22 Bullets Reviews

  • Aug 15, 2019

    They killed the little dog, the bastards. You kill a nice little animal and I'm not only gonna kill them, but I'm gonna kill their wives, all their friends, and burn their damn houses down. There were too many silly moments and mistakes which a professional wouldn't make and a few clichés floating around but all in all it wasn't too bad.

    They killed the little dog, the bastards. You kill a nice little animal and I'm not only gonna kill them, but I'm gonna kill their wives, all their friends, and burn their damn houses down. There were too many silly moments and mistakes which a professional wouldn't make and a few clichés floating around but all in all it wasn't too bad.

  • Mar 30, 2018

    Good cinematography and bloody awful plot. The story is full of holes. And as Aron Sorkin said after our suspension of disbelieve is broken it's really hard to bring us back to enjoying the movie. 22 Bullets does few things that are so improbable that it's impossible to follow the story without a smirk on our face. First the recovery rate, secondly illogical choices of the protagonist (for example to send his child to school even though he asked his family to hide.), ridding a motorbike when he had struggles to walk just few days ago (plus it would be quite hard with a paralyzed hand). There is also a problem with sloppy make up department that forgot to draw his cheek scar near the end of the movie, also how is it possible to have no burn marks after being sproung down with boiling watter... To sum things up this movie was a waste of money especially since it has a lot of expensive looking scenes in it.

    Good cinematography and bloody awful plot. The story is full of holes. And as Aron Sorkin said after our suspension of disbelieve is broken it's really hard to bring us back to enjoying the movie. 22 Bullets does few things that are so improbable that it's impossible to follow the story without a smirk on our face. First the recovery rate, secondly illogical choices of the protagonist (for example to send his child to school even though he asked his family to hide.), ridding a motorbike when he had struggles to walk just few days ago (plus it would be quite hard with a paralyzed hand). There is also a problem with sloppy make up department that forgot to draw his cheek scar near the end of the movie, also how is it possible to have no burn marks after being sproung down with boiling watter... To sum things up this movie was a waste of money especially since it has a lot of expensive looking scenes in it.

  • May 20, 2017

    Enjoyable on DVD, but would be way disappointing if I paid box office prices. Bloody but surprises are a few too little, entertaining but sub-par on every level. Reno is always good, and a supporting cast is decent. Worth a view.

    Enjoyable on DVD, but would be way disappointing if I paid box office prices. Bloody but surprises are a few too little, entertaining but sub-par on every level. Reno is always good, and a supporting cast is decent. Worth a view.

  • Feb 13, 2017

    I love Jean Reno. Movie well done. I don't understand the less than stellar reviews. 2/13/17

    I love Jean Reno. Movie well done. I don't understand the less than stellar reviews. 2/13/17

  • Nov 08, 2016

    Au bout de quelques minutes dans l'Immortel, on a déjà vu Richard Berry en mafieux marseillais, un chihuahua se faire atomiser au fusil à pompe et Kad Merad en méchant sanguinaire. Difficile de se relever après un tel choc. Or, l'Immortel ne tente jamais de se relever et se complaît dans la fange des clichés du genre, sans pour autant profiter pleinement du cadre de la ville de Marseille. Heureusement, Richard Berry peut s'appuyer sur l'immense Jean Reno, qui pourrait lire l'annuaire et être passionnant. C'est bien lui qui sauve le film, tant les autres seconds rôles sont mauvais (Marina Foïs tout particulièrement). L'Immortel ne vaut presque rien et c'est dommage tant la vraie histoire est intéressante.

    Au bout de quelques minutes dans l'Immortel, on a déjà vu Richard Berry en mafieux marseillais, un chihuahua se faire atomiser au fusil à pompe et Kad Merad en méchant sanguinaire. Difficile de se relever après un tel choc. Or, l'Immortel ne tente jamais de se relever et se complaît dans la fange des clichés du genre, sans pour autant profiter pleinement du cadre de la ville de Marseille. Heureusement, Richard Berry peut s'appuyer sur l'immense Jean Reno, qui pourrait lire l'annuaire et être passionnant. C'est bien lui qui sauve le film, tant les autres seconds rôles sont mauvais (Marina Foïs tout particulièrement). L'Immortel ne vaut presque rien et c'est dommage tant la vraie histoire est intéressante.

  • Dec 13, 2015

    22 Bullets is a typical french action film with the incredible Jean Reno. The villains are two dimensional characters, and Reno pulls the revenge card and the one-man war theme straight by the book. It is a fun film, and has its great scenes, but provides little ingenuity to the screen. Pulling from many other films, this is a rendition of a story told many times, but with different actors and directors, which does work, just not as well or as awe-inspiring. 22 Bullets, or L'Immortel is a pleasant watch, but leaves little to be desired.

    22 Bullets is a typical french action film with the incredible Jean Reno. The villains are two dimensional characters, and Reno pulls the revenge card and the one-man war theme straight by the book. It is a fun film, and has its great scenes, but provides little ingenuity to the screen. Pulling from many other films, this is a rendition of a story told many times, but with different actors and directors, which does work, just not as well or as awe-inspiring. 22 Bullets, or L'Immortel is a pleasant watch, but leaves little to be desired.

  • Oct 24, 2015

    Genuinely thought it was amazing.

    Genuinely thought it was amazing.

  • Aug 20, 2015

    Putting the talents of Jean Reno into a Luc Besson production again, 22 Bullets sounded like a film with potential for action and acting. To be blunt, the number one thing I appreciated in 22 Bullets was the use of blood. Most contemporary action films, including Luc Besson productions like Taken 2 and Brick Mansions are edited extremely quickly in an exercise of rendering the action PG-13. There is a little bit of jolted editing that goes on in 22 Bullets, but it is not there to hide the blood. In actuality, the film embraces its violent content and uses the imagery to build a gritty mood. The entire film is rich in atmosphere thanks to an intense musical score to match on the auditory level what the blood delivers in the visual experience. The violence depicted in 22 Bullets prove to be the most stylish moments of the film and the fast pace of the story reinforces this feeling. However, it is a case of style over substance in 22 Bullets as the pace does not prove beneficial to the story. The pace seems to move along pretty fast. Considering that the film is a crime thriller this is good in one way because it means that it gets to the point faster, but at the same time since there is so much talking that goes on, the fact that it dashes through it means that there can be quite a bit to keep up with. But despite the fast pace of 22 Bullets, it cannot dash past the fact that it's story is one that lacks originality. And at the same time, since the story is so caught up in taking itself so seriously there is a sense that it tends to drag on with an unnecessary surplus of characters and dialogue which are not really that amusing. 22 Bullets may have stylish elements and a coupleof somewhat interesting characters, but at heart it is a very basic revenge oriented crime thriller. The intro to 22 Bullets depicts a stylishly fimed sequence where the protgonist is the victim of an attempted assassination where he is shot many times and left for dead. The way that the slow motion in this scene combines with the flying blood effects and the classical musical score gives the film a dynamic style, but it also foreshadows what proves to be a conventional story. As the narrative unfolds, so many cliche elements appear before our eyes. And at the same time, they are scattered among a narrative with a frustrating structure. With so many characters that the story focuses on, 22 Bullets jumps from protagonist to antagonist and everyone in between at a really rapid rate which is a challenge to fully comprehend. And as one begins to gain an understanding of everything that is happening, they realise how it is all an assortment of cliches thrown together into another generic crime thriller. There are occasional breaks from it all for moments of energetic violence and action, but the story fails to sustain it all. It's a shame because the action scenes in 22 Bullets are shot well and edited strongly enough while they unfold against the backdrop of some appealing scenery, reinforcing the stylish nature of the film. I just wish that writer-director Richard Berry could find something to do with them. Considering that 22 Bullets is loosely based on the true life story of Jacky Imbert, there is clearly potential with the story. The problem is that the idea of characterization takes a back seat to generic storytelling. Anything present with the intention of adding depth into protagonist Charly Mattei ends up feeling like yet another narrative cliche. The atmospheric nature of the film may strengthen these plot points, but it fails to give a sufficient character to Jean Reno to work with. Very little is offered in the way of depth in 22 Bullets because the story is so thin and predictable that any attempts to change that prove pretentious, weakening the genuine attempts of the script to transcend the generic roots it has set itself in so deeply. But as I said, the central reason I watched 22 Bullets was for its action and acting. And the same way it delivered the action to a certain extent, Jean Reno puts a modicum of greater value into the experience. Jean Reno's leading performance in 22 Bullets is a serious asset. Though his character is largely reduced to being a generic hero in a revenge tale, there are some powerful moments in the film where the atmosphere becomes really heavy as a means of capturing what he is meant to be feeling. Jean Reno keeps up with the mood of the film very well, capturing a restrained but obvious sense of emotional strength during these moments. But most of the time, 22 Bullets calls upon him to be an intense gunman, and he steps up to the plate very well. He doesn't play the character as thinly as he is sketched because Jean Reno has a naturally heartfelt aura about him whenever he speaks of what he is feeling. He clarifies the internal nature of Charly Mattei clearly through his restrained physical acting or articulate line delivery. And when he is called upon to pull the trigger, Jean Reno does it with a strong level of involvement. He shoots his enemies without flinching, but he takes the time to ensure that they understand why which clarifies it for viewers in the process. And at other times, he remains swift with his movements and ready for what ever comes next. Jean Reno keeps his energy alive in 22 Bullets, even though the script puts so much responsibility on him. So 22 Bullets is suitably bloody and led in a strong effort by Jean Reno, but the entertaining action of the film gets buried beneath a narrative that rushes through countless thin characters and cliches who that all still manage to pack the film with extensive periods of unappealing dialogue.

    Putting the talents of Jean Reno into a Luc Besson production again, 22 Bullets sounded like a film with potential for action and acting. To be blunt, the number one thing I appreciated in 22 Bullets was the use of blood. Most contemporary action films, including Luc Besson productions like Taken 2 and Brick Mansions are edited extremely quickly in an exercise of rendering the action PG-13. There is a little bit of jolted editing that goes on in 22 Bullets, but it is not there to hide the blood. In actuality, the film embraces its violent content and uses the imagery to build a gritty mood. The entire film is rich in atmosphere thanks to an intense musical score to match on the auditory level what the blood delivers in the visual experience. The violence depicted in 22 Bullets prove to be the most stylish moments of the film and the fast pace of the story reinforces this feeling. However, it is a case of style over substance in 22 Bullets as the pace does not prove beneficial to the story. The pace seems to move along pretty fast. Considering that the film is a crime thriller this is good in one way because it means that it gets to the point faster, but at the same time since there is so much talking that goes on, the fact that it dashes through it means that there can be quite a bit to keep up with. But despite the fast pace of 22 Bullets, it cannot dash past the fact that it's story is one that lacks originality. And at the same time, since the story is so caught up in taking itself so seriously there is a sense that it tends to drag on with an unnecessary surplus of characters and dialogue which are not really that amusing. 22 Bullets may have stylish elements and a coupleof somewhat interesting characters, but at heart it is a very basic revenge oriented crime thriller. The intro to 22 Bullets depicts a stylishly fimed sequence where the protgonist is the victim of an attempted assassination where he is shot many times and left for dead. The way that the slow motion in this scene combines with the flying blood effects and the classical musical score gives the film a dynamic style, but it also foreshadows what proves to be a conventional story. As the narrative unfolds, so many cliche elements appear before our eyes. And at the same time, they are scattered among a narrative with a frustrating structure. With so many characters that the story focuses on, 22 Bullets jumps from protagonist to antagonist and everyone in between at a really rapid rate which is a challenge to fully comprehend. And as one begins to gain an understanding of everything that is happening, they realise how it is all an assortment of cliches thrown together into another generic crime thriller. There are occasional breaks from it all for moments of energetic violence and action, but the story fails to sustain it all. It's a shame because the action scenes in 22 Bullets are shot well and edited strongly enough while they unfold against the backdrop of some appealing scenery, reinforcing the stylish nature of the film. I just wish that writer-director Richard Berry could find something to do with them. Considering that 22 Bullets is loosely based on the true life story of Jacky Imbert, there is clearly potential with the story. The problem is that the idea of characterization takes a back seat to generic storytelling. Anything present with the intention of adding depth into protagonist Charly Mattei ends up feeling like yet another narrative cliche. The atmospheric nature of the film may strengthen these plot points, but it fails to give a sufficient character to Jean Reno to work with. Very little is offered in the way of depth in 22 Bullets because the story is so thin and predictable that any attempts to change that prove pretentious, weakening the genuine attempts of the script to transcend the generic roots it has set itself in so deeply. But as I said, the central reason I watched 22 Bullets was for its action and acting. And the same way it delivered the action to a certain extent, Jean Reno puts a modicum of greater value into the experience. Jean Reno's leading performance in 22 Bullets is a serious asset. Though his character is largely reduced to being a generic hero in a revenge tale, there are some powerful moments in the film where the atmosphere becomes really heavy as a means of capturing what he is meant to be feeling. Jean Reno keeps up with the mood of the film very well, capturing a restrained but obvious sense of emotional strength during these moments. But most of the time, 22 Bullets calls upon him to be an intense gunman, and he steps up to the plate very well. He doesn't play the character as thinly as he is sketched because Jean Reno has a naturally heartfelt aura about him whenever he speaks of what he is feeling. He clarifies the internal nature of Charly Mattei clearly through his restrained physical acting or articulate line delivery. And when he is called upon to pull the trigger, Jean Reno does it with a strong level of involvement. He shoots his enemies without flinching, but he takes the time to ensure that they understand why which clarifies it for viewers in the process. And at other times, he remains swift with his movements and ready for what ever comes next. Jean Reno keeps his energy alive in 22 Bullets, even though the script puts so much responsibility on him. So 22 Bullets is suitably bloody and led in a strong effort by Jean Reno, but the entertaining action of the film gets buried beneath a narrative that rushes through countless thin characters and cliches who that all still manage to pack the film with extensive periods of unappealing dialogue.

  • Apr 27, 2015

    With Jean-Pierre Darroussin (Le Poulpe) who one doesn't see very often.

    With Jean-Pierre Darroussin (Le Poulpe) who one doesn't see very often.

  • Jan 31, 2015

    From the producers of "Taken"...Jean Reno stars in this suspenseful revenge thriller in French with English subtitles. I thought it was very well done - I've always been a fan of Jean Reno. I liked this movie much better than the "Taken" movies.

    From the producers of "Taken"...Jean Reno stars in this suspenseful revenge thriller in French with English subtitles. I thought it was very well done - I've always been a fan of Jean Reno. I liked this movie much better than the "Taken" movies.