Reviews

  • Nov 14, 2021

    A mother and daughter who don't see eye to eye, switch places in their lives for a day. Some of the situations that the two find themselves in are over exaggerated for comedic effect. For me this made the movie less engaging, as I felt the real world situations might have been more interesting. Barbara Harris, who plays the mother, and a young Jodie Foster, who plays the daughter, do a good job of playing another character when the two switch bodies. But, they didn't seem to play each other very well, just a different character. The father, played by John Astin, was a "male chauvinist pig", but that plot line really didn't resolve and he got his way most often. Maybe that was social commentary, I'm not sure. I also feel that since this was remade in the 1990's, that this version is too dated to connect with today's audience. If it sounds like something up your alley, then check it out.

    A mother and daughter who don't see eye to eye, switch places in their lives for a day. Some of the situations that the two find themselves in are over exaggerated for comedic effect. For me this made the movie less engaging, as I felt the real world situations might have been more interesting. Barbara Harris, who plays the mother, and a young Jodie Foster, who plays the daughter, do a good job of playing another character when the two switch bodies. But, they didn't seem to play each other very well, just a different character. The father, played by John Astin, was a "male chauvinist pig", but that plot line really didn't resolve and he got his way most often. Maybe that was social commentary, I'm not sure. I also feel that since this was remade in the 1990's, that this version is too dated to connect with today's audience. If it sounds like something up your alley, then check it out.

  • Aug 19, 2021

    I do not care for a lot of Disney movies especially ones that borrow from other Movies!!!

    I do not care for a lot of Disney movies especially ones that borrow from other Movies!!!

  • Jul 13, 2021

    Based on the 1972 novel by Mary Rodgers — who also wrote the screenplay — the magic that switches the mother and daughter in this movie is quite simple. In Friday the 13th, all you have tio do is say, "I wish I could switch places with her for just one day" and it happens. Actually, this whole thing reminds me of Goofy Minds the House, a 1977 Disney Wonderful World of Reading storybook that features the character Goofy and his wife switching jobs for one day and learning that they both have rough lives. That story was based on a Norwegian folktale and taught me that women were much stronger than men. Also — Goofy once had a wife named Mrs. Geef and Mrs. Goof, but now he's thought to be dating Clarabelle the Cow, so something happened at some point. Perhaps even odder, Goofy was once called Dippy Dawg. But I digress. Just as much as that story is part of my childhood, so is Freaky Friday, a movie that I know for a fact that I saw at the Spotlite 88 Drive-In in Beaver Falls, PA. Ellen Andrews (Barbara Harris) and her daughter Annabel (Jodie Foster) are constantly battling with one another until they switch places, which enables each of them to see life from the other side, connect better with other people and, of course, water ski. The cast of this movie is made up of people that a five year old me would see as big stars, like John Astin, Dick Can Patten, Charlene Tilton, Marc McClure and, of course, Boss Hogg. Strangely enough, George Lucas wanted Foster for the role of Princess Leia, but her mother wanted her to complete her contract to Disney. Disney can't seem to stop remaking this movie. And really, no one else can either, because it's the mother of body switch comedies, including 18 Again!, All of Me, Dream a Little Dream, Vice Versa and Freaky, a film which combines the Friday the 13th of this story with the slasher side of the holiday

    Based on the 1972 novel by Mary Rodgers — who also wrote the screenplay — the magic that switches the mother and daughter in this movie is quite simple. In Friday the 13th, all you have tio do is say, "I wish I could switch places with her for just one day" and it happens. Actually, this whole thing reminds me of Goofy Minds the House, a 1977 Disney Wonderful World of Reading storybook that features the character Goofy and his wife switching jobs for one day and learning that they both have rough lives. That story was based on a Norwegian folktale and taught me that women were much stronger than men. Also — Goofy once had a wife named Mrs. Geef and Mrs. Goof, but now he's thought to be dating Clarabelle the Cow, so something happened at some point. Perhaps even odder, Goofy was once called Dippy Dawg. But I digress. Just as much as that story is part of my childhood, so is Freaky Friday, a movie that I know for a fact that I saw at the Spotlite 88 Drive-In in Beaver Falls, PA. Ellen Andrews (Barbara Harris) and her daughter Annabel (Jodie Foster) are constantly battling with one another until they switch places, which enables each of them to see life from the other side, connect better with other people and, of course, water ski. The cast of this movie is made up of people that a five year old me would see as big stars, like John Astin, Dick Can Patten, Charlene Tilton, Marc McClure and, of course, Boss Hogg. Strangely enough, George Lucas wanted Foster for the role of Princess Leia, but her mother wanted her to complete her contract to Disney. Disney can't seem to stop remaking this movie. And really, no one else can either, because it's the mother of body switch comedies, including 18 Again!, All of Me, Dream a Little Dream, Vice Versa and Freaky, a film which combines the Friday the 13th of this story with the slasher side of the holiday

  • May 17, 2021

    As they say, women be swapping.

    As they say, women be swapping.

  • Sep 15, 2020

    Cheesy, cheap, low budget, family friendly, occasionally diverting Disney 70's fluff.

    Cheesy, cheap, low budget, family friendly, occasionally diverting Disney 70's fluff.

  • Jul 29, 2020

    It's a classic! Absolutely winning and adorable. Perfect for families. Barbara Harris reminds us why she was one of the most interesting leading ladies of the 1900s.

    It's a classic! Absolutely winning and adorable. Perfect for families. Barbara Harris reminds us why she was one of the most interesting leading ladies of the 1900s.

  • Jul 16, 2020

    It could have done a lot more with its premise (like the remake did) but the performances are a blast.

    It could have done a lot more with its premise (like the remake did) but the performances are a blast.

  • Jul 13, 2020

    Okay watch, probably won't watch again, and can't recommend. It was interesting to see a young Jodie Foster... While I appreciate this popularizing (I'm still not convinced it birthed) a trope of "body swapping", it seems very uninspired: as if they said, "Wouldn't it be great if a kid and a parent swapped?" and then just stopped coming up with ideas. It was honestly very jarring on both swaps, the latter being honestly confusing (despite having addressed it directly). The movie made me realize how difficult it would be to swap places and attempt to "be" that person without a shred of preparation. I'm sure that's a bad sign as I should be more entertained by the novelty or adversity of the situation, but no. It's not that its a bad movie, there's a lot going on, a lot of it decent, but it's very dated. Even the action in it is a little awkward, but I certainly see why people in 1976 would have been impressed with this. On the other hand, I don't imagine people were talking about it for very long. There is a lot of thought narration that occurs, which isn't very engaging, and most of the engaging humor is cheap physical humor of "what's going to go wrong this time" so you're not engaged very long and the impression doesn't hold. The part of the movie that is actually rather good is the substance of teaching everyone to appreciate everyone else in the family, but we really took "walk a mile in his shoes" to an extreme here. There are more palatable ways to express the concept, and more movies that use this trope. I honestly suggest the 2003 version over this one, it's just not very memorable.

    Okay watch, probably won't watch again, and can't recommend. It was interesting to see a young Jodie Foster... While I appreciate this popularizing (I'm still not convinced it birthed) a trope of "body swapping", it seems very uninspired: as if they said, "Wouldn't it be great if a kid and a parent swapped?" and then just stopped coming up with ideas. It was honestly very jarring on both swaps, the latter being honestly confusing (despite having addressed it directly). The movie made me realize how difficult it would be to swap places and attempt to "be" that person without a shred of preparation. I'm sure that's a bad sign as I should be more entertained by the novelty or adversity of the situation, but no. It's not that its a bad movie, there's a lot going on, a lot of it decent, but it's very dated. Even the action in it is a little awkward, but I certainly see why people in 1976 would have been impressed with this. On the other hand, I don't imagine people were talking about it for very long. There is a lot of thought narration that occurs, which isn't very engaging, and most of the engaging humor is cheap physical humor of "what's going to go wrong this time" so you're not engaged very long and the impression doesn't hold. The part of the movie that is actually rather good is the substance of teaching everyone to appreciate everyone else in the family, but we really took "walk a mile in his shoes" to an extreme here. There are more palatable ways to express the concept, and more movies that use this trope. I honestly suggest the 2003 version over this one, it's just not very memorable.

  • Jul 06, 2020

    The 2003 remake improved the storytelling, the humor, and the heart out of patience, after realizing how the 1976 original went pure random fantasy and welcome awkwardness. The live-action Disney family film, as a rambunctiously silly comedy, still delivered its main empathetic point after cartoonish laughs, whimsical opening sequence, and a stellar breakout performance for young Jodie Foster. (B)

    The 2003 remake improved the storytelling, the humor, and the heart out of patience, after realizing how the 1976 original went pure random fantasy and welcome awkwardness. The live-action Disney family film, as a rambunctiously silly comedy, still delivered its main empathetic point after cartoonish laughs, whimsical opening sequence, and a stellar breakout performance for young Jodie Foster. (B)

  • Jan 29, 2020

    Some of the elements seem lost in the film but it tops the cake in the end.

    Some of the elements seem lost in the film but it tops the cake in the end.