Disclosure - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

Disclosure Reviews

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½ August 25, 2016
Had low expectations based on the reviews here but ended up enjoying it quite a bit. Outdated technology but still enjoyable.
March 23, 2016
Interesting but dated to the 90s when sexual harassment in the office became a touchy debate.
February 4, 2016
Far better than it has any reason to be.
½ January 5, 2016
A important piece of the Doglands thriller-campaign during the 80-90s. Demi Moore, surely makes you want more of her spellbinding figure. The plot isnt really that bad or obviously as everyone wants it to be. Entertaining.
December 21, 2015
Dated as all hell, but an interesting look at double standards and sexual harassment in the workplace.
½ November 16, 2015
Michael Douglas once again captivates our attention in this infidelity thriller that, while no "Fatal Attraction", is still gripping and terribly exciting in its twisting execution. The technology bit is terribly dated, though...
½ October 26, 2015
Bit Of Eighties Sleaze. No Real Story & A Lotta Focus On The Sex Scenes.
September 15, 2015
19 years after its release the sexual politics of this film are even more morally dubious now than they were in 1994. The corporate politics and technology have not aged well and the film wastes a potentially interesting theme. The cast are better than the material they are given and are poorly served by their director and the script.
August 21, 2015
WOW.......WOW......WOW.....WHAT A MOVIE.......I HAVE JUST SEEN THIS MOVIE 4 THE 1ST TIME N THINK THAT THIS IS SUCH AN ENJOYABLE MOVIE 2 WATCH........its got a good cast of actors/actresses throughout this movie......I think that Michael douglas, demi moore, Donald Sutherland, caroline goodall, roma mafia, play good roles/parts throughout this movie........I think that the director of this drama/mystery/suspense movie had done a good job of directing this movie because you never know what 2 expect throughout this movie...... I think that Michael douglas was absolutely brilliant throughout this movie.....WARNING YOU HAVE GOT TO WATCH THE END OF THE CREDITS THROUGHOUT THIS MOVIE AS SOMETHING HAPPENS AT THE END OF THE CREDITS THROUGHOUT THIS MOVIE........its got such a good soundtrack throughout this movie......





Michael Crichton sold the movie rights for $1 million before the novel was published. Milo Forman was originally attached to direct but left due to creative differences with Crichton. Barry Levinson and Alan J. Pakula were in contention to take the helm and Levinson was hired.

Annette Bening was originally set to play Meredith until she became pregnant and soon dropped out. Geena Davis and Michelle Pfeiffer were then considered before Levinson decided to cast Demi Moore. Crichton wrote the character Mark Lewyn for the film specifically with Dennis Miller in mind. The character from the book was somewhat modified for the screenplay to fit Miller's personality.

The virtual reality corridor sequence was designed by Industrial Light & Magic.





The movie was filmed in and around Seattle, Washington. The fictional corporation DigiCom is located in Pioneer Square, on a set which was constructed for the film. Production designer Neil Spisak said, "DigiCom needed to have a hard edge to it, with lots of glass and a modern look juxtaposed against the old red brick which is indigenous to the Pioneer Square area of Seattle. Barry liked the idea of using glass so that wherever you looked you'd see workers in their offices or stopping to chat. This seemed to fit the ominous sense that Barry was looking for-a sort of Rear Window effect, where you're looking across at people in their private spaces."

Also shown are the Washington State Ferries because Douglas' character lives on Bainbridge Island. Other locations include Washington Park Arboretum, Volunteer Park, the Four Seasons Hotel on University St., Pike Place Market and Smith Tower (Alvarez's law office). The director of photography was the British cinematographer Tony Pierce-Roberts.




I think that this is such a gripping movie 2 watch, but it is such a really powerful drama movie 2 watch, its got such a brilliant cast throughout this movie.....I think that this is such an enjoyable movie 2 watch, with such a fantastic cast throughout this movie......
August 16, 2015
The battle of sexes in this fun to watch film.
½ April 19, 2015
Interesting in parts and draw dropping maddening in others.....to say it's uneven is being kind.
April 2, 2015
On the level of pure craft, Disclosure is first-rate in every department. It soars because of the sizzling chemistry of Douglas and Demi Moore. Douglas makes for a sympathetic and wily hero while Moore modeling some slinky lingerie makes an awesome femme fatale. Hokey and classy in equal measure, this is better than it ought to be.
March 29, 2015
Michael Douglas is the King of Erotic Thrillers. Having starred in the two most notorious steamy romance-from-hell movies of all time (I don't even have to tell you what they are, you already know) it's interesting to see Douglas taking on the role of a victim of sexual harassment. Unfortunately, the movie loses itself in some bizarre "Star Trek"like subplot about virtual reality that seems to have barged in from an entirely different movie. We SHOULD be focusing on Douglas as he tries to prove his innocence, not whatever the hell was going on behind those VR goggles. Unfortunately, I can't call the sexual harassment portion of the story a success either, because the harasser is Demi Moore. Gorgeous? Yes. Talented at acting? I've yet to see any evidence to support that statement. I've never seen a Demi Moore movie where she didn't recite her dialogue like she was reading it directly off of cue cards just off camera for the first time. It's especially bad here. A reunion with Glenn Close or Sharon Stone would have been more thrilling and meaningful.
February 17, 2015
A married man is sexually harassed by his former lover who's his new boss. This film tries too hard to be too many things, never finding a rhythm as it switches from social drama to thriller to courtroom drama.
½ January 30, 2015
It's a sham. "Disclosure" tells you it's all about sexual discrimination but it's really all about the poor victimized male ego, and all ambitious women are power made bitches. The only women who are decent human beings are either doormats or almost criminally absent, excepting the shark, played with malicious delight by Moore. Douglas plays the victim and it's not cute. It's well made and if you can swallow this candy coated crap you may have a fairly good time. If you can't? *shrugs*
January 25, 2015
The gender politics of this film are pretty screwy in this gender swap sexual harassment corporate thriller. Michael Douglas is sexually harassed by his superior, Demi Moore. What is Douglas to do when he fends off the advances of his sexy new boss and has to return home with sexy claw marks on his chest? Then what's he to do when Moore accuses him of attacking her? Rich white male victims have it so rough. It's just not fair. Douglas kind of specialized in this type of part for a while, doing this and also playing the victim in "Fatal Attraction" and "Basic Instinct." Those films were much better than this one, which plays out like a slickly made movie-of-the-week. Annette Benning was originally cast until she became pregnant. I can't help but think that she would have brought a different tone to the film, whereas the casting of Demi Moore made this feel more like a sensational piece of trash. The film wants to be an intellectual dissection about power, sex and gender, but it ends up being more of a trashy mashup of "Basic Instinct" and "The Firm." And what's dummest is that is that Douglas could have solved his problems with a pocket tape recorder and just caught some of Moore's continuing harassing statements on tape. Director Barry Levinson and writer Paul Attanasio (along with producer/novelist Michael Crichton) are too smart for this trash. However, it's rather compelling trash that I wanted to see how it all winds up, but chases scenes through 1994 virtual reality are pretty ridiculous. Ennio Morricone does provide a nice score for the film though.
July 8, 2014
Extremely dark, terrifyingly well acted, and thought provoking, another example of why I loved Michael Douglas
April 7, 2014
It looks decent early on but becomes very boring through a plot that is just not interesting enough
February 26, 2014
I was only really interesting in Disclosure because it featured Demi Moore in a rather sexual role, and because so far I've been somewhat impressed by Michael Douglas' erotic thrillers such as Basic Instinct and Fatal Attraction.

It's a while before Disclosure kicks into gear as it makes it through the erotic theme of the story, so its pacing is a little slow at the start.
Disclosure hits an interesting takeoff when Roma Maffia's character Catherine Alvarez explains to Michael Douglas' Tom Sanders that whether or not he sues for sexual harassment he has a huge chance of failure. Once the real courtroom drama of the story begins, Disclosure becomes interesting and even somewhat compelling.
In a way, Disclosure borrows themes from To Kill A Mockingbird. To Kill a Mockingbird features a story about a black man being charged with something he is innocent for and cannot win in a society dominated by white men, resulting in him being found guilty despite clear evidence. In Disclosure, protagonist Tom Sanders is faces in the difficult situation of being falsely accused of sexual harassment by a powerful female figure which is believed by a crowd of people who don't believe that sexual harassment can happen to men. This represents a cultural shift which has continued over the course of 20 years where sexual harassment has become cracked down on and females have become favoured for being known as the weaker gender which results in special treatment in case of sexual harassment or assault which has become known as "violence against women". In Disclosure, viewers see the kind of pressure the male community faces because of society's favourable treatment of female figures when it comes to sexual politics, and the story presents a strong female figure who has more power than any other characters who initiates the case. Neither sex is called is weaker in Disclosure, but both come head to head in a situation where the female has more power.
As a person who has experienced discrimination and sexism due to being a male during several events in my life, I could easily connect to Disclosure which made me feel angry. I spent most of my Year 12 suffering at the hands of two sexist female figures at my school and couldn't make a plausible argument against them since my principle told me "You can never win an argument with a woman", and due to that I sat there and had to let myself be struck several times by female students knowing that defending myself would result in serious trouble. Even though Disclosure is 20 years old, its commentary on the strong manipulative role many women play in society is incredibly valid and true, and as a person who supports equality, Disclosure really speaks to me when it deals with sexual politics.
Disclosure's flaw is its technological story element, because the role that the computers play in the story isn't clarified all that well and it all seems like a subplot to the story even though it is key to the premise. But most of it isn't clarified well and so it all seems confusing when the computer flashes lights on screen. And what the actual purpose of the Digicom virtual reality program is aside from being just a fancy way to look into a computer system and a way for the filmmakers to show off the kind of visual effects they are working with. It never seems like such an important story element and there isn't much of a reason clarifying why a company is putting so much effort into building it when it does the same things a computer can but only looks cooler. Essentially, it feels like the only point of the visual effects sequences in Disclosure are for the sake of making the film a more visually thrilling depiction of computer science as to make it a techno thriller from a visual perspective. And while there is no denying that the visuals are good, it just seems unnecessary and doesn't actually change the story much. Really, half of the story in Disclosure is good while the other half is convoluted and lacks explanation, so it succeeds as a courtroom drama but not as a thriller because it misses its reach for that.
The musical score is undeniably effective though, and you could expect nothing less from mastermind composer Ennio Morricone. And thanks to the cast, Disclosure feels genuine.
Michael Douglas gives a performance which is once again ripe a lot of tension and ferocity which he can deliver at will, and so as a lead he never comes up short in Disclosure. He makes Tom Sanders a very easily sympathetic figure and delivers his natural charisma to the role which he has given to many performances, making Disclosure another example of his strength as a lead actor.
If you came into the second half of the film Disclosure and didn't witness the first half of the film, it would be too easy to believe that Meredith Johnson was the character that was really victimised, because Demi Moore's dedicated performance which gets detail to the emotion in her line delivery and the intensity in her facial gestures, so much so that she is able to manipulate so many aspects of the story for her own sake. Her energy is powerful, and her sexual aggression is undeniably strong, so she makes a powerful seductive antagonist in Disclosure with an intense chemistry with Michael Douglas.
Roma Maffia is the other standout in Disclosure because her relentless passion for line delivery which is swift and sharp makes her perfect for the role of a lawyer fighting for the case of Tom Sanders. Once she comes into play, the true interesting elements of the story begin to kick off, so she's a great presence.
Donald Sutherland does a fine job too.

So while it's not director Barry Levinson's greatest work and is semi-flawed, Disclosure is a strong look at sexual politics which benefits from dedicated performances from its cast.
February 2, 2014
Director Barry Levinson displays a great dramatic sense with a heavy build-up of suspense blended with powerful chemistry between Michael Douglas and Demi Moore.
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