Sorority Row Reviews

  • Aug 13, 2019

    A remake of a pretty decent 80's slasher. This movie completely misses the mark on humour, thrills and horror. The acting is good apart from that chic from The Hills (why?). The dialogue was horrible and that twist ending was also a huge let down. Give this Sorority a miss.

    A remake of a pretty decent 80's slasher. This movie completely misses the mark on humour, thrills and horror. The acting is good apart from that chic from The Hills (why?). The dialogue was horrible and that twist ending was also a huge let down. Give this Sorority a miss.

  • May 13, 2019

    Mindless slasher film with bad acting and unlikable characters that you really didn't mind when they got killed off. Kind of rooting for the killer in this one.

    Mindless slasher film with bad acting and unlikable characters that you really didn't mind when they got killed off. Kind of rooting for the killer in this one.

  • May 07, 2019

    Great remake. The one liners are hilarious. The ending is a shocker. Well acted great horror/comedy. Leah Pipes steals the movie.

    Great remake. The one liners are hilarious. The ending is a shocker. Well acted great horror/comedy. Leah Pipes steals the movie.

  • Dec 25, 2018

    A great time! Have seen five times and still not old.

    A great time! Have seen five times and still not old.

  • Aug 11, 2018

    While it certainly doesn't carry through to the boneheaded twist and final act, Sorority Row has a surprising amount of wit to go along with the gleeful violence.

    While it certainly doesn't carry through to the boneheaded twist and final act, Sorority Row has a surprising amount of wit to go along with the gleeful violence.

  • Jul 09, 2018

    A slasher runaround that's pointless, ineffective, and irony-free, filled with unlikeable characters and uninspired death scenes. It's sad to see the great Carrie Fisher in the middle of this mess - her scenes as a sassy housemistress with a shotgun can do nothing to save it.

    A slasher runaround that's pointless, ineffective, and irony-free, filled with unlikeable characters and uninspired death scenes. It's sad to see the great Carrie Fisher in the middle of this mess - her scenes as a sassy housemistress with a shotgun can do nothing to save it.

  • Apr 24, 2017

    It's not fantastic but I found it fun and enjoyable regardless. 2.5 stars

    It's not fantastic but I found it fun and enjoyable regardless. 2.5 stars

  • Feb 23, 2017

    All things considered, it could have been a lot worse.

    All things considered, it could have been a lot worse.

  • Nov 02, 2016

    Surprisingly funny remake of The House on Sorority Row. The standout here is Leah Pipes and queen bee, Jessica. Her one liners and bitchy attitude keep this fairly by the numbers slasher afloat. The last 10 minutes or so are a giant misfire, but there are quite a few fun moments before that. It's never very scary or even suspenseful, but the cast is above average for a film like this and there's a few great zingers (usually delivered by Pipes).

    Surprisingly funny remake of The House on Sorority Row. The standout here is Leah Pipes and queen bee, Jessica. Her one liners and bitchy attitude keep this fairly by the numbers slasher afloat. The last 10 minutes or so are a giant misfire, but there are quite a few fun moments before that. It's never very scary or even suspenseful, but the cast is above average for a film like this and there's a few great zingers (usually delivered by Pipes).

  • Oct 04, 2016

    In general, Sorority Row is an outside film for its greatness, but to analyse its excellence in-depth is to potentially just end up becoming confused. The 2009 remake has symbolism, and style, but it doesn't have these things to the same level of clarity as Joe Chappelle's H6 (the theatrical cut), or The Terminator. The latter two films in their own ways dealt with symbolism and ideas that were more apparent, whereas Sorority Row's intelligence - while not technically inferior - is akin to the story, in that it's more of a buried factor. The way a work of art gets assessed usually depends on a cultural context; who is the viewer that's assessing the product? And while Sorority Row could possibly be criticised for forcing a critic to have to recognise this truth, I would argue that Sorority Row isn't a failed work of art, or incorrect. I'm not familiar with the original film, but like the theatrical H6 doesn't need Carpenter's source material, or The Force Awakens doesn't need the 1977 Star Wars, the 2009 update seems to be an expression that is independent. Funnier, though maybe not more self-aware than Wes Craven's Scream, Sorority Row is wicked humour - the kind of humour that's especially effective if the film is experienced in certain contexts. The deaths of characters are funny, but because of the general nature of the project: to satirise society. Even politicians are part of the story's fabric, clearly meant to imbue the film with serious outlooks on life. The symbolism of Sorority Row, again, is present but not overtly so. The confinement of settings makes it harder to deduce actual meaning, but the specific details that are shown are indeed meaningful: the way the main characters dress, always wearing silk clothing and high heels, seen holding bottles of alcohol and at times professional clothing. In this respect, Leah Pipes' Jessica is particularly symbolic: prior to meeting her boyfriend's politician father, Jessica is seen looking at herself in the mirror, checking that her appearance is immaculate. The movie's intelligence is at a pea here, showing the viewer the truth of conflation - Jessica shouldn't be the person looking into the mirror, but should be the person who another looks into the mirror for. Sorority Row is exploring the truth of traded identity. As a pure slasher thriller, Sorority Row doesn't disappoint; to the contrary, the precise level of excellence of the remake is its thriller aspect working in conjunction with its humour, yet either are able to remain separate. The hooded figure stalking the occupants of the sorority is as cool and as entertaining as Ghostface, or Michel Myers (naturally, Myers is the more meaningful type of figure, but the screen presence of the two is generally equal in quality). At the beginning, I referenced cultural contexts: to elaborate, I think what I'm getting at is that relative to actual intelligence, Sorority Row stands the test of time. The movie isn't dependent on culture, but is deserving of respect outside the paradigm of culture. Just like H6, and even films like Guilty as Sin and Saw II, I can't say I'm surprised by the low RT scores; Sorority Row is an unassuming work of art, hindered by its genre and by its literal synopsis. The general atmosphere of the film is to represent the sourness of society - to expose the hidden depravity that a sorority inevitably means. There is the possibility that I'm giving the remake more credit than it deserves, and like I said Sorority Row is no H6, but I don't think I am: the horror element can be interpreted as philosophical depth, but I'm confident in my belief that the philosophy is another presence, not a mistaken identity of the story's horror elements. Leah Pipes, Briana Evigan, Jamie Chung and Julian Morris are part of an expression, not limited to terror and traditional entertainment; the movie they're part of is as intelligent and as artistic as films like Rocky, Alien, Spectre and Taxi Driver. Sorority Row is a great film.

    In general, Sorority Row is an outside film for its greatness, but to analyse its excellence in-depth is to potentially just end up becoming confused. The 2009 remake has symbolism, and style, but it doesn't have these things to the same level of clarity as Joe Chappelle's H6 (the theatrical cut), or The Terminator. The latter two films in their own ways dealt with symbolism and ideas that were more apparent, whereas Sorority Row's intelligence - while not technically inferior - is akin to the story, in that it's more of a buried factor. The way a work of art gets assessed usually depends on a cultural context; who is the viewer that's assessing the product? And while Sorority Row could possibly be criticised for forcing a critic to have to recognise this truth, I would argue that Sorority Row isn't a failed work of art, or incorrect. I'm not familiar with the original film, but like the theatrical H6 doesn't need Carpenter's source material, or The Force Awakens doesn't need the 1977 Star Wars, the 2009 update seems to be an expression that is independent. Funnier, though maybe not more self-aware than Wes Craven's Scream, Sorority Row is wicked humour - the kind of humour that's especially effective if the film is experienced in certain contexts. The deaths of characters are funny, but because of the general nature of the project: to satirise society. Even politicians are part of the story's fabric, clearly meant to imbue the film with serious outlooks on life. The symbolism of Sorority Row, again, is present but not overtly so. The confinement of settings makes it harder to deduce actual meaning, but the specific details that are shown are indeed meaningful: the way the main characters dress, always wearing silk clothing and high heels, seen holding bottles of alcohol and at times professional clothing. In this respect, Leah Pipes' Jessica is particularly symbolic: prior to meeting her boyfriend's politician father, Jessica is seen looking at herself in the mirror, checking that her appearance is immaculate. The movie's intelligence is at a pea here, showing the viewer the truth of conflation - Jessica shouldn't be the person looking into the mirror, but should be the person who another looks into the mirror for. Sorority Row is exploring the truth of traded identity. As a pure slasher thriller, Sorority Row doesn't disappoint; to the contrary, the precise level of excellence of the remake is its thriller aspect working in conjunction with its humour, yet either are able to remain separate. The hooded figure stalking the occupants of the sorority is as cool and as entertaining as Ghostface, or Michel Myers (naturally, Myers is the more meaningful type of figure, but the screen presence of the two is generally equal in quality). At the beginning, I referenced cultural contexts: to elaborate, I think what I'm getting at is that relative to actual intelligence, Sorority Row stands the test of time. The movie isn't dependent on culture, but is deserving of respect outside the paradigm of culture. Just like H6, and even films like Guilty as Sin and Saw II, I can't say I'm surprised by the low RT scores; Sorority Row is an unassuming work of art, hindered by its genre and by its literal synopsis. The general atmosphere of the film is to represent the sourness of society - to expose the hidden depravity that a sorority inevitably means. There is the possibility that I'm giving the remake more credit than it deserves, and like I said Sorority Row is no H6, but I don't think I am: the horror element can be interpreted as philosophical depth, but I'm confident in my belief that the philosophy is another presence, not a mistaken identity of the story's horror elements. Leah Pipes, Briana Evigan, Jamie Chung and Julian Morris are part of an expression, not limited to terror and traditional entertainment; the movie they're part of is as intelligent and as artistic as films like Rocky, Alien, Spectre and Taxi Driver. Sorority Row is a great film.