Eat Drink Man Woman (Yin shi nan nu) Reviews

  • Feb 07, 2019

    A heart warming experience about food, love and life

    A heart warming experience about food, love and life

  • Nov 16, 2018

    This was such an amazing movie! The only word to describe it is intimate. Very complex and engaging characters. The ending is shocking. But given the complexity of each character and their world of secrets, I bought it. This movie, like Life of Pi, has a haunting quality about it that stays with you long after the movie is over.

    This was such an amazing movie! The only word to describe it is intimate. Very complex and engaging characters. The ending is shocking. But given the complexity of each character and their world of secrets, I bought it. This movie, like Life of Pi, has a haunting quality about it that stays with you long after the movie is over.

  • May 24, 2018

    Taiwanese Eat, Pray, Love but better

    Taiwanese Eat, Pray, Love but better

  • Jan 26, 2017

    Made me very hungry. Lovely story.

    Made me very hungry. Lovely story.

  • Jun 05, 2016

    A scrumptious feast for the actors and for us audience, a delightful moving tale of Taiwanese master chef widower's tender loving care for his three daughters. Dinner every night was a labor of love for the chef who compulsively cooked up a banquet for his three daughters with food fit for a king. The story was especially heartwarming for one who has visited and know the life in Taiwan.

    A scrumptious feast for the actors and for us audience, a delightful moving tale of Taiwanese master chef widower's tender loving care for his three daughters. Dinner every night was a labor of love for the chef who compulsively cooked up a banquet for his three daughters with food fit for a king. The story was especially heartwarming for one who has visited and know the life in Taiwan.

  • Mar 02, 2015

    Ang Lee's third feature film and the final chapter of his "family trilogy" in Taiwan before launching an outstanding career in Hollywood, after his debut PUSHING HAND aka. ?? (1992) and THE WEDDING BANQUET aka. ?? (1993, 9/10), EAT DRINK MAN WOMAN is consummately charming, and profoundly endearing, plus it is an unabashed food porn of Chinese cuisine. keep reading my review on my blog: http://wp.me/p1eXom-1Ph

    Ang Lee's third feature film and the final chapter of his "family trilogy" in Taiwan before launching an outstanding career in Hollywood, after his debut PUSHING HAND aka. ?? (1992) and THE WEDDING BANQUET aka. ?? (1993, 9/10), EAT DRINK MAN WOMAN is consummately charming, and profoundly endearing, plus it is an unabashed food porn of Chinese cuisine. keep reading my review on my blog: http://wp.me/p1eXom-1Ph

  • Dec 15, 2014

    Review In A Nutshell: Family is one of the most important aspects of my life. It is tradition for my family to be together during Sundays, attend church at 10:30 am and have a lunch together at the local mall. Even when the relationships between particular members of the family are strained, we still come together and continue our tradition. There is nothing like the support and love a family member, who will be there for you unconditionally and see through the facade that one creates for the outside world in order to shadow the sadness and pain that fills inside them. Life will eventually change this relationship, with me probably having to leave the nest to pursue and start a family of my own; it is a future that I both want and reluctant to pursue. This is why I make the most out of my day, ensuring that I am there with my family every night before they sleep; showing them in my own way that I love them so dearly. Ang Lee, a director who has proven himself worthy of hard-hitting dramas like Brokeback Mountain and visual beauty in his existential film Life of Pi. The theme of familial relationships have been explored in his 1997 film, The Ice Storm, that also focuses on a youth's road and transition to adulthood; exploring their desires to experiment and find themselves in order to create direction of what and who they want to be. Eat Drink Man Woman, the last film before he transitions to English-language films, covers the same ground as The Ice Storm but does so with much better writing and direction. It tells the story of an aging father, who is a chef but is slowly losing his sense of taste, and his three daughters. The film explore ideas similar to Yasujiro Ozu's An Autumn Afternoon, about daughters living with their father but life introduces them to opportunities that naturally pushes them away from their home. The feeling of guilt is found in each of the daughters with one leaving, as they feel someone should be present at home to take care of their father; I found it to be heart-aching as it resonates so much of my own culture, seeing so many families having to postpone their life in order to take care of the one that has cared for them for all those years. Lee has given us a story that demonstrates the balance in our lives, that nothing is ever as good as it seems, as to take an opportunity is to give up something in order to make room, and it is through this that shows the brilliance of Ang Lee's writing and direction; treating the genre of drama and his material with realism and respect. Though the film is a dramatic piece, it also manages to become a feast for the eyes, and mouth, with constant images of deliciously crafted cuisines that would leave one in a state of such hunger that salivation is imminent. The film gives us a wonderful introduction to the nature of Asian food and culture, with such beauty and grace; which then becomes ironic later due to the fact that the father's cooking ability and taste has been deteriorating. Sometimes it is the preparation of the meal that is much more fascinating and more stimulating than the actual dishes themselves; I could spend hours watching this man fry, steam, dice, mix, and boil, like painter using his brush with elegant strokes. Eat Drink Man Woman's introduction is right up there tied with Babette's Feast climax, exposing the artistic craft behind cooking. The acting performances in this film were outstanding, creating wonderful and natural chemistry, particularly during scenes at the dinner table. The film spends enough time to give each of its central characters to be fleshed out, showcasing not only the complexities in their character but also witnessing the scope and brilliance of their performances; the drama that happens outside of the family were able to become just as interesting as when they are together, and the credit goes both the cast members and Ang Lee's amazing direction. Eat Drink Man Woman is a perfect example of a film that manages to be both thematically accessible and dramatically stimulating, without resorting to over-acted scenes and a heavy tone that tries to make its material feel over-important and self-indulgent. Eat Drink Man Woman is a perfect dish crafted by an intelligent and tender artist.

    Review In A Nutshell: Family is one of the most important aspects of my life. It is tradition for my family to be together during Sundays, attend church at 10:30 am and have a lunch together at the local mall. Even when the relationships between particular members of the family are strained, we still come together and continue our tradition. There is nothing like the support and love a family member, who will be there for you unconditionally and see through the facade that one creates for the outside world in order to shadow the sadness and pain that fills inside them. Life will eventually change this relationship, with me probably having to leave the nest to pursue and start a family of my own; it is a future that I both want and reluctant to pursue. This is why I make the most out of my day, ensuring that I am there with my family every night before they sleep; showing them in my own way that I love them so dearly. Ang Lee, a director who has proven himself worthy of hard-hitting dramas like Brokeback Mountain and visual beauty in his existential film Life of Pi. The theme of familial relationships have been explored in his 1997 film, The Ice Storm, that also focuses on a youth's road and transition to adulthood; exploring their desires to experiment and find themselves in order to create direction of what and who they want to be. Eat Drink Man Woman, the last film before he transitions to English-language films, covers the same ground as The Ice Storm but does so with much better writing and direction. It tells the story of an aging father, who is a chef but is slowly losing his sense of taste, and his three daughters. The film explore ideas similar to Yasujiro Ozu's An Autumn Afternoon, about daughters living with their father but life introduces them to opportunities that naturally pushes them away from their home. The feeling of guilt is found in each of the daughters with one leaving, as they feel someone should be present at home to take care of their father; I found it to be heart-aching as it resonates so much of my own culture, seeing so many families having to postpone their life in order to take care of the one that has cared for them for all those years. Lee has given us a story that demonstrates the balance in our lives, that nothing is ever as good as it seems, as to take an opportunity is to give up something in order to make room, and it is through this that shows the brilliance of Ang Lee's writing and direction; treating the genre of drama and his material with realism and respect. Though the film is a dramatic piece, it also manages to become a feast for the eyes, and mouth, with constant images of deliciously crafted cuisines that would leave one in a state of such hunger that salivation is imminent. The film gives us a wonderful introduction to the nature of Asian food and culture, with such beauty and grace; which then becomes ironic later due to the fact that the father's cooking ability and taste has been deteriorating. Sometimes it is the preparation of the meal that is much more fascinating and more stimulating than the actual dishes themselves; I could spend hours watching this man fry, steam, dice, mix, and boil, like painter using his brush with elegant strokes. Eat Drink Man Woman's introduction is right up there tied with Babette's Feast climax, exposing the artistic craft behind cooking. The acting performances in this film were outstanding, creating wonderful and natural chemistry, particularly during scenes at the dinner table. The film spends enough time to give each of its central characters to be fleshed out, showcasing not only the complexities in their character but also witnessing the scope and brilliance of their performances; the drama that happens outside of the family were able to become just as interesting as when they are together, and the credit goes both the cast members and Ang Lee's amazing direction. Eat Drink Man Woman is a perfect example of a film that manages to be both thematically accessible and dramatically stimulating, without resorting to over-acted scenes and a heavy tone that tries to make its material feel over-important and self-indulgent. Eat Drink Man Woman is a perfect dish crafted by an intelligent and tender artist.

  • Aug 29, 2014

    Eat Drink Man Woman is a full course of narrative: it serves dry humour, warm family values, traditional recipes and contemporary taste.

    Eat Drink Man Woman is a full course of narrative: it serves dry humour, warm family values, traditional recipes and contemporary taste.

  • Aug 09, 2014

    good, not great, family drama with comic elements. very nicely done, and sympathetic characterization, but a bit artificial-feeling

    good, not great, family drama with comic elements. very nicely done, and sympathetic characterization, but a bit artificial-feeling

  • Jun 21, 2014

    Stunningly involved. Serious, funny, accessible.... Moving without ever being contrived. Never syrupy with sap. Never a trace of disingenuous tear-jerk-baiting. Simply, this is a recipe for the best character drama that can be found.

    Stunningly involved. Serious, funny, accessible.... Moving without ever being contrived. Never syrupy with sap. Never a trace of disingenuous tear-jerk-baiting. Simply, this is a recipe for the best character drama that can be found.