In a Lonely Place Reviews

  • 4d ago

    Great seeing Bogart going full out tortured bad guy.

    Great seeing Bogart going full out tortured bad guy.

  • 6d ago

    "He's Dix Steel, and if you want him, you gotta take it all ... I've taken it for twenty years, and I'd do it again". (childish snickering) In a Lonely Place places its foundations in conventional noir territory, a murder investigation filled with wise cracks and West Coast locales, but differentiates itself through the far deeper exploration of the torrid relationship between Bogart's Dix and Graham's Gray. Dix is a fascinating evolution of Bogart's earlier protagonists, with plenty of the charisma and determinatiion on the surface, but revealing a volatile, flawed secondary personality that prevents him from forming relationships of any substance or length. While not wholly evil or intentionally cruel, his character is possessive, quick to anger, and demanding to the point that it is ultimately completely debilitating, and Bogart brings this extraordinarily realistic portrayal to life flawlessly. The pacing is at times somewhat erratic, and the film doesn't necessarily provide complete payoffs for many of its earlier characters (particularly the murder that instigates the plot), but is still a very relevant character study. (4/5)

    "He's Dix Steel, and if you want him, you gotta take it all ... I've taken it for twenty years, and I'd do it again". (childish snickering) In a Lonely Place places its foundations in conventional noir territory, a murder investigation filled with wise cracks and West Coast locales, but differentiates itself through the far deeper exploration of the torrid relationship between Bogart's Dix and Graham's Gray. Dix is a fascinating evolution of Bogart's earlier protagonists, with plenty of the charisma and determinatiion on the surface, but revealing a volatile, flawed secondary personality that prevents him from forming relationships of any substance or length. While not wholly evil or intentionally cruel, his character is possessive, quick to anger, and demanding to the point that it is ultimately completely debilitating, and Bogart brings this extraordinarily realistic portrayal to life flawlessly. The pacing is at times somewhat erratic, and the film doesn't necessarily provide complete payoffs for many of its earlier characters (particularly the murder that instigates the plot), but is still a very relevant character study. (4/5)

  • Nov 19, 2020

    Great noire. You know Bogart didn't do it ... but as the movie progresses, he tries to change your mind. But Grahame steals the show. You can't take your eyes off of her.

    Great noire. You know Bogart didn't do it ... but as the movie progresses, he tries to change your mind. But Grahame steals the show. You can't take your eyes off of her.

  • Nov 15, 2020

    Not bad for a late Bogie flick.

    Not bad for a late Bogie flick.

  • Oct 28, 2020

    Uninteresting characters meet a slow moving plot and gives you no reason to care about the outcome.

    Uninteresting characters meet a slow moving plot and gives you no reason to care about the outcome.

  • Aug 31, 2020

    Interesting. B0GART as a bad guy again. GLORIA GRAHAM glookin and xlnt. FRANK LOVEJOY. 1950. NOIR. Suspense, thriller. Saw on TV MOVIE CHANNEL 8.2020

    Interesting. B0GART as a bad guy again. GLORIA GRAHAM glookin and xlnt. FRANK LOVEJOY. 1950. NOIR. Suspense, thriller. Saw on TV MOVIE CHANNEL 8.2020

  • Jul 21, 2020

    I have to admit, films from before the 60's so often are much less impressive to me than those viewers who were of that time. For them, the production values, camera techniques and acting was the best their had ever been up to then. For me, I generally find much of the acting to be rather wooden, melodramatic, or too much like stage acting, which I feel is too overly dramatic or stilted. In A Lonely Place has a great story line. Bogart is top notch as usual. Grahame is good overall, but with some particularly weak scenes, along with her rather hackneyed eyebrow raising for effect. The cheesy old fop actor Charlie is just annoying. But it's Bogart portraying a man split between the Holly wood screenwriter of some renown and the 'dynamite' just waiting to explode on some poor random big mouth is what really makes the film outside of the story line itself. Also, the use of the two apartments, the one above the other where you can 'look into' the other is esp. clever. You can see into the home where movies are written; an imitation of life, of the fantasy you wish was your life, not real life with all its harshness and unpredictability. 3.4 stars

    I have to admit, films from before the 60's so often are much less impressive to me than those viewers who were of that time. For them, the production values, camera techniques and acting was the best their had ever been up to then. For me, I generally find much of the acting to be rather wooden, melodramatic, or too much like stage acting, which I feel is too overly dramatic or stilted. In A Lonely Place has a great story line. Bogart is top notch as usual. Grahame is good overall, but with some particularly weak scenes, along with her rather hackneyed eyebrow raising for effect. The cheesy old fop actor Charlie is just annoying. But it's Bogart portraying a man split between the Holly wood screenwriter of some renown and the 'dynamite' just waiting to explode on some poor random big mouth is what really makes the film outside of the story line itself. Also, the use of the two apartments, the one above the other where you can 'look into' the other is esp. clever. You can see into the home where movies are written; an imitation of life, of the fantasy you wish was your life, not real life with all its harshness and unpredictability. 3.4 stars

  • Jun 29, 2020

    Because Dixon Steele is the character most like Bogart himself, this is Bogart's best performance. It might even be the best movie in which Bogart ever acted.

    Because Dixon Steele is the character most like Bogart himself, this is Bogart's best performance. It might even be the best movie in which Bogart ever acted.

  • Jun 19, 2020

    One of the all-time great noirs.

    One of the all-time great noirs.

  • May 16, 2019

    There are so many kinds of good murder mysteries, and I tend to love any of them if they are told well. I thrive on the tension created as the police put together the pieces, and I get to deduce what happened along with them. In a Lonely Place takes that concept and boils it down to a single mystery. We know exactly where the murder took place, we know how it was done, and there is even a limited pool of suspects. But it keeps you engaged because the single question remains if the protagonist of the film did it or not. With a great deal of skill, they shift our opinions of the protagonist back and forth, always questioning if he’s been deceiving us and might be a killer. Humphrey Bogart is amazing in the lead role, and it takes a great deal of nuance to pull this off. He can look devious in one scene, and then switch to kind and loving in the next, without feeling like two different characters. That performance kept me on edge waiting for a final reveal. This is the kind of movie that keeps building the tension, all leading to a climactic moment at the end. The writers also did a great job of shifting the role of protagonist to Gloria Grahame as the evidence started to pile up against Bogart’s character. We are able to experience the mystery vicariously through her, and feel the tension mounting as we suspect her life might be in danger. It’s a strong film with certain scenes that will stick with me for a long time. I think where it struggles a little is in how much it vilifies the main character. There’s a certain point in the film where they establish him as so dangerous and prone to violent outbursts that I wasn’t sure whether it mattered if he was a killer or not. He seemed like an unstable person who should probably be avoided anyways, and that took some of the power out of the final reveal. Whether he is shown to be innocent or guilty, Gloria Grahame’s character probably shouldn’t be with him. I know that’s the point they were trying to make at the end, but I think they made him too violent too early. It’s a small complaint, because I still like the style of In a Lonely Place, and I think it’s a strong murder mystery film told in a unique way.

    There are so many kinds of good murder mysteries, and I tend to love any of them if they are told well. I thrive on the tension created as the police put together the pieces, and I get to deduce what happened along with them. In a Lonely Place takes that concept and boils it down to a single mystery. We know exactly where the murder took place, we know how it was done, and there is even a limited pool of suspects. But it keeps you engaged because the single question remains if the protagonist of the film did it or not. With a great deal of skill, they shift our opinions of the protagonist back and forth, always questioning if he’s been deceiving us and might be a killer. Humphrey Bogart is amazing in the lead role, and it takes a great deal of nuance to pull this off. He can look devious in one scene, and then switch to kind and loving in the next, without feeling like two different characters. That performance kept me on edge waiting for a final reveal. This is the kind of movie that keeps building the tension, all leading to a climactic moment at the end. The writers also did a great job of shifting the role of protagonist to Gloria Grahame as the evidence started to pile up against Bogart’s character. We are able to experience the mystery vicariously through her, and feel the tension mounting as we suspect her life might be in danger. It’s a strong film with certain scenes that will stick with me for a long time. I think where it struggles a little is in how much it vilifies the main character. There’s a certain point in the film where they establish him as so dangerous and prone to violent outbursts that I wasn’t sure whether it mattered if he was a killer or not. He seemed like an unstable person who should probably be avoided anyways, and that took some of the power out of the final reveal. Whether he is shown to be innocent or guilty, Gloria Grahame’s character probably shouldn’t be with him. I know that’s the point they were trying to make at the end, but I think they made him too violent too early. It’s a small complaint, because I still like the style of In a Lonely Place, and I think it’s a strong murder mystery film told in a unique way.