Indignation Reviews

  • Jul 19, 2018

    I kept waiting for a real plot to kick in. It did not. Boring. The Dean is heavy handed and the girl is odd and the kid is dull and intense. Skip it.

    I kept waiting for a real plot to kick in. It did not. Boring. The Dean is heavy handed and the girl is odd and the kid is dull and intense. Skip it.

  • Jul 08, 2018

    Im honestly surprised by how high critics rated this movie! Although the film really grapples with some important ideas; the Korean War Draft, anti semitism, family dynamics, sexism, etc, etc, etc, I think that the screen play was poorly written and the acting was sub par. Everyone seemed to be playong a stereotype of themselves, and dylaogue between characters didn't feel real in the slightest. I appreciate the attempt, and I love a good love story, but if i'm honest i only got half way through the movie before I fell asleep, and I am NOT the kind of person who does that! Perhaps it does get better in the second half, though!

    Im honestly surprised by how high critics rated this movie! Although the film really grapples with some important ideas; the Korean War Draft, anti semitism, family dynamics, sexism, etc, etc, etc, I think that the screen play was poorly written and the acting was sub par. Everyone seemed to be playong a stereotype of themselves, and dylaogue between characters didn't feel real in the slightest. I appreciate the attempt, and I love a good love story, but if i'm honest i only got half way through the movie before I fell asleep, and I am NOT the kind of person who does that! Perhaps it does get better in the second half, though!

  • Feb 17, 2018

    Great acting. I especially liked one scene between the dean (played by Tracy Letts) and Logan lerman.

    Great acting. I especially liked one scene between the dean (played by Tracy Letts) and Logan lerman.

  • Feb 12, 2018

    The dialog between the dean and Marcus, the Jewish boy, was brilliant and similar to unjust and demeaning dialogs I have experienced myself with school program directors and professors in recent years. People might think the movie exaggerated this dialog but I have experienced almost exactly what Marcus experienced with the dean. So it was painful to watch this but also reassuring that I wasn't alone with my experience. I really thought the war scenes and sexual scenes were in poor taste and uncalled for. I had thought this was going to be a nostalgic romance and was greatly disappointed to see gory scenes of people getting shot and stabbed and Marcus's girlfriend acting more like a paid prostitute than a real girlfriend. I get that the love story was about a disturbed girl but it was so cold and could have been much more endearing and her character could have been far better developed and explained. Marcus could have shown more concern for her condition at the end too by calling her at the psychiatric hospital.

    The dialog between the dean and Marcus, the Jewish boy, was brilliant and similar to unjust and demeaning dialogs I have experienced myself with school program directors and professors in recent years. People might think the movie exaggerated this dialog but I have experienced almost exactly what Marcus experienced with the dean. So it was painful to watch this but also reassuring that I wasn't alone with my experience. I really thought the war scenes and sexual scenes were in poor taste and uncalled for. I had thought this was going to be a nostalgic romance and was greatly disappointed to see gory scenes of people getting shot and stabbed and Marcus's girlfriend acting more like a paid prostitute than a real girlfriend. I get that the love story was about a disturbed girl but it was so cold and could have been much more endearing and her character could have been far better developed and explained. Marcus could have shown more concern for her condition at the end too by calling her at the psychiatric hospital.

  • Jan 11, 2018

    (4.0 out of 6)- Not original, lacks substance, When we see that something's we enter can give us life or death to know somethings have beginnings and endings. When there are plenty of endings around us when we are surrounded by death. When other endings we see that is part of old age. When we see endings can come in death, of our youth, our homes, our respect, our containments, and friends to see that we also see beginnings in independence, adulthood, new places, new people, friends, networks, and continuous pursuit of knowledge. When we see that others have saw the ending in other things when it comes to suicide they know what beginnings mean to them when they meet those they never saw in anyone else. When what we begin with we don't always end with when turbulence happens in every relationship. Whether it's the end to our self expression when it contradicts an establishment's Integrity. When it's the end to other pointless obligations that we pay others to do for us. When it's the end of many happy molds we see can last the times when the times are changing and those in who are not with it could be left alone. When we don't see the end when such beginnings blind us to not see what ends are happening that make us see too late. When it's the end of such places and people we wish to stay when our betrayal and loyalties are in the wrong place and people to know we ended everything. When we see that we ended up in the only place where ends go to end up losing it all. When what others end up we see they take with them in other places they end up when our past mistakes catches up with us to end everything as we know.

    (4.0 out of 6)- Not original, lacks substance, When we see that something's we enter can give us life or death to know somethings have beginnings and endings. When there are plenty of endings around us when we are surrounded by death. When other endings we see that is part of old age. When we see endings can come in death, of our youth, our homes, our respect, our containments, and friends to see that we also see beginnings in independence, adulthood, new places, new people, friends, networks, and continuous pursuit of knowledge. When we see that others have saw the ending in other things when it comes to suicide they know what beginnings mean to them when they meet those they never saw in anyone else. When what we begin with we don't always end with when turbulence happens in every relationship. Whether it's the end to our self expression when it contradicts an establishment's Integrity. When it's the end to other pointless obligations that we pay others to do for us. When it's the end of many happy molds we see can last the times when the times are changing and those in who are not with it could be left alone. When we don't see the end when such beginnings blind us to not see what ends are happening that make us see too late. When it's the end of such places and people we wish to stay when our betrayal and loyalties are in the wrong place and people to know we ended everything. When we see that we ended up in the only place where ends go to end up losing it all. When what others end up we see they take with them in other places they end up when our past mistakes catches up with us to end everything as we know.

  • Nov 05, 2017

    He should have tried to find the hospital she was taken to - and he should have told his mother not to interfere with his love life. This is the saddest movie ever. I would have made the ending different. I wouldn't have let her slip away from my life. I would have found her and I would have been there for her, like she was for him.

    He should have tried to find the hospital she was taken to - and he should have told his mother not to interfere with his love life. This is the saddest movie ever. I would have made the ending different. I wouldn't have let her slip away from my life. I would have found her and I would have been there for her, like she was for him.

  • Nov 05, 2017

    Logan Lerman expertly plays Marcus Messner, a Jewish teenager going off to college during 1955 at the same time he's juggling his studies he also deals with the Korean War going on and figuring out what's going on with a girl named Olivia Logan is being questioned not just about his own beliefs but also about how he can be tolerant of others who have lack their of his parents also constantly worry about his well-being but they might just be overprotective many don't prefer to practice one religion over another, everyone has the right to practice their own faith, and no one should be forced to belong to a single system of belief Marcus must find his own place in the world even if it means not having everything this is more of a dialogue-driven story keep in mind but the performances are worthy enough for the grittiness to sink in

    Logan Lerman expertly plays Marcus Messner, a Jewish teenager going off to college during 1955 at the same time he's juggling his studies he also deals with the Korean War going on and figuring out what's going on with a girl named Olivia Logan is being questioned not just about his own beliefs but also about how he can be tolerant of others who have lack their of his parents also constantly worry about his well-being but they might just be overprotective many don't prefer to practice one religion over another, everyone has the right to practice their own faith, and no one should be forced to belong to a single system of belief Marcus must find his own place in the world even if it means not having everything this is more of a dialogue-driven story keep in mind but the performances are worthy enough for the grittiness to sink in

  • Oct 28, 2017

    I wish I could rate this film a "20"...

    I wish I could rate this film a "20"...

  • Aug 28, 2017

    Well-told and moving film

    Well-told and moving film

  • Aug 23, 2017

    Having read a number of members' reviews, it occurred to me that appreciation of this movie's plot threads are easily missed by younger generations of viewers. Having grown up in a time close enough to its setting, I instantly became immersed in its unfolding. The film is, indeed, accurately described as a coming of age movie. In contemporary times, we've become accustomed to films that are brash, raw in passions, in your face obvious actions. But this film presents the issues involved with the subtlety, quiet intensity, and nuance which corresponds to what it seeks to portray. There is a sense of the unspoken but ever-present influence of the Jew as "other," as seen when the Dean informs Marcus he was purposely assigned to Jewish roommates. And despite the fact that Marcus had deliberately stated his father's profession was "butcher," the Dean repeatedly inserted his own preference for qualifying that with the terms "kosher" butcher. The Dean saw Marcus' intention was to view himself and to be viewed as a rational, non-sectarian person, but it became clear that Dean Caudwell took it on himself to put Marcus in his place, to accept the category prescribed for him. He was determined to make him conform. Marcus, a highly intelligent, well read young man refused to submit. Checked, the Dean then began attempt to pry into Marcus' personal life, his relationship to his mother and father. The result was a tension-ridden psychological arm-wrestling match, where, again, Marcus refused to tolerate the Dean's underhanded ploy. The centerpiece of the film is Marcus' being drawn ineluctably to the luminously pretty Olivia. It is a classic case of an inexperienced young man being dazzled into pursuing a young woman, one who as he begins to learn has had more experience than his virgin status. We see to warning signs: the surprising sex on the first date--almost unthinkable in the early 50's US, the scar on Olivia's arm from an attempted suicide, her allusion to that being the reason she left her previous college. But even as Marcus learns of these things, his growing intoxication with Olivia blinds him to their implications, with the ultimate tragic results. And that's what this movie is: a tragedy. A brilliant young man with a bright future is ultimately undone by a beautiful but deeply flawed young woman. "She's weak," said Marcus' wise mother, "but her weakness is her strength." But, despite his agreement to stop seeing Olivia, his fate has already been sealed. Once you tune in to the themes and emotions that flow through this movie, it carries you rapt to its jarring and tragic conclusion. A wonderful film.

    Having read a number of members' reviews, it occurred to me that appreciation of this movie's plot threads are easily missed by younger generations of viewers. Having grown up in a time close enough to its setting, I instantly became immersed in its unfolding. The film is, indeed, accurately described as a coming of age movie. In contemporary times, we've become accustomed to films that are brash, raw in passions, in your face obvious actions. But this film presents the issues involved with the subtlety, quiet intensity, and nuance which corresponds to what it seeks to portray. There is a sense of the unspoken but ever-present influence of the Jew as "other," as seen when the Dean informs Marcus he was purposely assigned to Jewish roommates. And despite the fact that Marcus had deliberately stated his father's profession was "butcher," the Dean repeatedly inserted his own preference for qualifying that with the terms "kosher" butcher. The Dean saw Marcus' intention was to view himself and to be viewed as a rational, non-sectarian person, but it became clear that Dean Caudwell took it on himself to put Marcus in his place, to accept the category prescribed for him. He was determined to make him conform. Marcus, a highly intelligent, well read young man refused to submit. Checked, the Dean then began attempt to pry into Marcus' personal life, his relationship to his mother and father. The result was a tension-ridden psychological arm-wrestling match, where, again, Marcus refused to tolerate the Dean's underhanded ploy. The centerpiece of the film is Marcus' being drawn ineluctably to the luminously pretty Olivia. It is a classic case of an inexperienced young man being dazzled into pursuing a young woman, one who as he begins to learn has had more experience than his virgin status. We see to warning signs: the surprising sex on the first date--almost unthinkable in the early 50's US, the scar on Olivia's arm from an attempted suicide, her allusion to that being the reason she left her previous college. But even as Marcus learns of these things, his growing intoxication with Olivia blinds him to their implications, with the ultimate tragic results. And that's what this movie is: a tragedy. A brilliant young man with a bright future is ultimately undone by a beautiful but deeply flawed young woman. "She's weak," said Marcus' wise mother, "but her weakness is her strength." But, despite his agreement to stop seeing Olivia, his fate has already been sealed. Once you tune in to the themes and emotions that flow through this movie, it carries you rapt to its jarring and tragic conclusion. A wonderful film.