Maudie Reviews

  • 6d ago

    Superb acting, explores art, disability, family co-dependence and patriarchal society.

    Superb acting, explores art, disability, family co-dependence and patriarchal society.

  • Oct 30, 2020

    I thought of the movie as a life told on screen with so much of serenity and asthetics in there that I could float, dive, drown and surrender to the script, to it's characters, to the humbleness and to the honest efforts put in by the team, all for the love of life, for the love of art. Soaked in the goodness of this one, amply so. :)

    I thought of the movie as a life told on screen with so much of serenity and asthetics in there that I could float, dive, drown and surrender to the script, to it's characters, to the humbleness and to the honest efforts put in by the team, all for the love of life, for the love of art. Soaked in the goodness of this one, amply so. :)

  • Oct 28, 2020

    This movie is for adults who have a heart and feel movies that are true life. This story was set in the Canadian winter with few people and a small population. It shows us that life is a mixed bag, and fate happens when it happens. Such a beautiful story and I highly recommend it

    This movie is for adults who have a heart and feel movies that are true life. This story was set in the Canadian winter with few people and a small population. It shows us that life is a mixed bag, and fate happens when it happens. Such a beautiful story and I highly recommend it

  • Oct 26, 2020

    a deep, heart-breaking, perfect drama

    a deep, heart-breaking, perfect drama

  • Oct 17, 2020

    I've always loved Sally Hawkins' acting. Maudie stirs up a lot of emotions

    I've always loved Sally Hawkins' acting. Maudie stirs up a lot of emotions

  • Sep 27, 2020

    An earnest and serene look at a troubled, yet content life. Aisling Walsh's indie romance drama Maudie (2016) is a riveting and grounded approach to a biopic on Canadian folk artist Maud Lewis. Walsh's direction is tender with sympathy for Maud's petite frame, arthritis suffering, spousal abuse, delicate emotional fragility alongside a clear admiration for her genuine artistry and effortless optimism in the face of great adversity. Walsh proves she is a great Irish director for this Canadian and Irish crossover picture of immense grace and empathy towards a remarkably brave woman and truly earnest painter, who just loved to paint. Sally Hawkins is a dreamy revelation of adorable looks that capture Maud's shy presence and daydreaming persona. Her hurt expressions, eyes, and trembling voice really invoke Maud's personality with a pleasant positivity and gleeful taunts at times. I was particularly impressed by the way Hawkins holds her hands and painstakingly changed her walking pattern to imitate Maud's physical suffering from Arthritis, while her facial acting and body language convey Maud's inner feelings and desires. Hawkins is already a legendary actress in my book and Maudie may be her greatest dramatic acting role. She is mature, yet playful as well as tender and touching as Maud Lewis in Maudie. Hawkin's delicate frame and shaking figure really match Maud's and her empathetic acting just destroys you while watching Maudie. Ethan Hawke proves he is a dramatic actor to contend with as the fearsomely toxic and distantly indifferent Everett Lewis. You'd think Hawke would have softened up the man, but he portrays Everett as stubborn, mean, disagreeable, selfish, manipulative, and brutal. Hawke is so fascinating with his subtle facial expressions and cold body language that it's amazing how he slowly changes and develops Everett into a sympathetic figure. He clearly shows Everett loving Maud with a passion of his own style. Their relationship is toxic, but it seems like Maud and Everett had a nice life together. Ethan Hawke and Sally Hawkins have nice compatible chemistry on screen. They look like a real couple here in Maudie. I'll always appreciate Ethan Hawke's commitment to picking indie roles with authenticity instead of only blockbusters with no heart. Gabrielle Rose is unthinkably cruel and disgusting as Maud's viscerally mean Aunt Ida. Billy MacLellan is nice as Everett's fishing friend Frank. Zachary Bennett is excellent as Maud's greedy brother Charles. Kari Matchett is so sweet and genuine as Sandra. I really enjoyed her supporting role in Maudie for her encouraging attitude and kind understanding. Aisling Walsh's Maudie touched me so deeply, I bought an art print of Maud Lewis' "Children Skiing" that I found nostalgic and cute with sincere warmth for a Winter scene. I loved Maudie. I think most viewers will find it harrowing, but emotionally rewarding for how honest a picture it is at heart. Maudie feels natural thanks to Aisling Walsh's indie organic direction and I'm so grateful that there are still auteurs out there blooming in the flower fields of independent cinema. Writer Sherry White doesn't shy away from Maud's troubles and anxieties as well as her struggle to survive among able-bodied people. You get a real feel for her daily life and inner feelings. White's writing is realistic and centered around Maud Lewis' feelings as a woman left isolated to fend for herself, only to find love in the most abrasively cold, cruel, and even abusive husband. Sherry White beautifully depicts Maud' coming out of her shell to defend herself from her toxic masculinity plagued husband in the early 1900's until their characters develop into a loving marriage with an understanding of their flaws. It's a humanist and pragmatic movie that hits so hard because of White's sincere care in her precise dialogue. Walsh's direction is truly phenomenally heartfelt and serene with the Newfoundland backdrop to represent Nova Scotia's Wintery feel. John Hand's minimalist production design recreates Maud Lewis' infamously small home with all her quaint paintings. The cramped space feels suffocating, while her bright art with vibrant colors paints a vivid image of her shining imagination juxtaposed to this dreary abode. Dara Hand's set decoration all looks like Maud Lewis' home with old world furniture and knick knacks alongside her cheery paintings. Stephen O'Connell's editing is so stylish and helps you focus on the beautiful framing in Maudie. All the cuts from close-up intimate shots straight to far wide shots is really breathtaking. O'Connell's cuts keep Maudie at a quick pace for a serious biographical drama at an engrossing 115 minutes long. Guy Godfree's cinematography is lovely like watching the Sun rise on an Autumn morning or a cool breeze blow by your face on a Winter afternoon. His shot choices are either ultra zoomed in close-ups for the intimate conversations or far wide shots with cute framing to depict Nova Scotia as a harsh, yet beautiful environment to live in back then. Michael Timmins' score is so carefully composed with a gentle soundscape building slowly. Maudie's music is a tranquil blend of indie folk melodies and symphonic musings floating around for atmosphere. Lastly, Trysha Bakker's costumes look like old Canadian garments from Ethan Hawke's fisherman outfits or thread suit to Maudie's green and red coats. In conclusion, I highly recommend you watch the devastating emotional journey that is Maudie. Check out the real Maud Lewis' Canadian folk art too once you've finished the film!

    An earnest and serene look at a troubled, yet content life. Aisling Walsh's indie romance drama Maudie (2016) is a riveting and grounded approach to a biopic on Canadian folk artist Maud Lewis. Walsh's direction is tender with sympathy for Maud's petite frame, arthritis suffering, spousal abuse, delicate emotional fragility alongside a clear admiration for her genuine artistry and effortless optimism in the face of great adversity. Walsh proves she is a great Irish director for this Canadian and Irish crossover picture of immense grace and empathy towards a remarkably brave woman and truly earnest painter, who just loved to paint. Sally Hawkins is a dreamy revelation of adorable looks that capture Maud's shy presence and daydreaming persona. Her hurt expressions, eyes, and trembling voice really invoke Maud's personality with a pleasant positivity and gleeful taunts at times. I was particularly impressed by the way Hawkins holds her hands and painstakingly changed her walking pattern to imitate Maud's physical suffering from Arthritis, while her facial acting and body language convey Maud's inner feelings and desires. Hawkins is already a legendary actress in my book and Maudie may be her greatest dramatic acting role. She is mature, yet playful as well as tender and touching as Maud Lewis in Maudie. Hawkin's delicate frame and shaking figure really match Maud's and her empathetic acting just destroys you while watching Maudie. Ethan Hawke proves he is a dramatic actor to contend with as the fearsomely toxic and distantly indifferent Everett Lewis. You'd think Hawke would have softened up the man, but he portrays Everett as stubborn, mean, disagreeable, selfish, manipulative, and brutal. Hawke is so fascinating with his subtle facial expressions and cold body language that it's amazing how he slowly changes and develops Everett into a sympathetic figure. He clearly shows Everett loving Maud with a passion of his own style. Their relationship is toxic, but it seems like Maud and Everett had a nice life together. Ethan Hawke and Sally Hawkins have nice compatible chemistry on screen. They look like a real couple here in Maudie. I'll always appreciate Ethan Hawke's commitment to picking indie roles with authenticity instead of only blockbusters with no heart. Gabrielle Rose is unthinkably cruel and disgusting as Maud's viscerally mean Aunt Ida. Billy MacLellan is nice as Everett's fishing friend Frank. Zachary Bennett is excellent as Maud's greedy brother Charles. Kari Matchett is so sweet and genuine as Sandra. I really enjoyed her supporting role in Maudie for her encouraging attitude and kind understanding. Aisling Walsh's Maudie touched me so deeply, I bought an art print of Maud Lewis' "Children Skiing" that I found nostalgic and cute with sincere warmth for a Winter scene. I loved Maudie. I think most viewers will find it harrowing, but emotionally rewarding for how honest a picture it is at heart. Maudie feels natural thanks to Aisling Walsh's indie organic direction and I'm so grateful that there are still auteurs out there blooming in the flower fields of independent cinema. Writer Sherry White doesn't shy away from Maud's troubles and anxieties as well as her struggle to survive among able-bodied people. You get a real feel for her daily life and inner feelings. White's writing is realistic and centered around Maud Lewis' feelings as a woman left isolated to fend for herself, only to find love in the most abrasively cold, cruel, and even abusive husband. Sherry White beautifully depicts Maud' coming out of her shell to defend herself from her toxic masculinity plagued husband in the early 1900's until their characters develop into a loving marriage with an understanding of their flaws. It's a humanist and pragmatic movie that hits so hard because of White's sincere care in her precise dialogue. Walsh's direction is truly phenomenally heartfelt and serene with the Newfoundland backdrop to represent Nova Scotia's Wintery feel. John Hand's minimalist production design recreates Maud Lewis' infamously small home with all her quaint paintings. The cramped space feels suffocating, while her bright art with vibrant colors paints a vivid image of her shining imagination juxtaposed to this dreary abode. Dara Hand's set decoration all looks like Maud Lewis' home with old world furniture and knick knacks alongside her cheery paintings. Stephen O'Connell's editing is so stylish and helps you focus on the beautiful framing in Maudie. All the cuts from close-up intimate shots straight to far wide shots is really breathtaking. O'Connell's cuts keep Maudie at a quick pace for a serious biographical drama at an engrossing 115 minutes long. Guy Godfree's cinematography is lovely like watching the Sun rise on an Autumn morning or a cool breeze blow by your face on a Winter afternoon. His shot choices are either ultra zoomed in close-ups for the intimate conversations or far wide shots with cute framing to depict Nova Scotia as a harsh, yet beautiful environment to live in back then. Michael Timmins' score is so carefully composed with a gentle soundscape building slowly. Maudie's music is a tranquil blend of indie folk melodies and symphonic musings floating around for atmosphere. Lastly, Trysha Bakker's costumes look like old Canadian garments from Ethan Hawke's fisherman outfits or thread suit to Maudie's green and red coats. In conclusion, I highly recommend you watch the devastating emotional journey that is Maudie. Check out the real Maud Lewis' Canadian folk art too once you've finished the film!

  • Sep 09, 2020

    Sally Hawkins' performance was superb, I have to accept. And I know it's a slow film and it's meant to be that, but I got real tired.

    Sally Hawkins' performance was superb, I have to accept. And I know it's a slow film and it's meant to be that, but I got real tired.

  • Aug 31, 2020

    I did enjoy the film. The story is captivating although might have some made up scenes but overall, you won't waste time watching it

    I did enjoy the film. The story is captivating although might have some made up scenes but overall, you won't waste time watching it

  • Aug 13, 2020

    This might not be the most original movie in the world but it is definitely a lovely one. Maud is a grown up woman with arthritis who is treated by her family as a child incapable of having any kind of responsabilities. Trying to move away from her aunt who is constantly controlling her, she starts to work as a house maid for Everett Lewis, a grumpy and lonely man that grew up in an orphanage and seems to have little reasons for joy in his life. From the beginning, it seems obvious that they will eventually fall for each other and have a relationship, with the grumpy being turned into a loving partner and the woman proving her value in spite of her physical challenges. The story unfolds not exactly as I initially thought: they do become a couple but his roughness and moments of violence seem to be much deeper to be broken that easily (a mix of fear of being let down with a need to feel important, in several moments he does not seem that different from some men and husbands we see nowadays) what shows an additional layer of the character, one that I did not expect for a movie I perceived as a total cliché at first. He does soften up a little with time but to me the process felt natural more than a breakthrough as sometimes happen in movies. Their love is trully beautiful, it feels real and, what is interesting, most of the time it is expressed without words. Their small actions and looks are able to say a lot, contributing to build a lovely story. Some of the events in the movie sometimes feel a little out of place such as the woman who starts supporting her paintings and the unfolding of the story about Maud's baby who past away right after birth. This film was based on a true story so these might be events of the real Maudie Lewis but, while I do not feel they were completely lost in the story, maybe they could have been better inserted in the context.
Several love stories have been told in movies, some of them showing unlikely couples in which both people go through transformations and improve themselves together. While this movie is not materially different from these several others, the real and beautiful relationship created in this film makes it stand out. A good and touching love story.

    This might not be the most original movie in the world but it is definitely a lovely one. Maud is a grown up woman with arthritis who is treated by her family as a child incapable of having any kind of responsabilities. Trying to move away from her aunt who is constantly controlling her, she starts to work as a house maid for Everett Lewis, a grumpy and lonely man that grew up in an orphanage and seems to have little reasons for joy in his life. From the beginning, it seems obvious that they will eventually fall for each other and have a relationship, with the grumpy being turned into a loving partner and the woman proving her value in spite of her physical challenges. The story unfolds not exactly as I initially thought: they do become a couple but his roughness and moments of violence seem to be much deeper to be broken that easily (a mix of fear of being let down with a need to feel important, in several moments he does not seem that different from some men and husbands we see nowadays) what shows an additional layer of the character, one that I did not expect for a movie I perceived as a total cliché at first. He does soften up a little with time but to me the process felt natural more than a breakthrough as sometimes happen in movies. Their love is trully beautiful, it feels real and, what is interesting, most of the time it is expressed without words. Their small actions and looks are able to say a lot, contributing to build a lovely story. Some of the events in the movie sometimes feel a little out of place such as the woman who starts supporting her paintings and the unfolding of the story about Maud's baby who past away right after birth. This film was based on a true story so these might be events of the real Maudie Lewis but, while I do not feel they were completely lost in the story, maybe they could have been better inserted in the context.
Several love stories have been told in movies, some of them showing unlikely couples in which both people go through transformations and improve themselves together. While this movie is not materially different from these several others, the real and beautiful relationship created in this film makes it stand out. A good and touching love story.

  • Jul 26, 2020

    Tender Maud, brittle Everett, stellar performance by both, but Hawkins is amazing!

    Tender Maud, brittle Everett, stellar performance by both, but Hawkins is amazing!