The Boss Baby - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

The Boss Baby Reviews

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½ July 21, 2017
The Boss Baby's cuteness and humor is top quality. Alec Baldwin's voice fits in to the Boss Baby so well, it's so hard to imagine anyone else doing it The Boss Baby's wildly colored animation is dazzling. The Witt and job put into this film is done really well up to standards.
July 20, 2017
My daughter loved this movie. I thought it had a nice story
½ July 20, 2017
Let's Hope The Modest Success Does Not End In A Franchise Torment

Blessed be the only children who didn't have to stand the discomfort with the intrusion of a new sibling. Arguably, whatever the reason, jealousy ( the over sensitive response that arises when you see a threat over something of great personal value) emerges innately in humans: in a love relationship, at work, at school, in the family. On this familiar premise, "The Baby Boss" hits on the correct artery in order to delight both parents and children with a boyish thinking message that will convince by way of gags even the most skeptical and cerebral movie buff.

The feature film is "freely" inspired by the children's book published in 2010 by Marla Frazee, "freely" because development isn't pulled out from the pages verbatim, without talking about the unequal design of pictures. DreamWorks still keeps up, by reminding its contenders that they returned to take back the prerogative gained with animated audiovisual productions such as "Madagascar," "Shrek," "Kung Fu Panda," and latest "Trolls." It sets Tom McGrath as a filmmaker, the ideal director due to he's directed several movies of the company's orders, has also addressed with different content about childhood in his films in an underlying way. The script embraces high doses of gags and sketches that will look after mostly adults, this inclination is inductive when we find out that his writer, Michael McCullers, was the man who conceived the scripts of "Austin Powers" or "Baby Mama" and some episodes of American NBC'S "Saturday Night Live". Here slapstick and deadpan are mixed with the beautiful thoughts of a 7-year-old child to provide a compendium of occurrences touching deeply in the general public with great assertiveness. Sweeping aside the festive subject, the nuclear story line evokes productions that applied the same central narrative skeleton ("Look Who's Talking", "Littleman" or "Family Guy" series), a steadfast structure due to the warm welcome by the audience, the nonsense of the jocular pantomime of a baby working as an older man is the strongest fun producer. However, focusing on the plot and its progress, the mind of an infant is the device used to spark a succession of full positions of inventiveness, in addition, it manages to keep pace and dynamic firmly during the three acts, although the second section was prolonged more than it should be had. As a movie chiefly intended for children, lessons must be of great importance. At first, I had to deal with strong headaches about how they could present an appropriate closing to the story, as due to the passing of the situations seemed that it'd be getting an ending out of the ordinary, nonetheless, happy endings will always be. Beyond accepting the newcomer, the film reflects on teamwork, discrepancy-solving and a poorly worked labor aspect, however, children must receive a small explanation by their parents because of the "complexity" of lessons comprehension.Despite the fact that it weights the previous considerations, disrupts the impact of topics which aren't explicit on screen and suddenly the arduous search not to adopt the label of the commercial title is eradicated in full. The two cute main leads are engagingly designed, 7-year-old Tim assumes the figure of father and he has the responsibility to select the most circumspect decisions; the counterpoint is the baby, who with the tyrannical voice of Alec Baldwin achieves the execution of adorable effects. Undoubtedly, the title character is the spotlight, however, the real hero is Tim. Although the villain character is prorated between tender canine pets, campaign creator and his henchman, they diverge as soon as the baby appears on the screen.

While it falls apart in the formation of some approaches, embraces as a key piece its animation, which keeping in mind guidelines established by Pixar in terms of scrupulosity and concern for detail, loiters between the sweet and the effective, and this doesn't result in a handful of anodyne images exactly, based on two- dimensional lines, on the contrary, these ones' brilliance give rise to concentrate on textures and colors of the fabulous imagination, which from the first minutes run an interesting introduction. Tim's imaginary visions affect the presentation of them, which gamble with a range of designs and arts, beautifully devised by astonishing 3D (the effect with a drop of drool is maddening). The soundtrack isn't high, but it fits in each frame with certain effectiveness, from Beatles' altered melodies to OST, fit together in dramatic scenes or frantic car chases.

With a straight-to-the-point start and an emotional mature conclusion, Tom McGrath's "The Baby Boss" serves to introduce DreamWorks back into the audiovisual animated panorama, at the same time it expresses, from the perspective of a 7-year-old child, the affective parity that parents must have with the arrival of a new baby and the acceptance and understanding from the only child who should assimilate the arrival of a sibling. In addition, as a mass consumption movie, parents and children enjoy the two fabulous first parts of the feature film, however, it will be fatiguing to digest the last segment going back to a happy ending and the corresponding death of the villain. Perhaps, one day, a movie will break narrative projections of animation, meanwhile, let's enjoy the visual candies of this baby and his corporate mission. The diaper of animation is slowly getting dirty.
July 20, 2017
really funny great story all ads up
July 19, 2017
This is what happens when DreamWorks runs out of ideas. Switched it off after 20 minute.
Super Reviewer
July 19, 2017
Holy crap another movie adaptation of a children's book, picture book. This has to be one of the most bizarre premises I've come across for a children's book in some time, well at least until the end where all is somewhat explained.

So basically you've got this family of three, mum dad and their little boy Tim. Tim is as happy as can be with his life because he gets lots of love and attention from his parents. But things take a turn for the worst when his mum and dad have a baby. Much to Tim's amazement the baby arrives in a taxi, wears a suit, and he can talk. Almost straight away the baby throws Tim's life into disarray without his parents noticing.

It turns out that the baby (called 'the boss') is actually a baby but works for a mysterious company called Baby Corp. Here all babies have the minds of adults and work to keep infant love at a good level. Basically when people are born some are sent to their families but others that show a different state of mind are held back to work for Baby Corp, or something like that. These adult minded babies have to drink a special formula that keeps them as babies forever, if they stop they will grow old. Meanwhile, all other babies that go to their families, do retain memories of Baby Corp though their pacifier (dummy). But when that pacifier is eventually taken away (by the parents) they lose those memories. Utterly bizarre I know.

This premise raises many questions though. Does this mean that all the babies in Baby Corp are immortal? Surely it does because if they never stop drinking the formula they never grow older. Where is Baby Corp suppose to be exactly? When a baby is held back to work for Baby Corp, what happens with the family expecting that baby? Its also mentioned at one point by Tim that his parents told him where babies come from. But as Boss baby points out that is incorrect, so how come adults have never noticed the fact that no one gives birth? I guess you could say I'm reading into this too much, but these questions do kinda spring out at you.

Lets look at the villain. This guy used to be one of Baby Corps top babies, but apparently he was lactose intolerant so the special formula didn't work properly on him and he grew up. OK fair enough, but how come he can still remember Baby Corps? I thought babies lose that memory without their pacifier. Was it different for him because he used to be a CEO of Baby Corp or because he had been using the special formula or something??

I must admit the plot behind this movie was way more convoluted than I ever imagined. I just assumed it would be about a baby that acts like an adult behind its parents backs, kinda like an animated 'Look Who's Talking' type thing. I mean the casting of Alec Baldwin was a good move that's for sure. If there's anyone who has the perfect temperament for being a suit trapped in a babies body, its Alec Baldwin. Hell Baldwin is intimidating enough just by looking at his face, he constantly has that angry dad expression on his face, the scary boss with a short fuse. So spot on voice casting there.

Visually the movie is a treat but that's nothing new these days. But what I did find more interesting were the short imagination sequences that Tim has when he's playing. These sequences had a different, more simplified artistic style (kinda reminiscent of some old WB cartoons) with a much more vibrant, almost neon, colour palette. It was these sequences that I found to be way more intriguing and enjoyable than the rest of the actual movie. I especially liked the artistic style and colours used, really bold and striking. Other positive moments I can mention, a nice little 'Raiders of the Lost Ark' homage, and even more bizarrely a homage to the old classic kids board game [i]Mouse Trap[/i] (80's kids will know of this). Where on earth did that come from??

So yeah, its pretty to look at, the voice acting is solid and its amusing in places. I liked it when Tim was battling with the baby, from his parents point of view its seeing the duo merely playing, but its actually a battle. The sequence in the back garden with the pedal car is the perfect example of that. In general its a very average outing really (with a peculiar plot). A standard modern CGI kids flick with all the right boxes ticked.
½ July 17, 2017
Honestly not terrible at all
July 17, 2017
The Boss Baby is not a particularly good movie, but it's a harmless, passable entertainment best suited for kids. It is way too frenetic in its action and too goofy at times, but also surprisingly sweet and touching in its brotherly relationship. But it is just okay as the humor is ultimately lacking and the movie never really overcame its ridiculously silly and simplistic premise. Some plot points were interesting and some of its animation was even inventive, but most of it was your typical DreamWorks fare and nothing more than that.
July 16, 2017
A movie that I thought was surprisingly funny and worth my time
July 16, 2017
A bit too predictable.
½ July 15, 2017
This was a pretty good movie and my niece and nephew liked it.
½ July 15, 2017
In any movie where the bad guy says "Ha! Im not ticklish!" is the definition of a bad movie.
July 15, 2017
surprisingly I enjoyed it!!!! and I even cried
July 15, 2017
don't waste your time
½ July 15, 2017
So many things going wrong in this movie. I wont say it's not funny, because there is plenty of funny parts. But if you look a bit further, you'll se the objectification of pets and the commoditization of dangerous behaviours. Didn't like it.
½ July 15, 2017
From the slick and funny trailer, you'd be forgiven for thinking that you're going to be in for 97 minutes of laughter. Unfortunately, what you get is a film with an interesting premise, but which never really nails its story arc, peaking and troughing with exhausting banality in its second half, leading me to switch off and daydream about the bar, and my seven-year old to stand up and announce to the cinema (he's autistic, there's no filter) that he's bored. There are also no belly-laughs - only one joke soliciting a titter from the adults in the audience. Once again - watch it at home, where you can jump up and get snacks/check Twitter - but you'll be feeling out of pocket if you see it in the cinema.
½ July 14, 2017
Surprisingly enjoyed this film, only went cause the kid wanted to but it was well done with a unique storyline
July 13, 2017
Very Child Friendly Movie. I Loved It All. I Recommend All Ages To Watch. It Has Many Heartwarming Moments & Life Lessons That Anyone Could Comprehend & Learn From.
July 13, 2017
The Boss Baby: A big name line-up (Alec Baldwin, Steve Buscemi, Jimmy Kimmel, Lisa Kudrow), a few chuckles, and occasional glimmers of visual brilliance can't salvage this brainless, mediocre story that fails to capitalize on its one note joke and feels like it was written by a committee hooked on poop jokes. C-
July 13, 2017
Loved it, had me laughing and crying. Kids of all ages would get a kick out of it, some of the jokes made just for adults :)
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