Hoffman, who looks as dull as twisted. Faye Dunaway makes a delicious character.

  • Oct 29, 2019

    Excellent after 49 years. Best movie I ever seen.

    Excellent after 49 years. Best movie I ever seen.

  • Aug 02, 2019

    A must see, I have been watching this movie every few years since 1970. A real classic. Great cast, great acting, great movie.

    A must see, I have been watching this movie every few years since 1970. A real classic. Great cast, great acting, great movie.

  • Apr 19, 2019

    Just fun! My wife and I have gone back to watch this a few times.

    Just fun! My wife and I have gone back to watch this a few times.

  • Jan 26, 2019

    The best Western movie ever made!

    The best Western movie ever made!

  • Jan 15, 2019

    this is an alright movie but ive seen about 500 westerns so far and there's thousands more to watch. why did they make so many?

    this is an alright movie but ive seen about 500 westerns so far and there's thousands more to watch. why did they make so many?

  • Dec 09, 2018

    Awesome. They don't make them like this anymore.

    Awesome. They don't make them like this anymore.

  • Mar 11, 2018

    My mother once told me that Little Big Man was one of her favorite movies. I remember her saying that the 1960s were a very cynical decade but that the 1970s cinema seemed to get back its heart. When I first saw Little Big Man I remember scoffing at it--what the filmmakers thought it was supposed to be. A drama? A comedy? A satire of history? Something self important or not important at all? Perhaps I didn't appreciate it back then, but what I take from the movie now is that it's a shady version of the truth--like all history is--and it's as funny and disturbing as real life can be. The movie tells the story of Jack Crabb (played subtly brilliant by a young Dustin Hoffman), a white man who grew up with American Indians and then later joined the white culture of late 1800s America. His unique upbringing allowed him to move back and forth into two different worlds, two different extreme cultures. Both cultures had altogether different values but the same apparent life dissatisfaction, not to mention an unreserved hatred of one another. Not only did I personally relate to the protagonist's strange dilemma but I also saw it as a metaphor for the different perspectives we we are arbitrarily born into in life. Everything we take for granted, everything we believe but haven't actually learned. Perhaps the film, like the novel it was based on, is a testament to neutrality, pacifism and non-violent resistance. It may well be the antithesis of most 1970s films, which were hard anti-establishment and pro-Democratic. Little Big Man was actually one of the very first films to depict Native American sympathetically, since in years past conservative filmmakers painted them as "savages". But somehow, as I watched the story of Jack Crabb come and go, as uneventful in the stream of time as it was truly unique to behold, I couldn't help but wonder if it truly is the definitive post-patriotic meditational experiment. In an age of Right vs Left war that never really ends, isn't the only winner the one who lives to tell the story of the bloodshed?

    My mother once told me that Little Big Man was one of her favorite movies. I remember her saying that the 1960s were a very cynical decade but that the 1970s cinema seemed to get back its heart. When I first saw Little Big Man I remember scoffing at it--what the filmmakers thought it was supposed to be. A drama? A comedy? A satire of history? Something self important or not important at all? Perhaps I didn't appreciate it back then, but what I take from the movie now is that it's a shady version of the truth--like all history is--and it's as funny and disturbing as real life can be. The movie tells the story of Jack Crabb (played subtly brilliant by a young Dustin Hoffman), a white man who grew up with American Indians and then later joined the white culture of late 1800s America. His unique upbringing allowed him to move back and forth into two different worlds, two different extreme cultures. Both cultures had altogether different values but the same apparent life dissatisfaction, not to mention an unreserved hatred of one another. Not only did I personally relate to the protagonist's strange dilemma but I also saw it as a metaphor for the different perspectives we we are arbitrarily born into in life. Everything we take for granted, everything we believe but haven't actually learned. Perhaps the film, like the novel it was based on, is a testament to neutrality, pacifism and non-violent resistance. It may well be the antithesis of most 1970s films, which were hard anti-establishment and pro-Democratic. Little Big Man was actually one of the very first films to depict Native American sympathetically, since in years past conservative filmmakers painted them as "savages". But somehow, as I watched the story of Jack Crabb come and go, as uneventful in the stream of time as it was truly unique to behold, I couldn't help but wonder if it truly is the definitive post-patriotic meditational experiment. In an age of Right vs Left war that never really ends, isn't the only winner the one who lives to tell the story of the bloodshed?