The Class - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

The Class Reviews

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October 9, 2016
foarte frumos si realist. m-am oprit la sedinta cu parintii.
May 9, 2016
This is by far the worst movie I have ever seen. It's two hours of stupid french kids sitting in a classroom making sassy comebacks to their teacher who doesn't even really care.
Super Reviewer
February 18, 2016
It's 2 hours of watching a teacher do teacher things. Really does bring into question the definition of "film"
November 18, 2015
Interesting view into a part of French society. Solid but unremarkable. The subject matter just doesn't peak my interest that high.
Super Reviewer
November 6, 2015
As an authentic depiction of Western contemporary teaching in a multicultural school in Paris, this honest film wisely uses a documentary style and young non-actors to offer a realistic view into a culturally diverse city, beautifully escaping the Hollywood school clichés.
November 1, 2015
I enjoyed this even if I'm not sure the film as an overall package ever quite achieves what it sets out to, or if as a cinematic package it ever quite matches the individual tension and interest of the classroom scenes. Well worth a watch though.
October 26, 2015
Intelligent quasi documentary focusing on a French teacher and his students in the outskirts of Paris grappling with teaching, inspiring, class room management and bureaucratic travails. Subtle and well performed. This is no Hollywood Stand and Deliver. Just teachers and kids from a realistic perspective. See this and give a teacher a hug.
June 22, 2015
This true-to-life documentary-style drama set in a French high school was all too real for me. Good performances all round and an interesting screenplay which draws you in to the tensions and games people play. AANFL 1001
March 11, 2015
THE CLASS (aka ENTRE LES MURS) is a film that is certain to be divisive in some way, whether it be with the borderline slavish devotion to realism or the teacher at the center of the story. While I wouldn't say that I loved it, it was very good on multiple levels. The film follows a teacher (Francois Begaudeau) in a Parisian high school and the class he teaches over the course of a year. Pretty early on, it becomes clear that he has a different approach to teaching than a lot of the other teachers he works with, building a rapport with his students by getting to know them on a personal level. Still, this bunch of inner-city kids aren't the easiest to work with, and have a lot of ups and downs with their teacher. Earlier when I used the word "slavish," I didn't completely mean it in a negative sense. What I really mean is that the film goes to great lengths to accurately portray its subject, the Parisian educational system. I remember bits and pieces from when I was in high school French class, but its an entirely different experience watching what it's probably like onscreen. One way in which this film takes a realistic approach is by using (apparently) non-actors/students to portray the class of students. The end credits also indicate that a lot of the teachers used their real first names, probably because they were also teachers in real life. Most importantly, this film is based on the life experiences of the actor portraying the main teacher, M. Marin, who also used to be a teacher himself. Completing this realist approach is the exclusive use of handheld camerawork and the lack of a score. All of these aspects combine to create the feeling of watching a documentary. Even the dialogue doesn't really feel like dialogue, instead hewing pretty close to how French students probably talk. This cinema verite approach might not work with a lot of people, who might find it boring, but I thought it was compelling enough. The only major issue I have, and this could just be me imposing my cultural experiences onto another, is an event which takes place late into the film. Given that the students in this film are fairly rowdy and occasionally disrespectful, it would make sense that there be some disciplinary action taken. And by and large, the teacher deals with his students in a very progressive way. However, I felt like he crossed the line in one scene where he lets his own students get the better of his emotions, and there isn't any repercussions. For me, this was a large setback to the likeability he had established up to that point, and yet after the event boils over it was like nothing had happened at all. Again, it's probably because things work a little differently in France, but it probably wouldn't fly here in the US, especially in the current academic climate. Overall, THE CLASS is still a very valuable and interesting film for the insight it provides into the inner workings of the Parisian school system and the relationship of a teacher with his students. Highly recommended.
½ August 29, 2014
Fascinating look into the classroom in the methodical French style.
½ August 7, 2014
The second film I've watched about education this week. The Class (Entre les Murs) makes us reflect on questions about discipline, authority, methods of learning, and ultimately the purpose of education. These questions are presented within the limits of the fact that teachers are ordinary people, with the usual flaws of ordinary human beings. Anyone who's thinking of being a teacher should watch this.
May 26, 2014
Some films are, simply, outstanding by artistic criteria. They are rich, moving, complex, thought-provoking, intricate, meaningful, or the like. At least partly because of their quality, such films have played a key role in the history of cinema. A film may be historically significant by virtue of its influence on other films. It may create or change a genre, inspire filmmakers to try something new, or gain such a wide popularity that it spawns imitations and tributes.
May 24, 2014
This is a great teacher movie, I was impressed that the teacher played himself in the movie
May 14, 2014
Watching this movie makes you feel that you're really part of the class. The dynamic interactions and intense encounters between the teacher and his students create a very engaging watching experience.
May 5, 2014
Review In A Nutshell:

The Class is an excellent film that explores the difficulties of being a teacher. The whole film takes the point of view from the side of the teacher, and I found this to be interesting as most films would take on the student's point of view in order for the audience to easily relate. The Class successfully made me sympathise and empathise for the struggles that teachers have to go through. The film also accurately depicts students quite accurately and not be boxed in by the stereotypes that are commonly found in school student characters. The film's cinematography takes a hand-held approach, giving the audience a more personal view of the situation. It constantly follows the action of the scene, and is combined with cuts that goes back and forth between our protagonist and the students. I never really noticed the film's score, i'm not even sure if there was a score but it never really needed it as the acting, and story alone creates that sense of drama and tension. Francois Begaudeau plays our protagonist, Francois Marin, and he did a wonderful job in capturing the difficulties and internal frustrations of being a teacher. Laurent Cantet has made a strong film that touches on a perspective that isn't generally used on film. By the end of the film, it made me think back of my high school days and the difficulties that my teachers had to go through in order to get the students to learn and grow. I do thank my teachers for what they have done for me, because without them, I wouldn't be where I am now.
May 4, 2014
Review In A Nutshell:

The Class is an excellent film that explores the difficulties of being a teacher. The whole film takes the point of view from the side of the teacher, and I found this to be interesting as most films would take on the student's point of view in order for the audience to easily relate. The Class successfully made me sympathise and empathise for the struggles that teachers have to go through. The film also accurately depicts students quite accurately and not be boxed in by the stereotypes that are commonly found in school student characters. The film's cinematography takes a hand-held approach, giving the audience a more personal view of the situation. It constantly follows the action of the scene, and is combined with cuts that goes back and forth between our protagonist and the students. I never really noticed the film's score, i'm not even sure if there was a score but it never really needed it as the acting, and story alone creates that sense of drama and tension. Francois Begaudeau plays our protagonist, Francois Marin, and he did a wonderful job in capturing the difficulties and internal frustrations of being a teacher. Laurent Cantet has made a strong film that touches on a perspective that isn't generally used on film. By the end of the film, it made me think back of my high school days and the difficulties that my teachers had to go through in order to get the students to learn and grow. I do thank my teachers for what they have done for me, because without them, I wouldn't be where I am now.
½ April 16, 2014
Absolutely spot on. Hard to believe that this is a movie and not a fly-on-the-wall documentary. Captures both the hope and the hopelessness of kids growing up in mixed race, mixed culture Paris working-class precincts. How anyone can teach classes like this is beyond belief. Amazing.
March 28, 2014
Passionate and realistic film about the relationship between teachers and students; quite possibly the best film about education.
February 2, 2014
brilliant film, totally absorbing. It is impossible to believe that they are acting, even more so that they are not professionals. I've never seen anything like it!
½ January 26, 2014
In Entre les murs (The Class), Begaudeau serves up a 2 hour serving of gritty school dynamics, realistic acting, comedy and tragedy. There are few films which can truly capture the essence of a ZEP-like college in France, and all the actors here do it splendidly.
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