Zabriskie Point Reviews

  • Dec 11, 2018

    30 minutes shorter and it'd had been a masterpiece.

    30 minutes shorter and it'd had been a masterpiece.

  • Carlos M Super Reviewer
    Oct 03, 2018

    What irritates me about this film is how pretentious it is, with Antonioni completely out of his league trying to make an anti-American, anti-establishment denouncement that never rings true and feels only silly, heavy-handed and overblown with its ridiculous sense of pacing.

    What irritates me about this film is how pretentious it is, with Antonioni completely out of his league trying to make an anti-American, anti-establishment denouncement that never rings true and feels only silly, heavy-handed and overblown with its ridiculous sense of pacing.

  • Aug 19, 2018

    While I didn't like the politics of this movie, Antonioni is still Antonioni.

    While I didn't like the politics of this movie, Antonioni is still Antonioni.

  • Jan 21, 2018

    What is Antonioni trying to express? Did he feel sorry for the American students, or think they got what they deserved? Nice soundtrack though.

    What is Antonioni trying to express? Did he feel sorry for the American students, or think they got what they deserved? Nice soundtrack though.

  • Oct 12, 2017

    Never mind the low-key performances and so-so script, the real star here is the eye-popping use of the pre-revision Panavision widescreen process; that and the great Pink Floyd/Grateful Dead (along with a host of others) score.

    Never mind the low-key performances and so-so script, the real star here is the eye-popping use of the pre-revision Panavision widescreen process; that and the great Pink Floyd/Grateful Dead (along with a host of others) score.

  • Sep 26, 2017

    Zabriskie Point is a decent film. It is about the chronicling of the counterculture of America. Mark Frechette and Daria Halprin give okay performances. The screenplay is a little slow in places. Michelangelo Antonioni did an alright job directing this movie. I liked this motion picture because of the drama and romance.

    Zabriskie Point is a decent film. It is about the chronicling of the counterculture of America. Mark Frechette and Daria Halprin give okay performances. The screenplay is a little slow in places. Michelangelo Antonioni did an alright job directing this movie. I liked this motion picture because of the drama and romance.

  • Sep 17, 2017

    a guy steals an airplane and uses it to pick up a chick in the desert. they make love and paint the plane and he flys it back and gets arrested. then she goes back home and blows up her parents house. a weird dreamlike movie

    a guy steals an airplane and uses it to pick up a chick in the desert. they make love and paint the plane and he flys it back and gets arrested. then she goes back home and blows up her parents house. a weird dreamlike movie

  • Sep 15, 2017

    In structure alone, Antonioni breaks convention by starting the film focused on Mark, introducing Daria later, and ending the film focused on her. A film of orgies - one violent between police and picketers, another psychosexual in a desert, and a final meditative summation of all the existential points Antonioni is making with this film. This incredibly explosive montage, set to Pink Floyd's Careful With That Axe Eugene, takes a chance at just throwing it all out there and hoping the audience will have an experience with it. All of our property, consumerism, the superficial and the necessities - it all just flails about as the music builds to a screaming crescendo. It starts off with multiple angles of a beautiful desert home, built into the rock, detonating. The experience we have leading into this is a young girl (Daria), who is into meditation and Native culture, feeling nature exploited by human civilization. This home is built on the backs of those who lost theirs. The maids who work here are colored women; Daria empathizes. She observes the sleek wooden structures juxtaposed to the natural environment surrounding it - rocks, cactuses, running water. Her youthful beauty also seems exploited by Rod Taylor's presumptuous position of power. The men are meeting about property development, how this land will continue to be built upon and profited, how they may even stumble upon gold. After hearing this, we cut to the exterior, and the expressionists explosions erupt. After enough angles on the home, it becomes abstract - a refrigerator explodes, we see meats and fruits and a box of cereal hovering in the air. Then there's beach towels and umbrellas, and anything else you can imagine buying, owning, consuming, as the literal gets lost and we go into a deep and deeper meditation. It's beautiful. Of course none of this is literally happening, Daria has been dreaming of it from a distance as she's already partially driven away from this place. She gets in her car and takes off as Roy Orbison takes us out with a gorgeous sunset. Antonioni beautifully explores the human relationship with nature in a way that is transcendent, allowing the audience to take hold of the experience and ponder many feelings and thoughts. The scene at Zabriske Point explores shapes, patters, desert vastness, these little animals called humans exploring the space with their bodies, full of vitality.

    In structure alone, Antonioni breaks convention by starting the film focused on Mark, introducing Daria later, and ending the film focused on her. A film of orgies - one violent between police and picketers, another psychosexual in a desert, and a final meditative summation of all the existential points Antonioni is making with this film. This incredibly explosive montage, set to Pink Floyd's Careful With That Axe Eugene, takes a chance at just throwing it all out there and hoping the audience will have an experience with it. All of our property, consumerism, the superficial and the necessities - it all just flails about as the music builds to a screaming crescendo. It starts off with multiple angles of a beautiful desert home, built into the rock, detonating. The experience we have leading into this is a young girl (Daria), who is into meditation and Native culture, feeling nature exploited by human civilization. This home is built on the backs of those who lost theirs. The maids who work here are colored women; Daria empathizes. She observes the sleek wooden structures juxtaposed to the natural environment surrounding it - rocks, cactuses, running water. Her youthful beauty also seems exploited by Rod Taylor's presumptuous position of power. The men are meeting about property development, how this land will continue to be built upon and profited, how they may even stumble upon gold. After hearing this, we cut to the exterior, and the expressionists explosions erupt. After enough angles on the home, it becomes abstract - a refrigerator explodes, we see meats and fruits and a box of cereal hovering in the air. Then there's beach towels and umbrellas, and anything else you can imagine buying, owning, consuming, as the literal gets lost and we go into a deep and deeper meditation. It's beautiful. Of course none of this is literally happening, Daria has been dreaming of it from a distance as she's already partially driven away from this place. She gets in her car and takes off as Roy Orbison takes us out with a gorgeous sunset. Antonioni beautifully explores the human relationship with nature in a way that is transcendent, allowing the audience to take hold of the experience and ponder many feelings and thoughts. The scene at Zabriske Point explores shapes, patters, desert vastness, these little animals called humans exploring the space with their bodies, full of vitality.

  • Jun 25, 2017

    Watching it now on TCM. Airplane theft was funny but the wanders almost aimlessly with no purpose for some or most of the time. It's sort of like I had made a movie about a couple of days of my life and somehow was a depressed person in the 60's. No joy. How did they talk all the well known actors to be in this movie? Movie has about 30 minutes left now, will finish review when it ends.Waited for Mark the airplane gets to be shot by police. No drama, no blood and no bullet holes in airplane. What? House blows up at end for some reason. Though I have to say that a lot of movies of that era seem to have a minimalist of emotions and I don't know why that was. ??... I did not like this movie. Maybe someone will have to explain how they spent $7M.

    Watching it now on TCM. Airplane theft was funny but the wanders almost aimlessly with no purpose for some or most of the time. It's sort of like I had made a movie about a couple of days of my life and somehow was a depressed person in the 60's. No joy. How did they talk all the well known actors to be in this movie? Movie has about 30 minutes left now, will finish review when it ends.Waited for Mark the airplane gets to be shot by police. No drama, no blood and no bullet holes in airplane. What? House blows up at end for some reason. Though I have to say that a lot of movies of that era seem to have a minimalist of emotions and I don't know why that was. ??... I did not like this movie. Maybe someone will have to explain how they spent $7M.

  • Apr 24, 2017

    Half of the film is excess fat, the other is brilliant Antonioni. The final sequence, as well noted, is brilliant. It's a competently produced criticism of modern America but lacking depth. The acting is very low-key.

    Half of the film is excess fat, the other is brilliant Antonioni. The final sequence, as well noted, is brilliant. It's a competently produced criticism of modern America but lacking depth. The acting is very low-key.