Mom and Dad (2018) - Rotten Tomatoes

Mom and Dad (2018)

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AUDIENCE SCORE

Critic Consensus: Mom and Dad's gonzo premise serves as an effective springboard for a wickedly dark, bloody comedy - and an appropriately over-the-top performance from Nicolas Cage.

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Movie Info

A strange disorder suddenly causes parents to violently turn against their own children, forcing a suburban teen (Anne Winters) and her younger brother (Zackary Arthur) to evade the clutches of their now-deranged mom (Selma Blair) and dad (Nicolas Cage). However, their situation gets even more complicated when their grandparents (Lance Henriksen and Marilyn Dodds Frank) show up for a visit. Written and directed by Brian Taylor (Crank, Gamer).

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Cast

Nicolas Cage
as Brent Ryan
Selma Blair
as Kendall Ryan
Anne Winters
as Carly Ryan
Zackary Arthur
as Josh Ryan
Joseph D. Reitman
as Homeroom Teacher
Angie Willmott
as Zumba Dancer
Katie Stewart
as Student/Runner
Ricardo Santos
as Police Officer
Dale Miller
as Gym Teacher
Michael Yurchak
as Dad in Pool
Ellen Marguerite Cullivan
as Coffee Shop Patron/Medical Professional
James Tackett
as Crazed Father
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Critic Reviews for Mom and Dad

All Critics (124) | Top Critics (23)

Granted, the delivery's as shrill as a banshee stepping on a Lego brick, but here's a film with something to say.

March 5, 2018 | Rating: 3/5 | Full Review…
Top Critic

Nicolas Cage does crazy like no one else, but his descent into insanity here - not too far from how his character acts at the beginning of the film, really - can't elevate Taylor's juvenile take on adulthood.

February 23, 2018 | Rating: 1.5/4 | Full Review…

It's a madly satisfying mélange of suspense and comedy, though perhaps not recommended for family viewing.

February 22, 2018 | Rating: 3.5/4 | Full Review…

A gleefully trashy horror comedy.

February 5, 2018 | Full Review…
Top Critic

With an agonizing rupture of craft and common sense, it showcases a performance of screaming, over-the-top hysteria by Nicolas Cage that must be seen to be fully believed, but that is not a recommendation.

January 31, 2018 | Rating: 0/4 | Full Review…
Top Critic

The central joke of the film is that the plague only exacerbates violent feelings that parents already feel for their children. Taylor finds enough ways to tell that joke to sustain interest the remaining hour of the film.

January 25, 2018 | Full Review…

Audience Reviews for Mom and Dad

½

It's dumb as Hell and probably only got created to facilitate Nic Cage meeting his freakout quota and also what was that ending? But shit, I've had way worse times with a movie. Probably less cathartic to someone who actually likes children or has a healthy relationship with their parents, but for me and mine? Mom and Dad weren't half bad.

Gimly M.
Gimly M.

Super Reviewer

The appeal of the indie thriller Mom and Dad is its frenetic, gonzo, absurdist spirit that accelerates into delicious dark comedy with a maniacal glee seldom seen in movies. The nature of the movie and its bloody violence will put off many viewers; however, if you have a healthy appetite for the bizarre and tonally incongruous, then Mom and Dad will serve as a thrilling and hilarious treat. The Ryan family, father Brett (Nicolas Cage), mother Kendall (Selma Blair), teen daughter Carly (Ann Winters), and young son Josh (Zackary Arthur), are a typical suburban family with their share of secrets and antipathy. It's a normal day until it isn't. While at school, a mob of parents forms to collect their children. A rumor of a terrorist strike has circulated widely. But when the parents get close to their children they viciously harm them. It seems someone or something has flipped that parental instinct to protect one's child at all costs. Now the urge is to kill one's young. Carly and her friends escape the school mob and have to survive their homicidal parental units. I didn't realize it while watching but it became obvious in hindsight that this was the fodder of one of the debased, juvenile, and altogether hyperactive minds from the Crank movies, a series best described as debased, juvenile, and hyperactive. Brain Taylor takes a Twilight Zone premise and shoots it full of adrenaline and mescaline and whatever else was lying around on the ground. The action gets going in a relatively efficient fashion, establishing our family unit, and then setting them up for a collision course. From the 45-minute mark onward, it becomes more a self-contained thriller inside the family home, pitting our kids against their homicidal elders. It reminded me a tad of Don't Breathe in its ability to set up a playing field and have its characters find organic ways to get into trouble, escape it, and get into worse trouble. It's a series of moving pieces that feel elegantly arranged on the playing field. It keeps the movie barreling forward while still finding room for surprises and payoffs, including a glorious late Act Three payoff that I had long ago forgotten about its setup. It's not quite dues ex machina because there's more to come after, but it made me so happy. This is a movie that strangles the concept of tone, and yet it decidedly knows what points to hit up the darker comedy, what moments need more drawn out suspense, and what moments can straddle the difference. The build-up of dread can be beautifully applied and then turned for laughs. Take for instance a moment when a teen girl comes home and notices an open blender with margarita mix, implying her mother is home. Just as a signifier of terror, it's kind of fun, but then she leans closer and reaches into the open blender, her hand picking the blades. We're leaning in, waiting for the blender to turn on all of a sudden, and then... she walks away, and the moment passes. Then we laugh to ourselves about how something so ordinary was turned around to be menacing. Taylor finds other little moments like this to assure the audience he's thought through the premise and found ways to properly develop it to its potential. I was covering my face at parts in tense anticipation and I was cackling to myself at other times. Cage (Snowden) is one of the few actors that seems to get exponentially more compelling to watch the nuttier he acts, and his crackpot zeal can elevate bad movies into something approaching unintended hilarity, like 2006's woeful Wicker Man remake. There are few actors that go for broke regardless of how silly they eventually come across. In the wrong hands, this is an attribute that can betray Cage's efforts and sink a movie. In the right hands, like Taylor's, it provides the spark of madness needed to push a movie into another level of irascibility. Cage finds humor in the strangest of places, and it's not a derisive sort of humor but more a genuine delighted bafflement at the character. If you love crazy Cage, you'll have plenty to love in Mom and Dad. Blair (Hellboy 2) is the more restrained parent while still getting scenes to cut loose. She's having terrific fun getting to play bad. When she's teamed with Cage, they form a darkly funny couple bonding over their shared intent for murder. It becomes an oddball romantic comedy in the darkest sense. Blair also impresses in her scenes of dramatic response. She's one of the last parental figures to succumb to the hysteria, so we get to witness her process the shock and confusion of the day. There's a great scene where she's present in a hospital birthing room. Blair scrambles to save the newborn and try to understand what is happening, and it's a personal kind of fear and betrayal that registers. One of the more surprising aspects of Mom and Dad was how it's able to build the parents as characters in clever and genuinely sincere ways. This is a crazy movie, and that's its main appeal, but it can also find room to take things seriously. Taylor will momentarily pause the action to insert choice flashbacks that are enjoyable little asides, monologues that provide texture to the world and the characters. The flashback relating to a pool table's demise opens up an entire analysis of a rocky marriage, a middle-aged man raging against his life's mediocrity and the faded glory and promise of his youth, and the despair of losing your sense of self through parenthood. It builds and builds and allows the actors to unload. It doesn't serve as significant a narrative point as other character-based flashbacks setting up ironic convergences. It's just Brett and Kendall being able to voice their insecurities and disappointments. It's about this point where the movie positions both as unswayable evil forces, so giving them a chance to come across like genuine human beings before they're kill-crazy cartoons is unexpected and effective. I know I'm having a great time with a movie when the worst thing about it is the last few seconds. Mom and Dad just sort of ends. It almost feels like there was some kind of editing accident and you may turn and say, "Wait, is that it?" I didn't want Mom and Dad to end. This is a raucous dark comedy with an anarchic spirit but a strong sense of pacing, tone, and structure, layering in surprises and escalations dutifully while still finding equitable space to better shade the characters. If you're looking for a risky dark comedy that will make you feel a tad crazier for watching, give Mom and Dad a whirl. This is the kind of movie you might hate yourself for loving. Nate's Grade: B+

Nate Zoebl
Nate Zoebl

Super Reviewer

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