Law & Order: Season 2 (1991 - 1992)

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Season 2
Law & Order

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User Ratings: 6

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Episodes

Air date: Sep 19, 1991

Season Two of Law & Order begins on a shockingly tragic note, as Detective Sergeant Max Greevey is shot down and killed in front of his own home (former regular George Dzundza had already departed the series when this scene was filmed). In his grief, Greevey's partner Logan (Chris Noth) vows to track the murderer to the ends of the earth -- a promise complicated by his difficulty in adjusting to new partner Phil Cerreta (Paul Sorvino). Ultimately overstepping his bounds, Logan may ironically prevent the D.A.'s office from successfully prosecuting the killer. In addition to introducing Paul Sorvino to the cast, this episode also represents the first appearance of Catherine McCormack in the recurring role of police psychiatrist Dr. Elizabeth Olivet.

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Air date: Sep 24, 1991

A double homicide yields two likely suspects: Melanie Cullen (Shirley Knight), widow of the male victim, and Douglas Phillips (David Lansbury), the obsessive ex-boyfriend of the female victim. The key to the case ultimately rests in the hands of Melanie's son, James (Geoffrey Nauffts). Jerry Orbach, who would later join the series' regular cast as detective Lennie Briscoe, is here seen in the adversarial role of the Cullens' defense attorney, Frank Lehrman.

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Air date: Oct 1, 1991

A young aspiring actress is killed by a lethal drug overdose. At first glance, it seems the girl was driven to her death by her mother, the proverbial "stage mom from hell." But as the detectives and the D.A.'s office pursue the investigation, it becomes painfully clear that both mother and daughter are inextricably linked with the sleazy producer of porno films. This episode offers an interesting change-of-pace role for frequent Woody Allen co-star Tony Roberts.

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Air date: Oct 8, 1991

When a man is stabbed to death in front of a coffee shop, an unhinged "street person" named Lemonhead (Matthew Cowles) leads detectives Logan (Chris Noth) and Cerreta (Paul Sorvino) to the probable killer, a homeless man named Polesky (Stuart Rudin). Sure enough, the cops find the murder weapon in the Central Park clearing that Polesky calls "home." Unfortunately, the killer's prosecution may be stymied when the Defense argues that Logan and Cerreta didn't have a search warrant.

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Air date: Oct 22, 1991

The ongoing debate over parental rights in medical procedures comes to the forefront when a five-year-old girl dies from a relatively minor throat infection. The child's parents, Ted and Nancy Driscoll (Byron Jennings, Kaiulani Lee) are arrested, whereupon they argue that their religious beliefs compelled them to deny medical treatment for their daughter. Incidentally, the unfortunate youngster is played by an uncredited Michelle Trachtenberg, who later co-starred on the TV series Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

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Air date: Oct 29, 1991

After being mugged, pregnant legal secretary Amy Newhouse (Molly Price) loses her unborn baby. The police suspect that the mugging was not random, and that someone -- perhaps Amy, perhaps her lover Christopher Baylor (Reed Diamond), perhaps her boss David Alcott (Nicholas Surovy) -- wanted the child dead. The problem: Can the D.A.'s office argue that the killing of an unborn fetus qualify as a murder?

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Air date: Nov 5, 1991

The renovation of a Manhattan brownstone yields the skeletal remains of a young boy. Further investigation indicates that the unfortunate youngster disappeared without a trace in 1960. The case causes the boy's childhood friend Julie Atkinson (Mary Joan Negro) to suffer the anguish of reliving some horrible, long-repressed memories. This episode marked a reunion between series co-star Michael Moriarty and director Ed Sherin, who'd previously collaborated on Moriarty's debut film, My Old Man's Place (1972).

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Air date: Nov 12, 1991

College sophomore Andrea Fermi (Noelle Parker) claims she was gang-raped after attending a Halloween party at a boys' fraternity house. Anxious to bring those responsible to justice, Assistant D.A. Robinette (Richard Brooks) utilizes questionable tactics to nail a confession. This may prove to be the Prosecution's undoing -- and the rapacious college boys may well escape scot-free.

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Air date: Nov 19, 1991

The husband of high school teacher Jenna Kealey (Ashley Crow) is killed in what seems to be a hit-and-run accident. Eventually, however, it becomes obvious that the man was murdered, possibly as the result of a conspiracy between Jenna and Roy Pack Jr. (David Seaman), the teenaged student with whom she is having an affair. The D.A.'s office is in for a heap of frustration when Jenna claims that Roy was solely responsible for the killing -- and vice-versa.

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Air date: Nov 26, 1991

Fifty-three people die in a fire at a private Manhattan nightclub. Suspects include a disgruntled patron who was not allowed entry to the popular night-spot, and a rival club owner. But as the investigation proceeds, the trail of evidence leads to a particularly nasty green card scam, targeting illegal aliens. This episode is distinguished by its impressive supporting cast of Hispanic actors.

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Law & Order: Season 2 Photos

Tv Season Info

Dick Wolf's classic American procedural series "Law & Order" continues its saga of the NYPD homicide detectives who investigate crimes, and the District Attorneys office that prosecutes them, in series two. Returning this series are Det. Logan (Chris Noth), Capt. Cragen (Dann Florek), A.D.A.s Ben Stone (Michael Moriarty) and Paul Robinette (Richard Brooks), and DA Adam Schiff (Steven Hill), while newly arrived is Sgt. Phil Cerreta (Paul Sorvino). This series begins on a tense note, with an act of violence against one of the officers, and a subsequent NYPD investigation; meanwhile, Logan and Cerreta adjust to their new partnership. Stories this season include an investigation of a pornographer's ties to a starlet's overdose, a brownstone renovation that turns up the body of a boy who has been missing for decades, Stone's courtroom reunion with an old nemesis as he tries to pin multiple homicides on a hit man, the arrest of a slumlord whose policies may have killed an infant, and much more.

Critic Reviews for Law & Order Season 2

All Critics (2) | Top Critics (1)

The series that has made the smoothest transition with a new costar is Law & Order, whose quality has, if anything, improved in its second season.

Nov 28, 2018 | Rating: A- | Full Review…

Seriously, what else can we say to describe this show that hasn't already been said?

Apr 20, 2020 | Rating: 4.5/5 | Full Review…

Audience Reviews for Law & Order: Season 2

  • Jul 25, 2018
    Law & Order is one of my go-to shows to watch while sitting on the couch and vegging out. I've seen every episode multiple times, but I find the show comforting. That's what Law & Order is - comfort food. The episodes are formulaic, right down to the trademark opening scene - some unfortunate people have their Seinfeldian conversation interrupted by the discovery of a dead body. Few episodes stand out, but the standard of quality is high and almost every episode is at least passable, and, while the show never dives particularly deeply into the issues it showcases, the show's examination of different societal problems can provide some fuel for thought. Unfortunately, the series not infrequently makes procedural errors (although it is at least more careful about remaining at least superficially plausible than the spin-off SVU), so it may miseducate some people about the legal system - although the people who try to learn law from a police procedural/courtroom drama are at least partly to blame for this miseducation. Season 2 maintains the slightly grittier tone that differentiates the earlier seasons the latter seasons and takes place before the show's gradual slide toward sensationalism. It also has a decent cast. Michael Moriarty, with his distinctive soft voice, gives a good performance on the legal side, as does Richard Brooks. On the police procedural portion of the show, Chris Noth's Mike Logan is one of my favorite detectives of the franchise, just behind Lenny Briscoe and tied with Ed Green. Phil Cerreta, played by Paul Sorvino, replaces Max Greevey this season. I consider this a roughly equal exchange in terms of acting ability, although Cerreta's maturity plays well against Logan's hot headedness. If I had to pick a standout episode from this season, I would pick "Out of Control", not because the quality is higher, but because it explores an unfortunate facet of the legal system often overlooked by the franchise, namely that juries in sexual assault cases often blame the victim, especially if she wasn't totally monogamous. Overall, season 2 of Law & Order is roughly the same in quality as season 1.

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