Lady Macbeth Reviews

  • May 18, 2020

    Dark, but masterfully done.

    Dark, but masterfully done.

  • May 06, 2020

    Florence Pugh is outstanding in the central role. Period dramas aren't usually my thing but this one had a fiendishly cold and razor sharp edge to it. Really enjoyed it.

    Florence Pugh is outstanding in the central role. Period dramas aren't usually my thing but this one had a fiendishly cold and razor sharp edge to it. Really enjoyed it.

  • Apr 24, 2020

    It was long drawn out and depressing. Horrible people being horrible to other people who might also be horrible.

    It was long drawn out and depressing. Horrible people being horrible to other people who might also be horrible.

  • Apr 07, 2020

    Horrid. The plot barely made since. The acting was amazing but sadly wasted with this movie. Don't waste your time.

    Horrid. The plot barely made since. The acting was amazing but sadly wasted with this movie. Don't waste your time.

  • Dec 28, 2019

    Dreary, yawn inducing 'drama'.

    Dreary, yawn inducing 'drama'.

  • Dec 24, 2019

    This movie simply tells you how long some people go for love and their good will.

    This movie simply tells you how long some people go for love and their good will.

  • Oct 04, 2019

    An adaptation of Nikolai Leskov's Lady Macbeth of the Mtsensk District that ferments with disquieting fury and fearsome dreariness of a scorned woman ensnared in a hellish ménage.

    An adaptation of Nikolai Leskov's Lady Macbeth of the Mtsensk District that ferments with disquieting fury and fearsome dreariness of a scorned woman ensnared in a hellish ménage.

  • Sep 01, 2019

    Strong female refusing to kowtow to the patriarchy.

    Strong female refusing to kowtow to the patriarchy.

  • Jan 30, 2019

    With a menacing 1860s England backdrop, "Lady Macbeth" succeeds around Florence Pugh's breakout performance and her character's need for empowerment that leads to a shocking conclusion in this psychological thriller.

    With a menacing 1860s England backdrop, "Lady Macbeth" succeeds around Florence Pugh's breakout performance and her character's need for empowerment that leads to a shocking conclusion in this psychological thriller.

  • Dec 21, 2018

    Adapted from a 19th century Russian novel and not from Shakespeare (but definitely with overtones from that tragedy), this is really a showcase for Florence Pugh who, at age 20, dominates the proceedings. Pugh plays a young woman who marries (or is purchased) into a wealthy family in the north of England in the 1860s - she clearly has a wilful streak but her husband disdains her and seeks to keep her locked up inside (when she would rather run free on the moors). Her stern father-in-law runs the house and both servants and family are treated with contempt. When these men are called away, Katherine (Pugh) asserts herself, including beginning a passionate affair with a groomsman (Cosmo Jarvis). As gossip begins to spread, Katherine takes increasingly decisive actions to preserve the illicit relationship. As directed by William Oldroyd (in his first feature), this is a rather stately affair, with beautiful period setting and furnishing - but punctuated with moments of passion and violence (disturbingly so). At first, Katherine appears to be a representation of the empowered woman - refusing to yield to the heavy-handed authority of the patriarchy - but as the film progresses and her actions become more ruthless, it is harder to sympathise with her. Is there a political point being made here? It is hard to know. (Inter-racial relationships are also highlighted - so both race and gender are under the microscope). Regardless of its sociological themes, the film is absorbing, a bit Shakespearean, not too long, and Florence Pugh is great.

    Adapted from a 19th century Russian novel and not from Shakespeare (but definitely with overtones from that tragedy), this is really a showcase for Florence Pugh who, at age 20, dominates the proceedings. Pugh plays a young woman who marries (or is purchased) into a wealthy family in the north of England in the 1860s - she clearly has a wilful streak but her husband disdains her and seeks to keep her locked up inside (when she would rather run free on the moors). Her stern father-in-law runs the house and both servants and family are treated with contempt. When these men are called away, Katherine (Pugh) asserts herself, including beginning a passionate affair with a groomsman (Cosmo Jarvis). As gossip begins to spread, Katherine takes increasingly decisive actions to preserve the illicit relationship. As directed by William Oldroyd (in his first feature), this is a rather stately affair, with beautiful period setting and furnishing - but punctuated with moments of passion and violence (disturbingly so). At first, Katherine appears to be a representation of the empowered woman - refusing to yield to the heavy-handed authority of the patriarchy - but as the film progresses and her actions become more ruthless, it is harder to sympathise with her. Is there a political point being made here? It is hard to know. (Inter-racial relationships are also highlighted - so both race and gender are under the microscope). Regardless of its sociological themes, the film is absorbing, a bit Shakespearean, not too long, and Florence Pugh is great.