Eraserhead Reviews

  • 3d ago

    What was all that about? And for crying out loud, can that baby stop crying already?

    What was all that about? And for crying out loud, can that baby stop crying already?

  • Jun 18, 2019

    Just a stunning, mesmerizing 90 minutes. You can’t look away.

    Just a stunning, mesmerizing 90 minutes. You can’t look away.

  • Jun 12, 2019

    DON'T BOTHER. The emperor has no clothes.

    DON'T BOTHER. The emperor has no clothes.

  • Jun 12, 2019

    Really bad. Self-indulgent and nihilistic.

    Really bad. Self-indulgent and nihilistic.

  • Jun 01, 2019

    This is the worst movie I've ever seen. It should be negative 1000 stars. Unfortunately, I found myself in a situation where I was obligated to watch it. Being forced to watch this movie would be torture. Don't watch it. It was a huge waste of my time and I regret the fact that I've seen it.

    This is the worst movie I've ever seen. It should be negative 1000 stars. Unfortunately, I found myself in a situation where I was obligated to watch it. Being forced to watch this movie would be torture. Don't watch it. It was a huge waste of my time and I regret the fact that I've seen it.

  • May 16, 2019

    Eraserhead is a great movie for those who like taking movies apart, analyzing characters and finding meaning in stories and symbols. It's a must-see for cinephiles, and film students (both professional and amateur), but I suspect most other people will be bored.

    Eraserhead is a great movie for those who like taking movies apart, analyzing characters and finding meaning in stories and symbols. It's a must-see for cinephiles, and film students (both professional and amateur), but I suspect most other people will be bored.

  • May 09, 2019

    Disturbing but brilliant

    Disturbing but brilliant

  • Apr 26, 2019

    Eraserhead is an uncanny nightmare, almost unexplainable. The protagonist Henry finds he's recently become a father and is forced to marry the mother of his child. The pressure that comes with the responsibilities of being a parent and the sudden change of lifestyle become too much for Henry to handle and he begins contemplating suicide after he realizes he's unable to properly care for his child.

    Eraserhead is an uncanny nightmare, almost unexplainable. The protagonist Henry finds he's recently become a father and is forced to marry the mother of his child. The pressure that comes with the responsibilities of being a parent and the sudden change of lifestyle become too much for Henry to handle and he begins contemplating suicide after he realizes he's unable to properly care for his child.

  • Avatar
    Peter B Super Reviewer
    Feb 21, 2019

    22/02/2019

    22/02/2019

  • Feb 09, 2019

    Mind numbing body horror and anxiety inducing suspense. Eraserhead (1977) is like a curious dream that devolves into an absolute nightmare. David Lynch's direction is peerless with a slow burn that creeps into your mind with the horror of what this man is witnessing. To say that Eraserhead is about one man's fear of fatherhood and marriage is an understatement. Eraserhead depicts a socially awkward man suddenly married to a woman he thought he loved and thrust into parenting a deformed monstrous child. It is a gripping horror feast that feeds upon our imagination of what is happening and the details therein our minds. I have to mention Jack Nance's acting performance as Henry Spencer. His massive haircut, awkward saunter, nervous voice, and timid persona all make Henry film's outsider extraordinaire. Eraserhead would not be the same without Nance's incredible leading performance to engage us with the paranormal exotic dream stuff that makes up the majority of Eraserhead. Nance's sincerity gives the viewer a sense that this strange man could very well be real. Lynch's direction is so fascinating as he focuses in on the little details and odd structure of Eraserhead. His imagery is unforgettable as is his windy cold sound design. Lynch's writing is quite realistic and grounded in moments, then jumps into the absurd to shock you. He'll get to the immediate heart of why the lead is afraid of becoming a father, then throw the world at you with unearthly visuals to convey his pain, uncertainty, and horror. The entire score is unsettling organ music played by Fats Waller and scored by Lynch himself. Frederick Elmes and Herbert Cardwell's cinematography is captivating smoothness and long panning shots from David Lynch to suck you into this nightmare world. The camera movements and photography are so beautiful that you are wrapped into a dreamy trance despite the atrocity you are about to witness throughout Eraserhead. Eraserhead is certainly the most ambitious debut film from any director that I can think of as Lynch takes the classic black and white aesthetic and grounds it in a factory town, only to upend our expectations with surreal effects and visuals. The lighting is Eraserhead is immaculate. Lynch has faces illuminated in the darkest rooms, while other times the silhouettes and shadows on the walls are all we get. Lynch's shadowplay style of direction in Eraserhead is stunning to look at and always interesting. Lynch's puppetry, makeup, and special effects are a cinematic wonder. The puppets move so lifelike that you can imagine its agony at existing. The painful movements, gasping breaths, infantile crying, realistic movements, and oily appearance all make the puppetry in Eraserhead phenomenal to behold. The makeup looks so eerie as characters look like ghosts of Adams family members out in society. The special effects all appear practical camera lens tricks and innovative uses of clever editing and sudden framing to hide any of Lynch's effects. All these technical aspects culminate in Eraserhead's hideous baby abortion and spatial dream sequences. Overall, Eraserhead is a totally unique cinematic experience. It's like you are stuck watching the annihilation of the human psyche as Lynch breaks down our comfort levels and focuses in on the inhuman. All to depict the horrors of fatherhood. Eraserhead is an innovative film as well as a thoughtfully resonant one.

    Mind numbing body horror and anxiety inducing suspense. Eraserhead (1977) is like a curious dream that devolves into an absolute nightmare. David Lynch's direction is peerless with a slow burn that creeps into your mind with the horror of what this man is witnessing. To say that Eraserhead is about one man's fear of fatherhood and marriage is an understatement. Eraserhead depicts a socially awkward man suddenly married to a woman he thought he loved and thrust into parenting a deformed monstrous child. It is a gripping horror feast that feeds upon our imagination of what is happening and the details therein our minds. I have to mention Jack Nance's acting performance as Henry Spencer. His massive haircut, awkward saunter, nervous voice, and timid persona all make Henry film's outsider extraordinaire. Eraserhead would not be the same without Nance's incredible leading performance to engage us with the paranormal exotic dream stuff that makes up the majority of Eraserhead. Nance's sincerity gives the viewer a sense that this strange man could very well be real. Lynch's direction is so fascinating as he focuses in on the little details and odd structure of Eraserhead. His imagery is unforgettable as is his windy cold sound design. Lynch's writing is quite realistic and grounded in moments, then jumps into the absurd to shock you. He'll get to the immediate heart of why the lead is afraid of becoming a father, then throw the world at you with unearthly visuals to convey his pain, uncertainty, and horror. The entire score is unsettling organ music played by Fats Waller and scored by Lynch himself. Frederick Elmes and Herbert Cardwell's cinematography is captivating smoothness and long panning shots from David Lynch to suck you into this nightmare world. The camera movements and photography are so beautiful that you are wrapped into a dreamy trance despite the atrocity you are about to witness throughout Eraserhead. Eraserhead is certainly the most ambitious debut film from any director that I can think of as Lynch takes the classic black and white aesthetic and grounds it in a factory town, only to upend our expectations with surreal effects and visuals. The lighting is Eraserhead is immaculate. Lynch has faces illuminated in the darkest rooms, while other times the silhouettes and shadows on the walls are all we get. Lynch's shadowplay style of direction in Eraserhead is stunning to look at and always interesting. Lynch's puppetry, makeup, and special effects are a cinematic wonder. The puppets move so lifelike that you can imagine its agony at existing. The painful movements, gasping breaths, infantile crying, realistic movements, and oily appearance all make the puppetry in Eraserhead phenomenal to behold. The makeup looks so eerie as characters look like ghosts of Adams family members out in society. The special effects all appear practical camera lens tricks and innovative uses of clever editing and sudden framing to hide any of Lynch's effects. All these technical aspects culminate in Eraserhead's hideous baby abortion and spatial dream sequences. Overall, Eraserhead is a totally unique cinematic experience. It's like you are stuck watching the annihilation of the human psyche as Lynch breaks down our comfort levels and focuses in on the inhuman. All to depict the horrors of fatherhood. Eraserhead is an innovative film as well as a thoughtfully resonant one.