Rushmore Reviews

  • May 06, 2019

    With an unlikable lead character who neither learns nor takes responsibility, a meandering plot , miss matched pacing, and not enough laughs to make up for any of it, Rushmore wastes decent formants is leaving the question "What were we supposed to care about?"

    With an unlikable lead character who neither learns nor takes responsibility, a meandering plot , miss matched pacing, and not enough laughs to make up for any of it, Rushmore wastes decent formants is leaving the question "What were we supposed to care about?"

  • Mar 20, 2019

    Wes Anderson is the king of quirky material, but not the king of great stories. The main character has no sense of maturity or growing up. The romance sub-plot is stupid and on the brink of oblivion. It should be a miracle how this movie was so critically acclaimed. I do appreciate the friendships they're trying to build, and the cast does a fine job. He just needs to execute his stories better with more humanity and logical circumstance.

    Wes Anderson is the king of quirky material, but not the king of great stories. The main character has no sense of maturity or growing up. The romance sub-plot is stupid and on the brink of oblivion. It should be a miracle how this movie was so critically acclaimed. I do appreciate the friendships they're trying to build, and the cast does a fine job. He just needs to execute his stories better with more humanity and logical circumstance.

  • Jan 26, 2019

    The best, GREATEST movie ever made!

    The best, GREATEST movie ever made!

  • Dec 25, 2018

    Simpatica commedia che mostra l'avvicinamento di Wes Anderson al suo unico ed inconfondibile stile. Abbiamo una storia tipica dell'eccentrico regista, da cui puo' trarre numerosi spunti in cui propone un umorismo atipico e particolare. Il risultato e' un film tiepido, che porta qualche sorriso grazie ai personaggi protagonisti e senza stupire troppo propone con moderazione un nuovo stile che deve ancora sbocciare del tutto.

    Simpatica commedia che mostra l'avvicinamento di Wes Anderson al suo unico ed inconfondibile stile. Abbiamo una storia tipica dell'eccentrico regista, da cui puo' trarre numerosi spunti in cui propone un umorismo atipico e particolare. Il risultato e' un film tiepido, che porta qualche sorriso grazie ai personaggi protagonisti e senza stupire troppo propone con moderazione un nuovo stile che deve ancora sbocciare del tutto.

  • Dec 04, 2018

    Bel film girato da colui che amo di più tra i registi, Wes Anderson. Questo è uno dei suoi primi lavori e lo stile e la tecnica che lo hanno contraddistinto negli anni sono già presenti ma ancora in maniera meno evidente. Ad esempio ci sono molte inquadrature su lettere o fogli di carta, una delle caratteristiche della regia di Anderson. La trama è interessante e intrattiene per tutta la durata della pellicola, grazie anche ai 3 attori protagonisti che sono stati molto bravi. La messa in scena è ottima, le musiche mi son piaciute. Non l'opera più grande di Anderson, ma di sicuro un pezzo importante della filmografia di questo regista.

    Bel film girato da colui che amo di più tra i registi, Wes Anderson. Questo è uno dei suoi primi lavori e lo stile e la tecnica che lo hanno contraddistinto negli anni sono già presenti ma ancora in maniera meno evidente. Ad esempio ci sono molte inquadrature su lettere o fogli di carta, una delle caratteristiche della regia di Anderson. La trama è interessante e intrattiene per tutta la durata della pellicola, grazie anche ai 3 attori protagonisti che sono stati molto bravi. La messa in scena è ottima, le musiche mi son piaciute. Non l'opera più grande di Anderson, ma di sicuro un pezzo importante della filmografia di questo regista.

  • Nov 27, 2018

    One of Wes Anderson's earlier films, "Rushmore" gives its audience a hilarious script and some great performances from Jason Schwartzman and Bill Murray.

    One of Wes Anderson's earlier films, "Rushmore" gives its audience a hilarious script and some great performances from Jason Schwartzman and Bill Murray.

  • Nov 18, 2018

    Max Fischer (Jason Schwartzman), an eccentric 15-year-old, is a scholarship student at Rushmore Academy, a private school in Houston. He is both Rushmore's most extracurricularly active and least scholarly student. He spends nearly all of his time on elaborate extracurricular activities, dramatically affecting his grades. He also has a feud with the school's headmaster, Dr. Guggenheim. At a school assembly, Max meets Herman Blume (Bill Murray), a disillusioned industrialist who finds his operation of a multimillion-dollar company to be tedious. He is upset that his marriage is failing and the two sons he's putting through Rushmore are impolite and obnoxious brats spoiled by their mother. Herman comes to like Max, and the two become good friends. Max is impressed by Herman's success, while Herman is interested in Max's confident persona. Max also develops an obsession with Rosemary Cross (Olivia Williams), a widowed teacher who arrives at Rushmore as a new first grade instructor. She joined Rushmore after the death of her husband, who was a former student. While she initially tolerates Max and his attempts to pursue her, Rosemary becomes increasingly worried by his obvious infatuation. Along the way, Blume attempts to convince Max that Rosemary is not worth the trouble, only to fall for Rosemary himself. The two begin dating without Max's knowledge... The film helped launch the careers of Anderson and Schwartzman while establishing a "second career" for Murray as a respected actor in independent cinema. At the 1999 Independent Spirit Awards, Anderson won Best Director award and Murray won Best Supporting Male award. Murray also earned a nomination for Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor - Motion Picture. "Rushmore" is considered one of Anderson's finest works and was ranked one of the best films of the 1990s by several publications. In 2016, the film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant". Rotten Tomatoes critical consensus reads, "This cult favorite is a quirky coming of age story, with fine, off-kilter performances from Jason Schwartzman and Bill Murray." In his review for the Daily News, film critic Dave Kehr praised Rushmore as "a magnificent work: the best and most beautiful movie of 1998". USA Today gave the film three out of four stars and wrote that Bill Murray was "at his off-kilter best". Todd McCarthy, in his review for Variety, wrote, "The deep-focus widescreen compositions possess an unusual clarity that adds details and endows the action and humor with exceptional vividness". In his review for Time, Richard Schickel praised Rushmore as "an often deft, frequently droll little movie turns into an increasingly desperate juggling act, first trying to keep too many dark and weighty emotional objects aloft, then trying to bring them back to hand in a graceful and satisfying way". In her review for The New York Times, Janet Maslin wrote, "It's a particular treat for its skewed, hilarious memories of a cutthroat boyhood". In his review for The Independent, Anthony Quinn said of Schwartzman that "he perfectly captures the poignancy of a character who understands his failings but hasn't yet the emotional resources to conquer them". In her review for The Washington Post, Rita Kempley praised Schwartzman's performance for winning "sympathy and a great deal of affection for Max, never mind that he could grow into Sidney Blumenthal". Entertainment Weekly gave Rushmore an "A" rating and wrote, "Anderson concentrates on beautifully disciplined filmmaking, employing 1960s British Invasion hits . . . to further define Max's adolescent dislocation". Jonathan Rosenbaum, in his review for the Chicago Reader, wrote, "To their credit, Anderson and Wilson share none of the class snobbery that subtly infuses much of Salinger's work ... But like Salinger they harbor a protective gallantry toward their characters that becomes the film's greatest strength and its greatest weakness". In Time Out New York, Andrew Johnston wrote: "A breezy comedy about the grey area between adolescence and adulthood, Rushmore makes good on the promise of Wes Anderson's Bottle Rocket - and then some. Thanks to stellar performances and the director's original comic vision, it's easily one of the year's finest films. ... Rushmore is somewhat indebted to Harold and Maude and similar comedies of that era, but the complexity of Max and the audacity of the film's set pieces place it in a league of its own." However, some critics did not review the film so positively. In his review for the Los Angeles Times, Kenneth Turan criticized Max's overtly "snooty" personality as "too off-putting to tolerate" which could potentially discourage audiences when identifying with the film. Film critic Roger Ebert gave the film two-and-a-half stars out of four citing an issue with the film's shift in tone in the final act, stating "the air goes out of the movie" in regards to "stage-setting and character development". He further wrote, "Anderson and Wilson are good offbeat filmmakers ... But their film seems torn between conflicting possibilities: it's structured like a comedy, but there are undertones of darker themes, and I almost wish they'd allowed the plot to lead them into those shadows". A lifelong fan of film critic Pauline Kael, Anderson arranged a private screening of Rushmore for the retired writer. Afterwards, she told him, "I genuinely don't know what to make of this movie". It was a nerve-wracking experience for Anderson but Kael did like the film and told others to see it. Anderson and Jason Schwartzman traveled from Los Angeles to New York City and back on a touring bus to promote the film. The tour started on January 21, 1999 and went through 11 cities in the United States. Wes Anderson´s coming of age film "Rushmore" with the young/old misfit Max as the lead character is slowpaced, indie quirky and a bit too much Anderson to be honest in my eyes. The character oddness move along in some sort of slapstick universe that is not really funny, but more weird/strange with Anderson trying to create something different from a normal narrative and character development. I will give him credit for that. We get great performances from Jason Schwartzman, Bill Murray and lovely Olivia Williams, but the fact remains that the main character Max is an obnoxious little know it all, who is hard to like or for that matter hard to cheer for. And even if Anderson wants to be indie quirky he still falls in many stereotypical holes in his storyline. "Rushmore" is ok, but not Wes Anderson´s best work if you ask me.

    Max Fischer (Jason Schwartzman), an eccentric 15-year-old, is a scholarship student at Rushmore Academy, a private school in Houston. He is both Rushmore's most extracurricularly active and least scholarly student. He spends nearly all of his time on elaborate extracurricular activities, dramatically affecting his grades. He also has a feud with the school's headmaster, Dr. Guggenheim. At a school assembly, Max meets Herman Blume (Bill Murray), a disillusioned industrialist who finds his operation of a multimillion-dollar company to be tedious. He is upset that his marriage is failing and the two sons he's putting through Rushmore are impolite and obnoxious brats spoiled by their mother. Herman comes to like Max, and the two become good friends. Max is impressed by Herman's success, while Herman is interested in Max's confident persona. Max also develops an obsession with Rosemary Cross (Olivia Williams), a widowed teacher who arrives at Rushmore as a new first grade instructor. She joined Rushmore after the death of her husband, who was a former student. While she initially tolerates Max and his attempts to pursue her, Rosemary becomes increasingly worried by his obvious infatuation. Along the way, Blume attempts to convince Max that Rosemary is not worth the trouble, only to fall for Rosemary himself. The two begin dating without Max's knowledge... The film helped launch the careers of Anderson and Schwartzman while establishing a "second career" for Murray as a respected actor in independent cinema. At the 1999 Independent Spirit Awards, Anderson won Best Director award and Murray won Best Supporting Male award. Murray also earned a nomination for Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor - Motion Picture. "Rushmore" is considered one of Anderson's finest works and was ranked one of the best films of the 1990s by several publications. In 2016, the film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant". Rotten Tomatoes critical consensus reads, "This cult favorite is a quirky coming of age story, with fine, off-kilter performances from Jason Schwartzman and Bill Murray." In his review for the Daily News, film critic Dave Kehr praised Rushmore as "a magnificent work: the best and most beautiful movie of 1998". USA Today gave the film three out of four stars and wrote that Bill Murray was "at his off-kilter best". Todd McCarthy, in his review for Variety, wrote, "The deep-focus widescreen compositions possess an unusual clarity that adds details and endows the action and humor with exceptional vividness". In his review for Time, Richard Schickel praised Rushmore as "an often deft, frequently droll little movie turns into an increasingly desperate juggling act, first trying to keep too many dark and weighty emotional objects aloft, then trying to bring them back to hand in a graceful and satisfying way". In her review for The New York Times, Janet Maslin wrote, "It's a particular treat for its skewed, hilarious memories of a cutthroat boyhood". In his review for The Independent, Anthony Quinn said of Schwartzman that "he perfectly captures the poignancy of a character who understands his failings but hasn't yet the emotional resources to conquer them". In her review for The Washington Post, Rita Kempley praised Schwartzman's performance for winning "sympathy and a great deal of affection for Max, never mind that he could grow into Sidney Blumenthal". Entertainment Weekly gave Rushmore an "A" rating and wrote, "Anderson concentrates on beautifully disciplined filmmaking, employing 1960s British Invasion hits . . . to further define Max's adolescent dislocation". Jonathan Rosenbaum, in his review for the Chicago Reader, wrote, "To their credit, Anderson and Wilson share none of the class snobbery that subtly infuses much of Salinger's work ... But like Salinger they harbor a protective gallantry toward their characters that becomes the film's greatest strength and its greatest weakness". In Time Out New York, Andrew Johnston wrote: "A breezy comedy about the grey area between adolescence and adulthood, Rushmore makes good on the promise of Wes Anderson's Bottle Rocket - and then some. Thanks to stellar performances and the director's original comic vision, it's easily one of the year's finest films. ... Rushmore is somewhat indebted to Harold and Maude and similar comedies of that era, but the complexity of Max and the audacity of the film's set pieces place it in a league of its own." However, some critics did not review the film so positively. In his review for the Los Angeles Times, Kenneth Turan criticized Max's overtly "snooty" personality as "too off-putting to tolerate" which could potentially discourage audiences when identifying with the film. Film critic Roger Ebert gave the film two-and-a-half stars out of four citing an issue with the film's shift in tone in the final act, stating "the air goes out of the movie" in regards to "stage-setting and character development". He further wrote, "Anderson and Wilson are good offbeat filmmakers ... But their film seems torn between conflicting possibilities: it's structured like a comedy, but there are undertones of darker themes, and I almost wish they'd allowed the plot to lead them into those shadows". A lifelong fan of film critic Pauline Kael, Anderson arranged a private screening of Rushmore for the retired writer. Afterwards, she told him, "I genuinely don't know what to make of this movie". It was a nerve-wracking experience for Anderson but Kael did like the film and told others to see it. Anderson and Jason Schwartzman traveled from Los Angeles to New York City and back on a touring bus to promote the film. The tour started on January 21, 1999 and went through 11 cities in the United States. Wes Anderson´s coming of age film "Rushmore" with the young/old misfit Max as the lead character is slowpaced, indie quirky and a bit too much Anderson to be honest in my eyes. The character oddness move along in some sort of slapstick universe that is not really funny, but more weird/strange with Anderson trying to create something different from a normal narrative and character development. I will give him credit for that. We get great performances from Jason Schwartzman, Bill Murray and lovely Olivia Williams, but the fact remains that the main character Max is an obnoxious little know it all, who is hard to like or for that matter hard to cheer for. And even if Anderson wants to be indie quirky he still falls in many stereotypical holes in his storyline. "Rushmore" is ok, but not Wes Anderson´s best work if you ask me.

  • Nov 10, 2018

    Fun, awkward, clever. My favorite wes anderson movie rocking a great soundtrack.

    Fun, awkward, clever. My favorite wes anderson movie rocking a great soundtrack.

  • Antonius B Super Reviewer
    Sep 20, 2018

    Quirky, offbeat, and clever; everything we like about director Wes Anderson. We really don't know what's going to happen as the story plays out, in part because of how unique the characters are, and in part because the film plays as fantasy. Max Fischer (Jason Schwartzman), a teenage boy at Rushmore Academy, acts as though he's a worldly middle-aged man, pursuing an improbably large number of extracurricular activities, writing plays, and not caring all that much about his studies. Herman Blume (Bill Murray), a wealthy businessman dissatisfied with his wife's adultery and his two boorish sons, is drawn to Max, and befriends him. However, when the two of them begin vying for the same woman (Olivia Williams), a rivalry develops. What's fascinating about the film is the interplay of these two characters. Blume begins acting in all sorts of juvenile ways, which is an interesting mirror to how precocious Max is. The disillusionment Blume is going through, hammered home with a scene at his dingy, suburban pool where he does a cannonball after downing his whiskey and then stays underwater as it to escape from it all, is similar to the angst we might associate with an adolescent. The breadth of Max's interests, his higher-level thinking about the important things in life, his audacious schemes, and the confidence he exudes pursuing a romance with a teacher or breezing down the hallway in his blazer, is like a powerful movie mogul (or adolescent dream). Anderson gives us a humanizing bridge here between people at the age of 15 and 50. Mixed in to all of this are lots of little moments that are funny or touching. I loved the message that's delivered in a subtle way amidst the fun of the film. Dream big, it seems to tell us; be brave, and don't be afraid to be different. Following the conventional path may lead to outward success, but unhappiness. It's telling to me that Max's father, a humble barber, is the most content character of all. I think the love triangle went on a little longer than it should have, and it would have been nice to see more of Margaret Yang (Sara Tanaka), but it was nice that the film never fell into predictability. Very entertaining.

    Quirky, offbeat, and clever; everything we like about director Wes Anderson. We really don't know what's going to happen as the story plays out, in part because of how unique the characters are, and in part because the film plays as fantasy. Max Fischer (Jason Schwartzman), a teenage boy at Rushmore Academy, acts as though he's a worldly middle-aged man, pursuing an improbably large number of extracurricular activities, writing plays, and not caring all that much about his studies. Herman Blume (Bill Murray), a wealthy businessman dissatisfied with his wife's adultery and his two boorish sons, is drawn to Max, and befriends him. However, when the two of them begin vying for the same woman (Olivia Williams), a rivalry develops. What's fascinating about the film is the interplay of these two characters. Blume begins acting in all sorts of juvenile ways, which is an interesting mirror to how precocious Max is. The disillusionment Blume is going through, hammered home with a scene at his dingy, suburban pool where he does a cannonball after downing his whiskey and then stays underwater as it to escape from it all, is similar to the angst we might associate with an adolescent. The breadth of Max's interests, his higher-level thinking about the important things in life, his audacious schemes, and the confidence he exudes pursuing a romance with a teacher or breezing down the hallway in his blazer, is like a powerful movie mogul (or adolescent dream). Anderson gives us a humanizing bridge here between people at the age of 15 and 50. Mixed in to all of this are lots of little moments that are funny or touching. I loved the message that's delivered in a subtle way amidst the fun of the film. Dream big, it seems to tell us; be brave, and don't be afraid to be different. Following the conventional path may lead to outward success, but unhappiness. It's telling to me that Max's father, a humble barber, is the most content character of all. I think the love triangle went on a little longer than it should have, and it would have been nice to see more of Margaret Yang (Sara Tanaka), but it was nice that the film never fell into predictability. Very entertaining.

  • Sep 15, 2018

    Anderson's sophomore film see him not devolving into self parody yet and delivering a suitably offbeat comedy about a 15 year old prodigy who runs every extracurricular activity and is failing at love with a teacher and in his schooling. A film that boasts some excellent performances but could have used more work to just make it a bit funnier.

    Anderson's sophomore film see him not devolving into self parody yet and delivering a suitably offbeat comedy about a 15 year old prodigy who runs every extracurricular activity and is failing at love with a teacher and in his schooling. A film that boasts some excellent performances but could have used more work to just make it a bit funnier.