The Class Reviews

  • Jun 03, 2018

    Based on an autobiographical novel written by the protagonist, performed by actual students and filmed from a documentarylike observational perspective, this Cannes Palme d'Or winner and Oscar nominee for Best Foreign Language Film divulges an unflinchingly honest portrait of the challenges teaching at a Parisian multi-ethnic working class school.

    Based on an autobiographical novel written by the protagonist, performed by actual students and filmed from a documentarylike observational perspective, this Cannes Palme d'Or winner and Oscar nominee for Best Foreign Language Film divulges an unflinchingly honest portrait of the challenges teaching at a Parisian multi-ethnic working class school.

  • Dec 06, 2017

    Ce n'est pas bon. The characters are unlikable, boring, pretentious. The cinematography is clostrophobic. No resolution. I felt no emotion throughout the movie.

    Ce n'est pas bon. The characters are unlikable, boring, pretentious. The cinematography is clostrophobic. No resolution. I felt no emotion throughout the movie.

  • Sep 27, 2016

    foarte frumos si realist. m-am oprit la sedinta cu parintii.

    foarte frumos si realist. m-am oprit la sedinta cu parintii.

  • May 09, 2016

    This is by far the worst movie I have ever seen. It's two hours of stupid french kids sitting in a classroom making sassy comebacks to their teacher who doesn't even really care.

    This is by far the worst movie I have ever seen. It's two hours of stupid french kids sitting in a classroom making sassy comebacks to their teacher who doesn't even really care.

  • Nov 18, 2015

    Interesting view into a part of French society. Solid but unremarkable. The subject matter just doesn't peak my interest that high.

    Interesting view into a part of French society. Solid but unremarkable. The subject matter just doesn't peak my interest that high.

  • Nov 01, 2015

    I enjoyed this even if I'm not sure the film as an overall package ever quite achieves what it sets out to, or if as a cinematic package it ever quite matches the individual tension and interest of the classroom scenes. Well worth a watch though.

    I enjoyed this even if I'm not sure the film as an overall package ever quite achieves what it sets out to, or if as a cinematic package it ever quite matches the individual tension and interest of the classroom scenes. Well worth a watch though.

  • Oct 26, 2015

    Intelligent quasi documentary focusing on a French teacher and his students in the outskirts of Paris grappling with teaching, inspiring, class room management and bureaucratic travails. Subtle and well performed. This is no Hollywood Stand and Deliver. Just teachers and kids from a realistic perspective. See this and give a teacher a hug.

    Intelligent quasi documentary focusing on a French teacher and his students in the outskirts of Paris grappling with teaching, inspiring, class room management and bureaucratic travails. Subtle and well performed. This is no Hollywood Stand and Deliver. Just teachers and kids from a realistic perspective. See this and give a teacher a hug.

  • Mar 25, 2015

    This true-to-life documentary-style drama set in a French high school was all too real for me. Good performances all round and an interesting screenplay which draws you in to the tensions and games people play. AANF Pd'O 1001

    This true-to-life documentary-style drama set in a French high school was all too real for me. Good performances all round and an interesting screenplay which draws you in to the tensions and games people play. AANF Pd'O 1001

  • Feb 17, 2015

    THE CLASS (aka ENTRE LES MURS) is a film that is certain to be divisive in some way, whether it be with the borderline slavish devotion to realism or the teacher at the center of the story. While I wouldn't say that I loved it, it was very good on multiple levels. The film follows a teacher (Francois Begaudeau) in a Parisian high school and the class he teaches over the course of a year. Pretty early on, it becomes clear that he has a different approach to teaching than a lot of the other teachers he works with, building a rapport with his students by getting to know them on a personal level. Still, this bunch of inner-city kids aren't the easiest to work with, and have a lot of ups and downs with their teacher. Earlier when I used the word "slavish," I didn't completely mean it in a negative sense. What I really mean is that the film goes to great lengths to accurately portray its subject, the Parisian educational system. I remember bits and pieces from when I was in high school French class, but its an entirely different experience watching what it's probably like onscreen. One way in which this film takes a realistic approach is by using (apparently) non-actors/students to portray the class of students. The end credits also indicate that a lot of the teachers used their real first names, probably because they were also teachers in real life. Most importantly, this film is based on the life experiences of the actor portraying the main teacher, M. Marin, who also used to be a teacher himself. Completing this realist approach is the exclusive use of handheld camerawork and the lack of a score. All of these aspects combine to create the feeling of watching a documentary. Even the dialogue doesn't really feel like dialogue, instead hewing pretty close to how French students probably talk. This cinema verite approach might not work with a lot of people, who might find it boring, but I thought it was compelling enough. The only major issue I have, and this could just be me imposing my cultural experiences onto another, is an event which takes place late into the film. Given that the students in this film are fairly rowdy and occasionally disrespectful, it would make sense that there be some disciplinary action taken. And by and large, the teacher deals with his students in a very progressive way. However, I felt like he crossed the line in one scene where he lets his own students get the better of his emotions, and there isn't any repercussions. For me, this was a large setback to the likeability he had established up to that point, and yet after the event boils over it was like nothing had happened at all. Again, it's probably because things work a little differently in France, but it probably wouldn't fly here in the US, especially in the current academic climate. Overall, THE CLASS is still a very valuable and interesting film for the insight it provides into the inner workings of the Parisian school system and the relationship of a teacher with his students. Highly recommended.

    THE CLASS (aka ENTRE LES MURS) is a film that is certain to be divisive in some way, whether it be with the borderline slavish devotion to realism or the teacher at the center of the story. While I wouldn't say that I loved it, it was very good on multiple levels. The film follows a teacher (Francois Begaudeau) in a Parisian high school and the class he teaches over the course of a year. Pretty early on, it becomes clear that he has a different approach to teaching than a lot of the other teachers he works with, building a rapport with his students by getting to know them on a personal level. Still, this bunch of inner-city kids aren't the easiest to work with, and have a lot of ups and downs with their teacher. Earlier when I used the word "slavish," I didn't completely mean it in a negative sense. What I really mean is that the film goes to great lengths to accurately portray its subject, the Parisian educational system. I remember bits and pieces from when I was in high school French class, but its an entirely different experience watching what it's probably like onscreen. One way in which this film takes a realistic approach is by using (apparently) non-actors/students to portray the class of students. The end credits also indicate that a lot of the teachers used their real first names, probably because they were also teachers in real life. Most importantly, this film is based on the life experiences of the actor portraying the main teacher, M. Marin, who also used to be a teacher himself. Completing this realist approach is the exclusive use of handheld camerawork and the lack of a score. All of these aspects combine to create the feeling of watching a documentary. Even the dialogue doesn't really feel like dialogue, instead hewing pretty close to how French students probably talk. This cinema verite approach might not work with a lot of people, who might find it boring, but I thought it was compelling enough. The only major issue I have, and this could just be me imposing my cultural experiences onto another, is an event which takes place late into the film. Given that the students in this film are fairly rowdy and occasionally disrespectful, it would make sense that there be some disciplinary action taken. And by and large, the teacher deals with his students in a very progressive way. However, I felt like he crossed the line in one scene where he lets his own students get the better of his emotions, and there isn't any repercussions. For me, this was a large setback to the likeability he had established up to that point, and yet after the event boils over it was like nothing had happened at all. Again, it's probably because things work a little differently in France, but it probably wouldn't fly here in the US, especially in the current academic climate. Overall, THE CLASS is still a very valuable and interesting film for the insight it provides into the inner workings of the Parisian school system and the relationship of a teacher with his students. Highly recommended.

  • Aug 29, 2014

    Fascinating look into the classroom in the methodical French style.

    Fascinating look into the classroom in the methodical French style.