Marguerite Reviews

  • Aug 03, 2018

    - Marguerite is an odd but loveable tale with a swell monocle - I went to Marguerite with a friend and we spent the entire ride home musing on this and other French movies. We discussed their, for lack of a better term, "Frenchness." French movies are always a refreshing slap in the face. Our discussion quickly lead back to Marguerite as it really is a talking point. She asked if I liked it and I couldn't rightly say I did at the time. I told her to ask me again tomorrow. When she did, I instantly said "yes." I did like it, but I realised what I really liked was Marguerite herself. The creepy butler with the secret agenda, her unloving then loving husband, the ex-opera star turned voice coach and the bearded lady were all well and good, but Marguerite was a vision. Catherine Frot (The Page Turner) playing Marguerite, is magnetic. I couldn't help but fall a little in love with her. She can't sing but - so what? She's generous. She's nice to her staff. She loves her husband and, yeah, she's a little bit crazy. She puts on operatic costumes and has her butler take photos of her. She collects countless pieces of music even though she can't hit a damn note. She's a tad delusional, but that's part of her charm! The film begins with Marguerite holding a private concert for charity. She invites singers and musicians from around France to play and makes herself the guest of honour. There, her singing...er...talents catch the eye of a young music critic, Lucien Beaumont played by Sylvain Dieuaide (Avec amour), and his anarchistic friend, Kyrill von Priest played by Aubert Fenoy (La Vie en Rose) . They plan to use her and her wealth for their own personal gain, but find she is just too loveable to betray. Kyrill was a definite favourite of mine. He and his cheeky monocle were electric on screen. I'd tell you more about the plot, but really, the plot lost me a little; it involved a bearded lady, a dwarf who hired a rent a crowd and a whole feast of other sub-characters that served no real purpose. It got weird. It really did - in an oh so delightfully French way. Marguerite really works with the darkness of the 1920s. The costumes are mostly grey, everything is a little dark and dirty and even Marguerite's infinite wealth is not shown through bright colours. It is shown through a huge eyeball sculpture which, I won't lie, I kind of wanted. Yes, an eyeball sculpture - you see how this movie could get weird now, right? I spent a lot of time looking at what the characters were wearing. I'm not sure if that was a sign of excellent costume work or more because some moments of the plot made my brain go a-wandering. There were a lot of fur coats that would make Cruella DeVil green with envy. There was always something that held my attention, even if it was only a head piece, a shoe or one of those amazing fur coats. Now it would be odd not to mention that another film, Florence Foster Jenkins based on the same American socialite was released around the same time as Marguerite. Xavier Giannoli was beside himself to find that the biographical English counterpart was being made at the same time. But what Marguerite lacks in Hollywood star power it makes up for with artistic heart. Marguerite was odd but loveable. Watch it for Catherine Frot. Watch it for Kyrill and his swell monocle and maybe try and forget the bearded lady. ---------- This review was first published on Narrative Muse, http://www.narrativemuse.co/movies/the-september-issue, and was written Debbie Holloway. Narrative Muse curates the best books and movies by and about women and non-binary folk on our website http://narrativemuse.co and our social media channels.

    - Marguerite is an odd but loveable tale with a swell monocle - I went to Marguerite with a friend and we spent the entire ride home musing on this and other French movies. We discussed their, for lack of a better term, "Frenchness." French movies are always a refreshing slap in the face. Our discussion quickly lead back to Marguerite as it really is a talking point. She asked if I liked it and I couldn't rightly say I did at the time. I told her to ask me again tomorrow. When she did, I instantly said "yes." I did like it, but I realised what I really liked was Marguerite herself. The creepy butler with the secret agenda, her unloving then loving husband, the ex-opera star turned voice coach and the bearded lady were all well and good, but Marguerite was a vision. Catherine Frot (The Page Turner) playing Marguerite, is magnetic. I couldn't help but fall a little in love with her. She can't sing but - so what? She's generous. She's nice to her staff. She loves her husband and, yeah, she's a little bit crazy. She puts on operatic costumes and has her butler take photos of her. She collects countless pieces of music even though she can't hit a damn note. She's a tad delusional, but that's part of her charm! The film begins with Marguerite holding a private concert for charity. She invites singers and musicians from around France to play and makes herself the guest of honour. There, her singing...er...talents catch the eye of a young music critic, Lucien Beaumont played by Sylvain Dieuaide (Avec amour), and his anarchistic friend, Kyrill von Priest played by Aubert Fenoy (La Vie en Rose) . They plan to use her and her wealth for their own personal gain, but find she is just too loveable to betray. Kyrill was a definite favourite of mine. He and his cheeky monocle were electric on screen. I'd tell you more about the plot, but really, the plot lost me a little; it involved a bearded lady, a dwarf who hired a rent a crowd and a whole feast of other sub-characters that served no real purpose. It got weird. It really did - in an oh so delightfully French way. Marguerite really works with the darkness of the 1920s. The costumes are mostly grey, everything is a little dark and dirty and even Marguerite's infinite wealth is not shown through bright colours. It is shown through a huge eyeball sculpture which, I won't lie, I kind of wanted. Yes, an eyeball sculpture - you see how this movie could get weird now, right? I spent a lot of time looking at what the characters were wearing. I'm not sure if that was a sign of excellent costume work or more because some moments of the plot made my brain go a-wandering. There were a lot of fur coats that would make Cruella DeVil green with envy. There was always something that held my attention, even if it was only a head piece, a shoe or one of those amazing fur coats. Now it would be odd not to mention that another film, Florence Foster Jenkins based on the same American socialite was released around the same time as Marguerite. Xavier Giannoli was beside himself to find that the biographical English counterpart was being made at the same time. But what Marguerite lacks in Hollywood star power it makes up for with artistic heart. Marguerite was odd but loveable. Watch it for Catherine Frot. Watch it for Kyrill and his swell monocle and maybe try and forget the bearded lady. ---------- This review was first published on Narrative Muse, http://www.narrativemuse.co/movies/the-september-issue, and was written Debbie Holloway. Narrative Muse curates the best books and movies by and about women and non-binary folk on our website http://narrativemuse.co and our social media channels.

  • Nov 17, 2017

    A fantastic representation of how the opinion, or the non opinion, of others builds our perception of reality. Just a few excesses affect a fantastic movie.

    A fantastic representation of how the opinion, or the non opinion, of others builds our perception of reality. Just a few excesses affect a fantastic movie.

  • Nov 25, 2016

    Prior to Florence Foster Jenkins, 'Marguerite', was on the silver screen and it offers a slightly more entertaining version of the Jenkins saga while being much more loose with the details. This is fine, but it never quite catches fire. Well-acted and funny in parts it overstays it's welcome at 127 minutes. The story veers off the path a bit but it does enough if you can deal with French films.

    Prior to Florence Foster Jenkins, 'Marguerite', was on the silver screen and it offers a slightly more entertaining version of the Jenkins saga while being much more loose with the details. This is fine, but it never quite catches fire. Well-acted and funny in parts it overstays it's welcome at 127 minutes. The story veers off the path a bit but it does enough if you can deal with French films.

  • Oct 01, 2016

    "Marguerite" is a fictitious drama based on the story of the very unfortunately real, notoriously awful and naïve Florence Foster Jenkins (yeah, she gets two films about her this year) who forged a short-lived career as a vocalist by making an ass out of herself. She should be regarded as a cautionary tale rather than an inspiration, in my opinion. Regardless, "Marguerite" is funny at times, but the narrative never feels legitimate, oftentimes sacrificing story for humor and subplots that lead nowhere, and in a film about singing, you would expect better lip-syncing, if not actual singing. Furthermore, "Marguerite's" tagline is "Cover your ears and open your heart." Perhaps, if Giannoli valued our hearts, he wouldn't have left "Marguerite" off on such a low note.

    "Marguerite" is a fictitious drama based on the story of the very unfortunately real, notoriously awful and naïve Florence Foster Jenkins (yeah, she gets two films about her this year) who forged a short-lived career as a vocalist by making an ass out of herself. She should be regarded as a cautionary tale rather than an inspiration, in my opinion. Regardless, "Marguerite" is funny at times, but the narrative never feels legitimate, oftentimes sacrificing story for humor and subplots that lead nowhere, and in a film about singing, you would expect better lip-syncing, if not actual singing. Furthermore, "Marguerite's" tagline is "Cover your ears and open your heart." Perhaps, if Giannoli valued our hearts, he wouldn't have left "Marguerite" off on such a low note.

  • Sep 14, 2016

    Critics said this was the better telling of Florence Foster Jenkins story, but I didn't find it so. More heavy handed artsy, but not better than Streep version.

    Critics said this was the better telling of Florence Foster Jenkins story, but I didn't find it so. More heavy handed artsy, but not better than Streep version.

  • Sep 07, 2016

    while audience in America flock to see Meryl in Florence Jenkin, the French have long taken the theme and went much farther with it with Marguerite. The subplots strangely works here as well and the entire ensemble pull it altogether and made this into more than just a comedie, its a tragicomedie. Besides, Andre Marcon is just that much more dashing than Hugh Grant.

    while audience in America flock to see Meryl in Florence Jenkin, the French have long taken the theme and went much farther with it with Marguerite. The subplots strangely works here as well and the entire ensemble pull it altogether and made this into more than just a comedie, its a tragicomedie. Besides, Andre Marcon is just that much more dashing than Hugh Grant.

  • Sep 04, 2016

    No lip-sync needed for Marguerite Dumont in this movie, and that's a compliment.

    No lip-sync needed for Marguerite Dumont in this movie, and that's a compliment.

  • Aug 20, 2016

    Funny, sad, and most of all, beautifully acted by the one and only frot....

    Funny, sad, and most of all, beautifully acted by the one and only frot....

  • Aug 13, 2016

    The story is all about desire. Marguerite's desperate need for love causes her to hear her voice as she wants it to be rather than the way it is. She's one of film's greatest tragic heroines.

    The story is all about desire. Marguerite's desperate need for love causes her to hear her voice as she wants it to be rather than the way it is. She's one of film's greatest tragic heroines.

  • Aug 06, 2016

    Fantastic, and far better than the Hollywood 'Florence Foster Jenkins'.

    Fantastic, and far better than the Hollywood 'Florence Foster Jenkins'.